Globe iconLogin iconRecap iconSearch iconTickets icon
news

MLB News

Girardi: No regrets playing it safe with Severino

Right-hander in line to start Game 6 if necessary; Judge struggling with curve in playoffs
MLB.com @BryanHoch

NEW YORK -- Even though it appears that Luis Severino was removed from Game 2 of the American League Championship Series due to an overabundance of caution, Joe Girardi said that he can accept that outcome. The Yankees' manager said that it seemed far preferable to losing his All-Star right-hander to an injury.

Severino worked just four innings in the Yanks' 2-1 loss to the Astros on Saturday at Minute Maid Park, having been lifted after Girardi said someone in New York's dugout spotted the hurler making awkward movements with his right shoulder. Severino's pleas to remain in the game were unsuccessful.

View Full Game Coverage

NEW YORK -- Even though it appears that Luis Severino was removed from Game 2 of the American League Championship Series due to an overabundance of caution, Joe Girardi said that he can accept that outcome. The Yankees' manager said that it seemed far preferable to losing his All-Star right-hander to an injury.

Severino worked just four innings in the Yanks' 2-1 loss to the Astros on Saturday at Minute Maid Park, having been lifted after Girardi said someone in New York's dugout spotted the hurler making awkward movements with his right shoulder. Severino's pleas to remain in the game were unsuccessful.

View Full Game Coverage

:: ALCS schedule and coverage ::

"I asked him if he still hated me," Girardi said before Game 3. "He said no. That's progress."

Girardi said that Severino is in line to start Game 6 of the ALCS presented by Camping World, should the Yankees advance that far. Though Severino said that he still feels physically ready to throw another "20 to 30 innings," the 23-year-old fired a career-high 193 1/3 innings in the regular season and has added 11 1/3 more in the playoffs.

"I'm really relieved," Girardi said. "I mean, he was throwing pretty good. He really was. But again, with the amount of innings he's thrown, there was some concern.

"It was just more of a precaution. I had to make a tough call, because, believe me, I didn't want to take him out. But again, I would have had a much harder time had I left him in and he got hurt. This I can live with."

Severino received no further tests following a brief examination in the visiting clubhouse at Minute Maid Park, though Girardi said that Yanks team physician Christopher Ahmad would probably evaluate Severino prior to Game 3.

"If the doctor says no tests, we're not going to have them," Girardi said. "We were pleased with the exam the other day after the game. My guess is we'll stay the course."

Trouble with the curve

Though Aaron Judge has been susceptible to breaking balls this postseason, having been fed a steady diet of low-and-away spinners, Girardi said that there have also been a number of pitches that Judge should have been able to do damage on. Judge's 19 strikeouts are the second most by a Yankee in the postseason; Alfonso Soriano (26 in 2003) holds the Major League record.

"I think the key is when you get a good pitch to hit, to make sure you put a good pass on it and a good swing on it," Girardi said. "He's probably had some to hit, whether he's taken them or just fouled them straight back. You get to this time of the year, there's a reason that people are here. There's less mistakes made."

Girardi added that he believes the 6-foot-7 Judge has been rung up on some close third strikes that would not have been called on a player with a more traditional body type.

"I think Aaron falls victim of more strikes called on him that maybe shouldn't be," Girardi said. "I think part of that is his height. I've always said I think there's more low pitches called on him. I'm not faulting umpires. You see 250 pitches every four days, so it's thousands and thousands of pitches. In your mind, you have what is a strike. Well, it changes with body types, and he's such a tall guy that maybe it's hard to adjust a little bit."

Bryan Hoch has covered the Yankees for MLB.com since 2007. Follow him on Twitter @bryanhoch and on Facebook.

New York Yankees