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Reds and Brewers experiment with game in low gravity, combine for seven HRs, three grand slams

The International Space Station sure was lucky they decided to take in a Mets game instead of the Reds-Brewers matchup at Miller Park on Tuesday night. Because if they were, chances are they'd have a dinged up spaceship after the two teams combined for seven atmosphere-scraping home runs. I don't even want to know what the labor costs on those repairs would be.

While there were plenty of your normal, boring, run-of-the-mill 400-foot shots that make you question your life worth as you struggle to hit the ball out of the infield in your beer league softball game, the real gems were the three whole grand slams. 

That's right, three players came to the plate with the bases full and then launched massive shots into the cold, dark, unfeeling night. 

Jay Bruce hit one 415 feet in the third inning before Todd Frazier followed with a second-deck shot in the fourth:

Frazier

At that point you probably thought, "Two grand slams in one game? Well, tonight was far too exciting. I'd better have a glass of warm milk and settle down." 

Well, sorry. In the sixth inning, Elian Herrera dropped Burke Badenhop's offering into the stands for just his second career home run: 

Herrera

The final grand salami tied the teams for most ever in a game with the Orioles (Larry Sheets and Jim Dwyer) and Rangers (Toby Harrah) on Aug. 6, 1986, Astros (Billy Hatcher) and Cubs (Brian Dayett and Keith Moreland) on June 3, 1987 and the Yankees and Athletics on Aug. 25, 2011. The Yankees own the record for most by a single team as they had all three grand slams with shots from Robinson Cano, Russell Martin and Curtis Granderson: 

The Reds had a chance to tie that record when Brandon Phillips came up to the plate with the bases loaded in the top of the seventh. Instead, he singled up the middle to drive in two. Thanks to all the homers, the two teams combined for 26 runs, with the Reds emerging victorious, 16-10. 

While all of those records are nice though, there is only one grand slam game that will ever hold the hearts and minds of the American public: Fernando Tatis' two in one inning: