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Vlad's glad to be at camp -- but not ready to coach yet

MLB.com @Alden_Gonzalez

TEMPE, Ariz. -- Vladimir Guerrero's advice to the Angels players who have asked is to "see the ball and swing hard," which can be very simple if your name is Vladimir Guerrero -- and excruciatingly difficult if it's anything else.

Saturday was Guerrero's second of seven days as a special guest instructor at Spring Training, and that's good enough. He isn't ready to do this whole coaching thing full-time just yet. He enjoys relaxing at home in the Dominican Republic and playing third base and hitting long home runs in a fast-pitch softball league that plays every Saturday and Sunday.

TEMPE, Ariz. -- Vladimir Guerrero's advice to the Angels players who have asked is to "see the ball and swing hard," which can be very simple if your name is Vladimir Guerrero -- and excruciatingly difficult if it's anything else.

Saturday was Guerrero's second of seven days as a special guest instructor at Spring Training, and that's good enough. He isn't ready to do this whole coaching thing full-time just yet. He enjoys relaxing at home in the Dominican Republic and playing third base and hitting long home runs in a fast-pitch softball league that plays every Saturday and Sunday.

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His team's name? "Los Locos." ("The Crazies," Guerrero specified, just in case.)

"I still don't have the time to be a coach," he said.

While he's here, Guerrero can touch base with his nephew, Gabby, an outfielder for the D-backs. And when he leaves, he'll visit his 16-year-old son, Vladimir Guerrero Jr., who got $3.9 million from the Blue Jays last July because he already boasts prolific power.

Guerrero Sr. is 41 now, five years removed from his final season -- he still looks like he can give you 300 plate appearances, though -- and at peace with his life outside of the Major Leagues.

"No more," Guerrero said, in Spanish, when asked if he misses playing. "My first year, after retirement, yeah. But now it's been three or four years. I don't really miss it now."

Tweet from @Angels: .@VladGuerrero27 meets with the media. #LAASpring pic.twitter.com/l67Aju7h6K

Guerrero's career ended with a .318/.379/.553 slash line, 449 home runs and 2,590 hits. He made the All-Star team nine times, won an American League Most Valuable Player Award -- with the Angels in 2004 -- and walked away with eight Silver Slugger Awards, too. He's a worthy Hall of Fame candidate, though probably not a certain one.

The Baseball Writers Association of America will decide that for the first time this year.

"I'm thankful to be on the ballot," Guerrero said. "We'll see what happens."

The question, of course, is which cap Guerrero will wear if he does get in. He spent eight years and put up slightly better numbers with the Montreal Expos, but played in the postseason in five of his six years with the Angels, who still don't have a single representative in Cooperstown.

Guerrero has gone back and forth on that question constantly, and he did so again Saturday.

"Well," he said, "there's no longer a team in Montreal. I think there's a possibility that it can be with the Angels."

The Hall of Fame narrows a player's choices down and ultimately lets them decide. Guerrero would likely get to choose between the Expos and Angels -- not the Rangers and Orioles, with whom he spent his final two seasons. Cooperstown would also let him go logo-less on his plaque, like Tony La Russa and Greg Maddux did recently.

Hall of Fame or not, Guerrero's legacy lives on as perhaps the greatest bad-ball hitter in history, blasting home runs on any pitch that traveled within the same ZIP code.

That is not something Guerrero will preach at Angels camp.

"All I've told them is to see the ball and swing hard," he said. "I can't tell them to swing at bad pitches, because they're not going to hit it."

Alden Gonzalez is a reporter for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter @Alden_Gonzalez and Facebook , and listen to his podcast.

Los Angeles Angels