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Fun fact: Bill Murray once played pro baseball, got a hit

Bill Murray is known for a few things: 

- Being one of the greatest comedians of all-time, starring on "Saturday Night Live," and appearing in films like "Meatballs," "Groundhog Day," and "Garfield." Well, maybe not that last one. 

- Saving the city of New York from certain disaster in the documentary "Ghostbusters." 

- Doing whatever he wants, whenever he wants. 

He's also a pretty big baseball fan, being a part-owner of a number of Minor League clubs like the Charleston Riverdogs, Hudson Valley Renegades and St. Paul Saints among others. So it's not all that weird when Murray is found taking tickets before Saints games, doing Harry Caray impressions before MudHens games, or sprinting around the bases at a Cubs game: 

What you may not realize is that Murray has a professional hit to his credit. In 1978, the not-yet-ready-for-primetime player took his talents to the independent Grays Harbor Loggers of Aberdeen, Wash., for five weeks.

Ostensibly done for a SNL special featuring what the performers did over the summer break, Murray took the sport plenty seriously. Coming on as pinch-hitter for his first pro at-bat, Murray rapped a single against the Victoria Mussels, though he would later claim that it was off a "junior high fastball."

It's not something that the comedian wanted to give up. As director Ivan Reitman said of Murray's reluctance to shoot "Meatballs" over the summer

"I said to him once, 'Look, if this little movie does something, you'll have used your summer wisely.' And he kept saying, 'I just wanted to play baseball.' But once he was with us, he was with us to the end. Creatively, he was such a great partner, so funny. I quickly had a sense that we had something special there."

For more on Murray's time with the Loggers, including the time he was nearly arrested for serving beer to fans in the crowd, check out the full oral history here. You can also see Murray's career 1-for-2 line with the Loggers at Baseball-Reference. And then, while we wait for someone to make Murray's Loggers jersey for sale, stick around to watch Murray and Caray chat in 1988: