Necrology

In remembrance of baseball legends
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Red Adams was born a on Oct. 8, 1921, in Parlier, Calif. and pitched for the Chicago Cubs during the 1946 season. In eight games, Adams recorded eight strikeouts. The legendary Tommy John gives Adams credit for encouraging him to throw more fastballs. Adams passed away on Jan. 18, 2017.

Vic Albury was born on May 12, 1947 in Key West, Fla. and pitched in the big leagues for four seasons, all with the Minnesota Twins. A left-handed hurler, Albury compiled a record of 18-17 and had a career ERA of 4.11. Albury passed away on April 18, 2017 in Tampa, Fla.

Ruben Amaro Sr. was born on Jan. 6, 1936, in Nuevo Laredo, Mexico and spent 11 seasons in the big leagues between the St. Louis Cardinals, Philadelphia Phillies, New York Yankees and California Angels. A versatile infielder, Amaro Sr. was a strong defender and played most of his career at shortstop. Offensively, Amaro Sr. collected 505 hits during his career and posted a .309 on-base percentage. In 1964, Amaro Sr. won a Gold Glove while with the Philadelphia Phillies. Amaro Sr. passed away on March 31, 2017, in Weston, Fla.

Vic Barnhart was born on Sept. 1, 1922, in Hagerstown, Md. and played for three seasons in the Majors. A shortstop and third baseman, Barnhart played in 74 games for the Pittsburgh Pirates from 1944 to 1946. In 204 at-bats, Barnhart collected 55 hits and drove in 19 runs, putting together a batting average of .270. Barnhart passed away on April 13, 2017, in his hometown of Hagerstown, Md.

Ed Barnowski was born on Aug. 23, 1943 and pitched for two seasons in the Major Leagues, both for the Baltimore Orioles. He made his big league debut on Sept. 8, 1965 and went on to post a career ERA of 2.45. Barnowski passed away on Oct. 17, 2017 in Naples, Fla.

Don Baylor was born on June 28, 1949 in Austin, Texas and went on to have a long, successful career in baseball. A left fielder and first baseman, Baylor played for 19 seasons in the big leagues, making the American League All-Star team in 1979, the same year that he won the American League MVP Award after hitting 36 home runs and driving in 139 RBIs to compliment 120 runs scored and 22 stolen bases. A three-time Silver Slugger Award winner, Baylor clubbed 338 home runs during his career, collecting 2,135 hits, 1,276 RBIs and 285 stolen bases. Baylor was a World Series champion in 1987 with the Minnesota Twins, and went on to manage for nine seasons, leading the Colorado Rockies to the NLDS in 1995 when he was voted National League Manager of the Year. Baylor passed away on Aug. 7, 2017 in his hometown of Austin, Texas.

Bob Borkowski was born on Jan. 27, 1926 in Dayton, Ohio and was a right-handed hitting outfielder in the big leagues for six seasons between the Chicago Cubs, Cincinnati Reds and Brooklyn Dodgers. Borkowski made his big league debut on April 22, 1950 and went on to collect 294 hits and 112 RBIs during his career. Borkowski passed away on Nov. 18, 2017 in his hometown of Dayton, Ohio.

Bob Bowman was born on May 10, 1931, in Laytonville, Calif. He played right field and pinch hit for the Philadelphia Phillies, making his MLB debut in 1955. Bowman held a batting average of .249 over the course of five seasons, compiling 17 homers. Bowman passed away on Jan. 27, 2017, in San Jose, California.

Jackie Brown was born on May 31, 1943, in Holdenville, Okla. and played for seven seasons in the Major Leagues between the Washington Senators, Texas Rangers, Cleveland Indians and Montreal Expos. A right-handed pitcher who appeared in 214 games, Brown posted an ERA of 4.18 and a record of 47-53. Brown passed away on Jan. 8, 2017, in Holdenville, Okla.

Mark Brownson was born on June 17, 1975, in Lake Worth, Fla. Brownson pitched for the Colorado Rockies and the Philadelphia Phillies, making his MLB debut in 1998. He held a 6.94 ERA over the course of three seasons. Brownson passed away on Feb. 1, 2017, in Wellington, Fla.

Bob Bruce was born on May 16, 1933, in Detroit and pitched for nine seasons between the Detroit Tigers, Houston Colt .45's and Atlanta Braves. In 219 appearances, Bruce collected 49 wins and posted an ERA of 3.85 in 1,122 1/3 innings pitched. Bruce passed away on March 15, 2017, in Plano, Texas.

Jim Bunning was born on Oct. 23, 1931 in Southgate, Ky. and made his Major League debut on July 20, 1955 with the Detroit Tigers. Bunning would go on to pitch for 17 seasons in the big leagues, posting a record of 224-184 and an ERA of 3.27 to accompany 2,855 strikeouts. A nine-time All-Star, Bunning was inducted in to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1996. Following his career, Bunning served as a member of both the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. Bunning passed away on May 26, 2017 in Edgewood, Ky.

Paul Casanova was born on Dec. 21, 1941 in Colon, Cuba and made his big league debut on Sept. 18, 1965. A catcher for 10 seasons in the Major Leagues, Casanova was a member of the American League All-Star team in 1967 and notched 627 hits and 50 home runs during his career. Casanova passed away on Aug. 12, 2017 in Miami, Fla.

Bob Cerv was born on May 5, 1925, in Weston, Neb. and played for 12 seasons in the big leagues as a right-handed hitting left fielder. In his career, Cerv clubbed 105 homers and drove in 374 runs, making an All-Star appearance in 1958 while with the Kansas City Athletics when he hit 38 homers, a single-season record for Major League Baseball in Kansas City. Cerv won a World Series with the New York Yankees in 1956 and was also roommates with Roger Maris and Mickey Mantle in 1961 when they were battling for the single-season home run record. Cerv passed away on April 6, 2017, in Blair, Neb.

Bill Champion was born on Sept. 18, 1947, in Shelby, N.C. and spent eight seasons in the big leagues. A right-handed pitcher, Champion played for the Philadelphia Phillies and Milwaukee Brewers, appearing in 202 games. Champion posted an ERA of 4.69 and a record of 34-50 in 804.1 innings pitched. Champion passed away on Jan. 7, 2017, in Shelby, N.C.

Chuck Churn was born on Feb. 1, 1930 in Bridgetown, Va. and made his big league debut on April 18, 1957 for the Pittsburgh Pirates. In three big league seasons, the right-handed pitcher appeared in 25 games, posting a record of 3-2 and an ERA of 5.10, winning a World Series with the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1959. Churn passed away on Oct. 21, 2017 in Lady Lake, Fla.

Gene Conley was born on Nov. 10, 1930 in Muskogee, Okla. and played for 11 seasons in the Major Leagues. A four-time All-Star, the right-handed hurler compiled a record of 91-96 during his career to compliment an ERA of 3.82. A multi-sport athlete, Conley won a World Series in 1957 with the Milwaukee Braves in addition to three NBA championships with the Boston Celtics between 1959 and 1961. Conley passed away on July 4, 2017 in Foxborough, Mass.

Darren Daulton was born on Jan. 3, 1962 in Arkansas City, Kan. and played in the big leagues for 14 seasons, all but one with the Philadelphia Phillies. A three-time All-Star and a Silver Slugger Award winner in 1992, Daulton won a World Series with the Florida Marlins in 1997, the final year of his career. Daulton was the 1997 National League Comeback Player of the Year, and finished his career with 137 homers, 891 hits and an on-base percentage of .357. Daulton passed away on Aug. 6, 2017 in Clearwater, Fla.

Bobby Doerr was born April 7, 1918 in Los Angeles and would go on to play his entire 14-year career with the Boston Red Sox. Elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1986, the right-handed hitting second baseman was a nine-time American League All-Star and became one of the most beloved figures in Red Sox history. During his career, Doerr collected 2,042 hits and slugged 223 home runs for a career average of .288 and an on-base percentage of .362, though he became most well-known for his stellar defensive play at second base. Doerr missed the entire 1945 season while serving in the United States Army. Prior to passing away on Nov. 13, 2017 in Junction City, Ore. Doerr was the oldest living MLB player at the age of 99.

Jim Donohue was born on Oct. 31, 1937 in St. Louis and pitched for two seasons between the Detroit Tigers, Los Angeles Angels and Minnesota Twins. A right-handed hurler, Donohue posted a record of 6-8 and an ERA of 4.29 over 155.1 innings of work. Donohue passed away on Sept. 9, 2017 in his hometown of St. Louis.

Jack Faszholz was born on April 11, 1927, in St. Louis and pitched in four games for the St. Louis Cardinals during the 1953 season. After his playing career, Faszholz coached the baseball team at Concordia University in Nebraska for 12 seasons. Faszholz passed away on March 25, 2017.

Ernie Fazio was born on Jan. 25, 1942 in Oakland, California. and was a middle infielder for three big league seasons between the Houston Colt .45's and the Kansas City Athletics. Fazio made his big league debut on July 3, 1962 and played in 141 games during his career, notching 50 hits and scoring 37 runs. Fazio passed away on Dec. 1, 2017 in Danville, California.

Todd Frohwirth was born on Sept. 28, 1962, in Milwaukee and pitched for nine seasons in the Major Leagues between the Philadelphia Phillies, Baltimore Orioles, Boston Red Sox and California Angels. In 284 games, Frohwirth went 20-19 with an ERA of 3.60 in 417 2/3 innings pitched. After his playing career, Frohwirth worked as a scout for the Baltimore Orioles. Frohwirth passed away on March 26, 2017.

Doug Gallagher was born on Feb. 21, 1940 in Fremont, Ohio and made his debut for the Detroit Tigers on April 9, 1962 against the Washington Senators. Gallagher pitched in nine big league games, logging 25 innings and notching one save. Gallagher also threw two no-hitters in the Minor Leagues, and served both in the United States Air Force reserves and as an Air Force military policeman. Gallagher passed away on Dec. 17, 2017 in his hometown of Fremont, Ohio.

Ned Garver was born Dec. 25, 1925, in Ney, Ohio. Garver pitched for the St. Louis Browns, Detroit Tigers, Kansas City Athletics and Los Angeles Angels, making his MLB debut in 1948. He held a 3.73 career ERA over the course of 14 seasons, finishing second in the 1951 American League MVP voting and making the American League All-Star roster that same season. Garver passed away on Feb. 26, 2017, in Bryan, Ohio.

Dick Gernert was born on Sept. 28, 1928 in Reading, Pa. and played first base and left field for 11 seasons in the big leagues, making his debut on April 16, 1952. During his career, Gernert collected 632 hits 103 home runs, spending the majority of his career with the Boston Red Sox. Gernert passed away on Nov. 30, 2017 in his hometown of Reading, Pa.

Miguel González was born on Sept. 23, 1983 in La Habana, Cuba and made his big league debut on Sept. 3, 2014 for the Philadelphia Phillies. A right-handed pitcher, González pitched for one season, appearing in six games and logging 5.1 innings of work. González passed away on Nov. 23, 2017 in Cuba.

Dallas Green was born on Aug. 4, 1934, in Newport, Del. and pitched for eight seasons in the big leagues between the Philadelphia Phillies, Washington Senators and New York Mets. In 185 games, Green posted a record of 20-22 and an ERA of 4.26. After his playing career, Green became involved in scouting and coaching, eventually becoming the manager of the Philadelphia Phillies and leading them to their first ever World Series championship in 1980. A beloved figure in the City of Brotherly Love, Green passed away on March 22, 2017, in Philadelphia.

Don Gross was born on June 30, 1931 in Weidman, Mich. and pitched for six seasons in the big leagues. A left-handed pitcher, Gross compiled a record of 20-22 and an ERA of 3.73 in 398 innings of work, recording his best season in 1956 when he went 3-0 with an ERA of 1.95 in 69.1 innings. Gross passed away on Aug. 10, 2017 in his hometown of Weidman, Mich.

Roy "Doc" Halladay was born on May 14, 1977 in Denver, and would go on to become one of the most dominant pitchers of his generation. A two-time Cy Young Award winner, the right-handed hurler was an eight-time All-Star and compiled 203 wins and an ERA of 3.38 in his 16 big league seasons. Widely respected throughout the game, Halladay was known not only for his play on the field, but for his fantastic character off the field as well. One of the last of his kind, Halladay logged 67 complete games during his career, 20 of them shutouts, including the 20th perfect game in Major League history. Halladay passed away on Nov. 7, 2017 in the Gulf of Mexico.

Bill Hands was born on May 6, 1940, in Hackensack, N.J. and pitched for 11 seasons in Major League Baseball. A right-handed hurler, Hands spent 1966 to 1972 with the Chicago Cubs and finished his career with a record of 111-110, a strong ERA of 3.35 and 1,951 innings pitched. In 1969, Hands posted a fantastic season, going 20-14 with an ERA of 2.49 in exactly 300 innings pitched. Hands passed away on March 9, 2017, in Orlando, Fla.

Mickey Harrington was born on Oct. 8, 1934 in Hattiesburg, Miss. and was a pinch runner in the big leagues for one season with the Philadelphia Phillies. Harrington made his Major League debut on July 10, 1964 as a pinch runner. Harrington passed away on Sept. 20, 2017 in his hometown of Hattiesburg, Miss.

Roy Hawes was born on July 5, 1926 in Shiloh, Ill. and was a left-handed hitting first baseman for the Washington Senators for one season in 1951. Hawes made his big league debut on Sept. 23, 1951 for the Senators and notched one hit in six career at-bats. Hawes passed away on Oct. 9, 2017 in Ringgold, Ga.

Solly Hemus was born on April 17, 1923 in Phoenix, Ariz. and played with the St. Louis Cardinals and Philadelphia Phillies during his 11 years in the Majors. In 1941 before his big league career began, Hemus joined the United States Navy, where he would serve for four years. Hemus was a shortstop and second baseman, hitting a career .273 and leading the league once in runs scored, finishing his career with a .390 on-base percentage. Upon finishing his playing career, Hemus pursued a managerial career with the Cardinals from 1959-1961. From there, he coached with the New York Mets from 1962-1963 and was a member of the Cleveland Indians staff from 1964-1965. The last man alive to have managed in the 1950s before his death, Hemus passed away on Oct. 2, 2017 in Houston, Texas.

John Hernstein was born on March 31, 1938 in Hampton, Va. and played for five seasons in the Major Leagues. A first baseman and left fielder, Hernstein made his big league debut on Sept. 15, 1962 and went on to play for the Philadelphia Phillies, Chicago Cubs and Atlanta Braves. In 239 career games, Hernstein notched 99 hits and drove in 34 RBIs. Hernstein passed away on Oct. 3, 2017 in Chillicothe, Ohio.

Mark Higgins was born on July 9, 1963, in Miami and played in six games for the Cleveland Indians during the 1989 season. A right-handed hitting first baseman, Higgins was taken by the Texas Rangers in the 13th round of the 1983 MLB Draft and notched one hit and one walk during his time in MLB. Higgins passed away on March 22, 2017, in Duluth, Ga.

Garry Hill was born on Nov. 3, 1946 in Rutherfordton, N.C. and pitched for the Atlanta Braves in 1969, making his big league debut on July 12, 1969. The right-handed hurler was drafted by the Braves in the first round of the June 1967 MLB Amateur Draft. Hill passed away on Sept. 20, 2017 in Charlotte, N.C.

Dave Hilton was born on Sept. 15, 1950 in Uvalde, Texas and went on to play four seasons in the Major Leagues, all for the San Diego Padres. A second baseman and third baseman, Hilton was the first overall pick in the Jan. 1971 MLB Amateur Draft. Hilton made his big league debut on Sept. 10, 1972 and finished his career with 108 hits and 33 RBIs in 161 games and 506 at-bats. Hilton passed away on Sept. 17, 2017 in Scottsdale, Ariz.

Greg Jelks was born on Aug. 16, 1961, in Cherokee, Ala. and played for the Philadelphia Phillies during the 1987 season. In 10 games, the corner infielder made 14 plate appearances. Jelks eventually served as an assistant coach for the Australian national team in the 2000 Olympics, 2001 Baseball World Cup and 2006 World Baseball Classic. Jelks passed away on Jan. 5, 2017, in Sydney, Australia.

Manny Jiménez was born on Nov. 19, 1938 in San Pedro de Macoris, Dominican Republic and made his big league debut on April 11, 1962 for the Kansas City Athletics. A left-handed hitting left fielder, Jiménez played for seven seasons, compiling 273 hits, 26 home runs and 144 RBIs during his career. Jiménez passed away on Dec. 12, 2017 in New York.

Jerry Kindall was born on May 27, 1935 in St. Paul, Minn. and was an infielder in the Major Leagues for nine seasons. Nicknamed "Slim", Kindall was widely loved and respected around the baseball world. After his career, Kindall began a long coaching career in college baseball, serving as the head coach at the University of Arizona from 1973 to 1996, leading the team to three College World Series championships. Kindall is one of only two men ever to win a College World Series as both a player and a coach, and was the first man ever to accomplish the feat. Kindall passed away on Dec. 24, 2017 in Tucson, Ariz.

Bob Kuzava was born on May 28, 1923 in Wyandotte, Mich. and went on to win three World Series championships with the New York Yankees during his 10-year career in the big leagues. A left-handed hurler, Kuzava logged a career ERA of 4.05, notching 49 wins and 446 strikeouts over 862 innings pitched. Kuzava served in the U.S. Army between 1943 and 1945, rising to the rank of Sergeant, which would earn him the nickname of "Sarge" on the diamond. Kuzava passed away on May 15, 2017 in his hometown of Wyandotte, Mich.

Jim Landis was born on March 9, 1934 in Fresno, Calif. and was a center fielder in the Major Leagues for 11 seasons. Between 1960 and 1964, Landis won five consecutive Gold Glove Awards and was also an All-Star during the 1962 season. With a career on-base percentage of .344, 1,061 hits and 139 stolen bases, Landis was a solid hitter in addition to his above average defense. Landis passed away on Oct. 7, 2017 in Napa, Calif.

Frank Lary was born on April 10, 1930 and was a right-handed pitcher in the big leagues for 12 seasons. Lary played primarily for the Detroit Tigers, and was a Gold Glove Award winner and a three-time All-Star with the ballclub. Nicknamed "The Yankee Killer", Lary led the American League in wins in 1956 and finished his career with a record of 128-116 as well as an ERA of 3.49. Lary passed away on Dec. 13, 2017 in Northport, Alabama.

Don Lock was born on July 27, 1936 in Wichita, Kan. and played in the big leagues for eight seasons between the Washington Senators, Philadelphia Phillies and Boston Red Sox. A right-handed center fielder, Lock clubbed 122 home runs during his career, compiling 642 hits and an on-base percentage of .331. Lock passed away on Oct. 8, 2017 in his hometown of Wichita, Kan.

Al Luplow was born on March 13, 1939 in Saginaw, Mich. and played outfield in the big leagues for seven seasons. A talented player, Luplow made his big league debut on Sept. 16, 1961, and was a member of the 1962 Topps All-Star Rookie Team. Luplow passed away on Dec. 28, 2017 in his hometown of Saginaw, Mich.

Harry MacPherson was born on July 10, 1926, in North Andover, Mass. Macpherson pitched for the Boston Braves, making his MLB debut in 1944 at the age of 17. He pitched just one inning in the big leagues, collecting one strikeout and allowing one walk while surrendering no hits. He passed away on Feb. 19, 2017, in Englewood, Fla.

Andy Marté was born on Oct. 21, 1983, in Villa Tapia, Hermanas Mirabal, Dominican Republic. Throughout his career in Major League Baseball, Marté served as a third baseman and first baseman for the Cleveland Indians, Atlanta Braves and Arizona Diamondbacks. He played in 308 games, collecting 186 hits and clubbing 21 home runs. Marté passed away on Jan. 22, 2017, in the Dominican Republic.

Lee May was born on March 23, 1943 in Birmingham, Ala. and was an outfielder and first baseman in the big leagues for 18 seasons. A three-time All-Star, May earned the nickname "Big Bopper" due to his 354 home runs, 147 of which he hit for the Cincinnati Reds between 1965 and 1971. A member of the Reds Hall of Fame, May was also an All-Star with the Houston Astros in 1972, and finished his career with 2,031 hits and 1,244 RBIs. May passed away on July 29, 2017 in Cincinnati.

Dave McDonald was born on May 20, 1943 in New Albany, Ind. and made his Major League debut as a left-handed hitting first baseman on Sept. 15, 1969. McDonald spent two seasons in the big leagues between the New York Yankees and Montreal Expos, playing in 33 games. McDonald passed away on May 19, 2017 in Pompano Beach, Fla.

Mike McQueen was born on Aug. 30, 1950 in Oklahoma City and made his big league debut on Oct. 2, 1969 for the Atlanta Braves at the age of 18. McQueen would go on to pitch for five seasons between the Braves and Cincinnati Reds, compiling a record of 5-11 and an ERA of 4.66. McQueen passed away on Oct. 9, 2017 in Batesville, Ark.

Sam Mele was born on Jan. 21, 1922, in Astoria, N.Y. and played for six different teams during his 10 seasons in the Major Leagues. During his playing career, the right fielder and first baseman notched 916 hits and 80 homers, putting together a career batting average of .267. After he played, Mele served as the manager of the Minnesota Twins from 1961 to 1967, compiling a record of 524-436 and receiving the 1965 Manager of the Year Award. After his managerial career ended, Mele worked in the Boston Red Sox organization for 25 years, primarily as a scout. Mele passed away on May 1, 2017, in Quincy, Mass.

Gene Michael was born on June 2, 1938 in Kent, OH. Michael was the manager and General Manager of the New York Yankees from 1980 to 1981 and again from 1990 to 1995, spending a year managing the Chicago Cubs in between from 1986-1987. During his 10 years in the Majors, Michael played shortstop and second base spending time between the Pittsburgh Pirates, Los Angeles Dodgers, New York Yankees and Detroit Tigers. Michael's claim to fame was his expertise at pulling the "hidden ball trick" on his opponents during his playing days. Michael passed away on Sept. 7, 2017 in Oldsmar, Fla.

Ed Mierkowicz was born on March 6, 1924 in Wyandotte, Mich. and went on to play for four seasons in the big leagues. A right-handed hitting left fielder, Mierkowicz won a World Series championship with the Detroit Tigers in 1945. Nicknamed "Mouse", Mierkowicz was the last surviving member of the Tigers 1945 championship team when he passed away on May 19, 2017 in Rochester Hills, Mich.

Morris Nettles was born on Jan. 26, 1952, in Los Angeles and played in 168 games between two seasons for the California Angels. A left-handed outfielder, Nettles collected 116 hits in 469 at-bats for an average of .247. During his two seasons in the Major Leagues, Nettles also swiped 42 bases on 68 attempts. Nettles passed away on Jan. 24, 2017, in Venice, Calif.

Luis Olmo was born on Aug. 11, 1919, in Arecibo, Puerto Rico and played six seasons in Major League Baseball between the Brooklyn Dodgers and the Boston Braves. The second Puerto Rican to play in the Major Leagues and the first to play in the World Series, Olmo drove in 110 runs in 1945, leading the National League in triples that year as well, with 13. In 462 career games, Olmo collected 458 hits, compiling a career average of .281. Olmo passed away on April 28, 2017, in San Juan, Puerto Rico.

Bob Perry was born on Sept. 14, 1934 in New Bern, N.C. and played center field in the big leagues for two seasons with the Los Angeles Angels. In 131 games, Perry notched 103 hits and a batting average of .266, slugging six home runs as well. Perry passed away on July 2, 2017 in his hometown of New Bern, N.C.

Ed Phillips was born on Sept. 20, 1944 in Ardmore, Okla. and was a right-handed pitcher for the Boston Red Sox, appearing in 18 games during the 1970 season. In 23.2 innings pitched, Phillips recorded 23 strikeouts and an ERA of 5.32. Phillips passed away on Sept. 20, 2017 in Wells, Maine.

Jim Piersall was born on Nov. 14, 1929 in Waterbury, Conn. and made his big league debut on Sept. 7, 1950 for the Boston Red Sox. A right-handed hitting center fielder, Piersall played for 17 big league seasons, compiling 1,604 hits and 104 home runs during his career. A two-time All-Star and two-time Gold Glove Award winner, Piersall led the American League in doubles in 1956 with 40. Piersall passed away on June 3, 2017 in Wheaton, Ill.

Rance Pless was born on Dec. 6, 1925 in Greeneville, Tenn. and played for the Kansas City Athletics for one season in 1956. A right-handed hitting corner infielder, Pless played in 48 games, batting .271, collecting 23 hits and driving in nine RBIs. Pless passed away on Nov. 11, 2017 in his hometown of Greeneville, Tenn.

Ross Powell was born on Jan. 24, 1968 in Grand Rapids, Mich. and spent three seasons in the Major Leagues as a left-handed pitcher for the Cincinnati Reds, Houston Astros and Pittsburgh Pirates. In 48 games, Powell logged 53.1 innings of work, striking out 42 batters. Powell passed away on Oct. 25, 2017 in Lucas, Texas.

Don Prince was born on April 5, 1938 in Clarkton, N.C. and made his big league debut on Sept. 21, 1962 for the Chicago Cubs. In his one outing in the Major Leagues, Prince spun a scoreless frame, resulting in a career ERA of 0.00. Prince passed away on Nov. 8, 2017 in Myrtle Beach, S.C.

John Rheinecker was born on May 28, 1929 in Belleville, Ill. and was a left-handed pitcher in the big leagues for two seasons, both with the Texas Rangers. Rheinecker made his Major League debut on April 22, 2006 and went on to put together a career record of 8-9 with an ERA of 5.65 over 121 innings of work. Rheinecker passed away on July 18, 2017 in St. Louis.

Al Richter was born on Feb. 7, 1927 in Norfolk, Va. and made his Major League debut on Sept. 23, 1951 as a right-handed hitting shortstop. Richter played for two seasons, both with the Boston Red Sox, logging 14 plate appearances for the club. Richter missed two seasons while serving in the United States Army during World War II, from 1945 to 1946. Richter passed away on Oct. 29, 2017 in Virginia Beach, Va.

Jim Rivera was born on July 22, 1921 in New York, N.Y. and was an outfielder for the St. Louis Browns, Chicago White Sox and Kansas City Athletics during his 10-year career in the Major Leagues. Appearing in 1,171 games and collecting 503 hits, Rivera was the 1953 American League Triples leader and 1955 American League Stolen Bases leader, and was inducted into the Chicagoland Sports Hall of Fame. Rivera passed away on Nov. 13, 2017 in Fort Wayne, Ind.

Bob Sadowski was born on Jan. 15, 1937, in St. Louis and played for four seasons in the Major Leagues. A left-handed hitting third baseman and right fielder, Sadowski compiled 73 hits in 329 at-bats, swatting seven homers and driving in 46 runs. Sadowski passed away on Jan. 6, 2017, in St. Louis.

Paul Schaal was born on March 3, 1943 in Pittsburgh, Pa. and was a third baseman for the California Angels, Kansas City Royals and Los Angeles Angels. Named to the 1965 Topps All-Star Rookie Team, Schaal appeared in 1,128 games, collected 869 hits and ended his career with a .244 batting average. Schaal passed away on Sept. 1, 2017 in Waikoloa, HI.

Roy Sievers was born on Nov. 18, 1926, in St. Louis and played for 17 seasons in Major League Baseball between the St. Louis Browns, Chicago White Sox, Philadelphia Phillies and both Washington Senators teams. A five-time All-Star, Sievers also won the first ever American League Rookie of the Year Award in 1949, batting .308 with 16 homers and 91 runs batted in during his rookie campaign for the St. Louis Browns. A right-handed first baseman and left fielder, Sievers slugged 318 homers and drove in 1,147 runs in his career, batting .267 along the way. He led the American League in home runs and runs batted in during the 1957 season. Sievers passed away on April 3, 2017, in Spanish Lake, Mo.

Daryl "Big Dee" Spencer was born on July 13, 1928, in Wichita, Kan. and played for 10 seasons between four different teams. A versatile infielder, Spencer finished his career with a slash-line of .244/.327/.380 and slugged 105 homers in 1,098 games. After starting his career with the New York Giants from 1952 to 1953, Spencer was called into military service during the Korean War, before returning to the team in 1956. After establishing himself as the team's starting shortstop, Spencer went on to hit the first home run on the West Coast for the newly relocated San Francisco Giants in 1958. Spencer's Major League career ended in 1963, after which he played in Japan for seven seasons. Spencer finished his professional career with 338 home runs. Spencer passed away on Jan. 2, 2017, in Wichita, Kan.

Daryl "Tracy Stallard was born on Aug. 31, 1937 in Coeburn, Va. and pitched for seven seasons with the Boston Red Sox, New York Mets and St. Louis Cardinals. Stallard became part of baseball history in 1961 when he allowed Roger Maris' record-setting 61st home run. He was also the only hitter ever with at least 200 career plate appearances and no walks. Stallard passed away on Dec. 6, 2017 in Kingsport, Tenn.

Dick Starr was born on March 2, 1921, in Kittanning, Pa. and pitched for five seasons in the big leagues between 1947 and 1951. A right-handed pitcher, Starr appeared in 93 games, putting together a record of 12-24 and an ERA of 5.25 over 344.2 innings pitched. Starr's professional baseball career took a hiatus when he served in the United States Army during World War II from 1943 to 1945. Starr passed away on Jan. 18, 2017, in Kittanning, Pa.

Herm Starrette was born on Nov. 20, 1936 in Statesville, N.C. and pitched for three years with the Baltimore Orioles from 1961 to 1965. He was a coach for the Atlanta Braves, San Francisco Giants, Philadelphia Phillies, Milwaukee Brewers, Chicago Cubs, Baltimore Orioles and Boston Red Sox where his coaching career came to an end. Starrette passed away on June 2, 2017 in Statesville, N.C.

Rick Stelmaszek was born on Oct. 8, 1948 in Chicago and was a catcher for the Washington Senators, Texas Rangers, California Angels and Chicago Cubs during his three years in the Major Leagues between 1971 and 1974. After his career ended as a player, Stelmaszek joined the Minnesota Twins coaching staff in 1981 and remained there until 2012. In 2017, the Twins honored him by inviting him to throw the ceremonial first pitch on opening day. Stelmaszek passed away on Nov. 6, 2017 in Chicago.

Walt Streuli was born in Memphis, Tenn. on Sept. 26, 1935. Streuli was a catcher for the Detroit Tigers, making his MLB debut in 1954. He posted a .250 career batting average over the course of three seasons. He passed away on Jan. 19, 2017, in Greensboro, N.C.

Stan Swanson was born May 19, 1944 in Yuba City, Calif. and was an outfielder for the Montreal Expos during the 1971 season. With 48 game appearances, Swanson collected 26 hits and had a .245 batting average. Swanson passed away on Sept. 1, 2017 in Fallbrook, Calif.

Bob Talbot was born June 6, 1927 in Visalia, Calif. Talbot was a centerfielder for two years with the Chicago Cubs making 122 appearances and collecting 107 hits with a .247 batting average. He passed away on Oct. 31, 2017 in Visalia, Calif.

Yordano Ventura was born on June 3, 1991, in Samana, Samana, Dominican Republic and played for the Kansas City Royals. Known to fans as "Ace," the starting pitcher appeared in 94 games, notched 38 wins and posted an ERA of 3.89. In 2015, he played an important role in the Kansas City Royals' World Series championship. Ventura passed away on Jan. 22, 2017, in San José de Ocoa, San José de Ocoa, Dominican Republic.

Gene Verble was born June 29, 1928 in Concord, N.C. An infielder, Verble spent two seasons in the Major Leagues with the Washington Senators making 81 appearances with a .202 batting average. After his time in the Majors, Verble spent six years managing in the Minor Leagues between 1957 and 1962. Verble passed away on Nov. 4, 2017 in Kannapolis, N.C.

Hector Wagner was born Nov. 26, 1968 in San Juan de la Maguana, Dominican Republic and spent his two seasons in the Major Leagues with the Kansas City Royals as a right-handed pitcher. Signed by the Royals as an amateur free agent in 1986, Wagner had seven appearances and posted a 7.83 ERA. Wagner passed away on June 5, 2017 in Clifton, N.J.

Danny Walton was born July 14, 1947 in Los Angeles and played for nine seasons spending time with the Houston Astros, Seattle Pilots, Milwaukee Brewers, New York Yankees, Minnesota Twins, Los Angeles Dodgers and Texas Rangers. A utility player, Walton appeared in 297 games and collected 174 hits with a .223 batting average. Walton passed away on Aug. 9, 2017 in Morgan, UT.

Steve Waterbury was born on April 6, 1952 in Carbondale, Ill. and pitched for one season with the St. Louis Cardinals. Waterbury made five appearances with the team and posted a 6.00 ERA. He passed away on May 19, 2017 in Marion, Ill.

Daniel Webb was born Aug. 18, 1989 in Paducah, Ky. and pitched for four season with the Chicago White Sox. Webb made his Major League debut on Sept. 4, 2013 against the New York Yankees recording a scoreless inning of relief work. In 2014, Webb made Chicago's Opening Day roster and went 6-5 with a 3.99 ERA and 58 strikes in 57 appearances with the White Sox. Webb passed away on Oct. 14, 2017 in Waverly, Tenn.

Ken Wright was born on Sept. 4, 1946, in Pensacola, Fla. and pitched for five seasons in the big leagues. A right-handed pitcher, Wright appeared in 113 games, compiling a record of 11-15 and an ERA of 4.54 over 236 innings pitched. Wright's best season was in 1971, when he posted an ERA of 3.69 over 78 innings pitched. Wright passed away on Jan. 21, 2017.

Tom Wright was born on Sept. 22, 1923 in Rutherfordton, N.C. was a pinch hitter and outfielder for nine seasons with the Boston Red Sox, St. Louis Browns, Chicago White Sox and Washington Senators. Before his Major League career, Wright spent three years in the United States Air Force in the South Pacific during World War II in the Philippines. Wright finished his career with a .255 batting average and appeared in 341 games. He passed away on Sept. 5, 2017 in Shelby, N.C.

Anthony Young was born on Jan. 19, 1966 in Houston, Texas and pitched for six years with the New York Mets, Chicago Cubs and Houston Astros. Aside from baseball, Young played football as a defensive back in college at the University of Houston and was then signed as the 38th round pick in the 1987 amateur draft by the Mets. In Jan. 2017, it was announced that Young had an inoperable brain tumor to which he succumbed on June 27, 2017 after falling into a coma the day prior. Young passed away in Houston, Texas.

Dom Zanni was born on March 1, 1932 in Bronx, N.Y. and pitched for seven seasons in the big leagues spending time between the San Francisco Giants, Chicago White Sox and Cincinnati Reds. While with the White Sox, he had his best season in 1962 going 6-5 with five saves in 44 appearances. Zanni retired in Massapequa, N.Y. after spending 27 years in the insurance business and passed away there on July 6, 2017.

Jose Zardon was born on May 20, 1923, in La Habana, Cuba and appeared in 54 games for the Washington Senators in 1945. A right-handed outfielder, Zardon was a solid hitter, collecting 38 hits in 131 big league at-bats. Zardon passed away on March 21, 2017, in Tamarac, Fla.

Bob Zick was born on April 26, 2917 in Chicago and played for one year as a pitcher and pinch runner with the Chicago Cubs in 1954. After his baseball career ended, Zick became a regional sales manager for the Verson Press Company which manufactured metal stamping presses. Zick passed away on June 12, 2017 in Sun City, Ariz.