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Hoffman had unusual workout outfit

Closer wore hospital scrubs throughout Major League career
San Diego Padres

Bill Center, longtime sportswriter for U-T San Diego, is an employee of the Padres.

All baseball players try to find practical and comfortable clothes to work out in when not in the eye of the public.

Bill Center, longtime sportswriter for U-T San Diego, is an employee of the Padres.

All baseball players try to find practical and comfortable clothes to work out in when not in the eye of the public.

Some wear sweats. Others wear shorts and loose-fitting tops.

But Trevor Hoffman had some unusual workout gear. And once he found the right outfit, he didn't ever change it.

Throughout his Major League career, Hoffman worked out in hospital scrubs from the University of Kentucky Medical Center. In fact, he started wearing the scrubs while he was still in the Reds organization.

"I got my first set from Kevin Jarvis," Hoffman said of the starting pitcher who was a teammate then and again with the Padres from 2001-03.

"Kevin was wearing them, liked them and gave me a set to try. At first, they were thick and a little stiff. But I loved how they were open at the top and felt across my shoulders and arms. And once you broke them in, they got softer and thinner and really felt good."

They must have felt really good. Hoffman wore the first set he got for 15 years. They went from light blue in color to something that resembled a shade of faded blue wrapping paper.

"They were coming apart at the end," Hoffman said. "There were rips and holes in the fabric. I thought they felt great."

That is when he acquired a second set from the University of Kentucky.

"At first, it was weird how much different the new ones felt from the 15-year-old set," Hoffman said. "But once I wore them and washed them a dozen times they were as good as old."

Hoffman said there was nothing to dislike about the scrubs.

"If you were doing work on the ground, they didn't stick to the ground," Hoffman saud. "They breathed when you were running and dried out quickly. They weren't binding. They were perfect. I joked once that it was sad they only lasted 15 years."

San Diego Padres