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Eaton jolted after slamming into wall

MLB.com @scottmerkin

CLEVELAND -- White Sox outfielder Adam Eaton had a fairly painful depiction of his crashing into the wall during the sixth inning of Friday's 10-4 loss to the Indians, taking away extra bases from Roberto Perez in the process.

"It felt like I was in an 18 mph car accident," said Eaton, who left the game after the collision but said he passed the concussion protocol. "I feel better today. The reason I came out mostly was because I first of all lost my breath pretty well. I couldn't breathe at all. It was kind of a jolt, whiplash that I got.

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CLEVELAND -- White Sox outfielder Adam Eaton had a fairly painful depiction of his crashing into the wall during the sixth inning of Friday's 10-4 loss to the Indians, taking away extra bases from Roberto Perez in the process.

"It felt like I was in an 18 mph car accident," said Eaton, who left the game after the collision but said he passed the concussion protocol. "I feel better today. The reason I came out mostly was because I first of all lost my breath pretty well. I couldn't breathe at all. It was kind of a jolt, whiplash that I got.

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"If anybody has ever been in a car accident, it's kind of the same thing. It's taking inventory of the body parts and making sure everything is back to where we're supposed to be, and as soon as that is accounted for, we'll get back out there and play again."

Eaton is known as a hard-nosed player who will give his body to make a play. He has maintained that focus while toning it down a bit, not injuring himself while going all-out for a ball that might be 10 rows into the stands as he occasionally did his first year with the White Sox.

"He just has a better understanding of how to go through the season," said White Sox manager Robin Ventura, who referred to Eaton as "pretty dang valuable" overall this season. "Before he was just out there running crazy and right now he has a better understanding of what he can get to.

"Last night was just a great play. He runs into the wall and gets himself banged up. But it wasn't just out of going after it and not having a chance to get it."

Although Eaton was in good spirits Saturday, he seemed to be a bit perturbed by comments he referred to about his effort leading to the collision. Eaton said it was nobody in the clubhouse who made the comments and indicated it dealt more with something he read on social media.

"Instead of choosing my body, I chose my team," Eaton said. "People can curse me for it, but the day that I backpedal and let the ball hit off the wall is the day I'm going to quit baseball.

"Either the team can like it that I hustle, run into walls and put my body on the line for my teammates or they can just, I guess it is what it is. I could care less. I put my team before my body, just how I've been brought up, how I've been taught to play the game. If I die on the field, that's where I want to die.

"I shouldn't be reading anything that anybody puts out there," Eaton said. "You play hard and then all of a sudden you get hurt playing hard and then people have a problem with it."

Saladino out of action

Infielder Tyler Saladino will miss the White Sox last two games of the series in Cleveland, along with Eaton, as he continues to be bothered by back issues and was moving very gingerly Saturday.

Ventura believes it's better for both players to be re-evaluated Monday when they return to Chicago before returning to the field.

Scott Merkin has covered the White Sox for MLB.com since 2003. Read his blog, Merk's Works, follow him on Twitter @scottmerkin, on Facebook and listen to his podcast.

This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

Chicago White Sox, Adam Eaton