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The GRAMMY Museum announced a 'Popular Music and the National Pastime' exhibit and it looks great

via GRAMMY Museum

Baseball and music have a lengthy history together, and beginning in mid-March, fans will be able to experience a richly detailed and meticulously researched exhibit celebrating the deep connection between the two. 

The GRAMMY Museum in Los Angeles will launch a new exhibit titled "Take Me Out To The Ball Game: Popular Music And The National Pastime" on March 14, and it will run through the end of the upcoming MLB season. 

The launch is perfectly timed, as the GRAMMY Hall of Fame recently announced that Edward Meeker with the Edison Orchestra's 1908 recording of "Take Me Out to the Ball Game" is among its 2019 inductees. 

Exploring the intersection of baseball and music is at the forefront of the exhibit, which will feature a number of remarkable historical items, including (but not limited to):

Sheet music from the early years of baseball, including "Take Me Out to the Ball Game"

Handwritten lyrics to classic baseball songs like James Taylor's "Angels of Fenway"

Special Fender guitars, including the Jackie Robinson Telecaster (pictured atop this post)

Harry Caray's microphone

Limited edition vinyl records, photographs, posters and more

More, per the GRAMMY Museum's website:

"Take Me Out To The Ball Game: Popular Music And The National Pastime will offer insight and historical reference for the history of music in baseball. The exhibit takes you on a journey starting before the 20th century when interest in baseball-themed music was fostered through the sales of sheet music, then explains the rise of baseball songs becoming a part of a new era of American music in the early 1900s, to current day popular music being a central part of players preparing to take the field and excite the fans. All forms of music, from pop and jazz, to country, R&B, and rock and roll embraced America's baseball passion and are reflected throughout the exhibit."