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Fearsome 5: Statcast's hardest-hitting lineups

These clubs figure to pack the most punch in 2016
MLB.com

It may have taken a bit longer than usual, but the majority of this offseason's top free-agent sluggers have found landing spots for 2016, while some teams went to the trade market to work on their lineups. Either way, by now most teams have a pretty solid idea of what their projected starting lineups look like.

With that in mind, let's use Statcast™ to take a look at which clubs figure to boast the hardest-hitting overall lineups. Though any number of offensive statistics can be used to create a formula geared toward 2016 projections, this ranking is simply based upon each player's average exit velocity from last season.

It may have taken a bit longer than usual, but the majority of this offseason's top free-agent sluggers have found landing spots for 2016, while some teams went to the trade market to work on their lineups. Either way, by now most teams have a pretty solid idea of what their projected starting lineups look like.

With that in mind, let's use Statcast™ to take a look at which clubs figure to boast the hardest-hitting overall lineups. Though any number of offensive statistics can be used to create a formula geared toward 2016 projections, this ranking is simply based upon each player's average exit velocity from last season.

Hot Stove Tracker

That, of course, means that this is not a definitive ranking of the league's best offenses. After all, the Marlins' Dee Gordon led the league with 205 hits last year while ranking 366th in average exit velocity -- out of 373 players who put at least 100 balls in play.

Video: Reviewing numbers and lessons from Statcast™ in 2015

Instead, this is simply a look at the teams expected to pack the most punch, based on the cumulative average exit velocity of their projected starting position players. Note that expected starters with no Major League experience, such as Minnesota's Byung Ho Park, were not considered for the purposes of this piece. In that particular situation, the Twins' average was derived from only the other eight starters.

5. Orioles
Average exit velocity: 90.6 mph

Baltimore's two key moves so far this offseason -- re-signing Chris Davis and acquiring Mark Trumbo from Seattle -- are the reason the O's cracked the top five. Believe it or not, Trumbo actually finished eighth in the Majors last year (minimum 100 balls in play) with a 94.2-mph average exit velocity. Toss in Davis (93.1 mph) and all-around talent Manny Machado (93.2 mph), and the Orioles become one of just two teams to enter the spring with three players who had an average exit velocity of at least 93 mph last year. Beyond those three, Jonathan Schoop could be poised for a breakout season after registering a 91.5-mph average exit velocity in limited action, while veterans Adam Jones (89.8 mph) and Matt Wieters (88.1 mph) could boost the team average even further if they manage to stay healthy.

Video: TB@BAL: Davis crushes two home runs in win over Rays

4. Blue Jays
Average exit velocity: 90.8 mph

Though it may be surprising to see last year's highest-powered offense ranked fourth, take note that they finished just one-tenth of a mph behind each of the next two clubs. Despite the ranking, Toronto still sports arguably the most balanced starting lineup. As it stands now, seven of the Blue Jays' nine projected starters finished last season with an average exit velocity north of 90 mph, the most such starters on any one team. Jose Bautista (94.5 mph) and Josh Donaldson (93.7 mph) also give Toronto the most formidable 1-2 punch in the Majors, after finishing fourth and 12th, respectively, in average exit velocity last year.

Video: TEX@TOR Gm2: Donaldson crushes homer 418 feet

3. Mets
Average exit velocity: 90.9 mph

The Mets certainly benefit in this category from re-signing Yoenis Cespedes, though his 93.1-mph average exit velocity last year was actually not the highest on the team. That honor belonged to rookie Michael Conforto, who logged a 93.5-mph average en route to hitting nine home runs and racking up a .506 slugging percentage in just 56 games. Though Lucas Duda (92.2 mph) gives the Mets a third thumper in the middle of the lineup, New York most benefits from the fact that no projected starter had an average exit velocity last year below 89.2 mph. No other team had all of its 2016 projected starters finish with an average above 88 mph a season ago.

Video: NYM@LAD Gm2: Statcast™ examines Conforto's solo homer

2. Cubs
Average exit velocity: 90.9 mph

The Cubs (90.94 mph) narrowly edged out the fellow National League-finalist Mets (90.9 mph) for the second spot on this list. Chicago made one of the biggest splashes in free agency this offseason by luring outfielder Jason Heyward away from the rival Cardinals. Heyward and his 91.3 mph average exit velocity join a young core that already features sluggers Kyle Schwarber (94.5 mph), Jorge Soler (93 mph), Kris Bryant (90.8 mph) and Anthony Rizzo (90.1 mph). Given the fact that the club also has Javier Baez's 91.3-mph average exit velocity coming off the bench, it's no surprise that the stacked Cubs roster set a single-game postseason record with six homers in Game 3 of last year's NL Division Series.

Video: STL@CHC Gm4: Schwarber blasts 419-foot homer

1. Marlins
Average exit velocity: 91.2 mph

Though this is largely the result of Giancarlo Stanton's staggering 99.1-mph average exit velocity (Miguel Cabrera was second at 95.1 mph), the Marlins are far from a one-hit wonder. In fact, half of Miami's expected starting lineup -- Stanton, Justin Bour, Marcell Ozuna and Christian Yelich -- finished with an average exit velocity of at least 92 mph last year, making it the only team with four such projected starters. The Marlins would have had an even bigger hold on the top spot if not for being "weighed down" by Gordon, who racked up all those hits despite an average exit velocity of just 84.6 mph.

Paul Casella is a reporter for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter at @paul_casella.

This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.