Globe iconLogin iconRecap iconSearch iconTickets icon
news

MLB News

Lugo limited by toe injury, still playing catch

@cdenicola13
February 19, 2020

PORT ST. LUCIE, Fla. -- Mets right-hander Seth Lugo, who fractured his left pinkie toe on Monday night, continues to play catch in order to keep his arm in shape.

PORT ST. LUCIE, Fla. -- Mets right-hander Seth Lugo, who fractured his left pinkie toe on Monday night, continues to play catch in order to keep his arm in shape.

Mets manager Luis Rojas on Wednesday clarified his statement from the day prior, in which he noted that Lugo had stopped throwing. The right-hander will keep playing catch from 90 and 120 feet, just not off a slope.

The club’s plan also includes limiting Lugo's movement drills for a few days.

"There's no concern," Rojas said. "It's very small. Better today than what he felt yesterday when he had the padding in his spike. That's something he did yesterday to get the feel. Today he felt better playing catch. You guys will see him playing catch probably every day in the next couple of days."

Lugo, who spoke to media on Wednesday morning for the first time since the injury, stubbed his toe on an ottoman in his hotel room. When it happened, he didn't think much of it at first.

"I knew it hurt, but I was walking around fine that night, and [then I] woke up the next morning and it was bruised and pretty swollen," Lugo said. "Figured I'd get it checked out."

X-rays on Tuesday revealed the fracture, and Lugo was fitted for a sole insert that protects the cleat from bending and further injuring the toe.

Lugo, who projects to be a late-inning option for the Mets after posting a 2.70 ERA in 61 relief outings in 2019, had been scheduled to throw live batting practice on Wednesday.

"You hit 30 and I start breaking stuff," said Lugo, who turned 30 years old in November and had never broken a bone before. "It should be OK, though. I'm not too concerned about it. I can still throw, and I intend to stay high volume. Arm will stay in shape, and [we’ll] just go from there."

Christina De Nicola is a reporter and game producer for MLB.com based in Miami. Follow her on Twitter @CDeNicola13.