Globe iconLogin iconRecap iconSearch iconTickets icon


MLB News

10 one-of-a-kind stat lines from MLB in 2017

After all these years, baseball still offers never-before-seen feats on a regular basis.

The 2017 season was no exception, featuring a slew of single-game performances that no player previously had produced -- at least since 1913, which is as far back as reliable box score data goes.

After all these years, baseball still offers never-before-seen feats on a regular basis.

The 2017 season was no exception, featuring a slew of single-game performances that no player previously had produced -- at least since 1913, which is as far back as reliable box score data goes.

Here is a look at 10 stat lines from this year -- five at the plate and five on the mound -- that fit that standard of originality.


Anthony Rendon's explosive afternoon
April 30 vs. Mets: 6-for-6, 5 R, 2B, 3 HR, 10 RBIs
Rendon actually got off to a slow start this year. But on the final day of April, one of the greatest offensive games in MLB history raised his OPS from .566 to .768 and sent him on his way to a sixth-place finish in the National League Most Valuable Player Award race. Rendon smacked a two-run single in the first off Mets starter Noah Syndergaard, then took advantage of four relievers for a solo homer, a three-run homer, a three-run double, a single, and another solo shot. The 10 RBIs set a Nationals/Expos franchise record, and Rendon joined Walker Cooper (1949) and Jim Bottomley ('24) as the only players to combine 10 RBIs with six hits. Rendon is the only member of that trio to rack up at least four extra-base hits in the process.

Scooter Gennett's launch party
June 6 vs. Cardinals: 5-for-5, 4 R, 4 HR, 10 RBIs
The Reds second baseman, selected off waivers from the Brewers in late March, became the 17th player in MLB history to homer four times in a game -- and he might have been the least likely of those based on track record. Gennett, who hit 35 homers in more than 1,500 at-bats from 2013-16, entered this game at Great American Ball Park riding a 39-game (16-start) homerless streak. That all changed in the most emphatic way possible. After a single in the first inning, Gennett smacked a grand slam in the third, a two-run shot in the fourth, a solo shot in the sixth, and another two-run blast in the eighth. He became the first player with at least five hits, four homers and 10 RBIs in one game.

Video: Must C Classic: Gennett's monster four-HR, 10-RBI day

J.D. Martinez takes and rakes
May 16 vs. Orioles: 2-for-3, 2 R, 2 HR, 5 RBI, 4 BB (2 IBB)
Yes, Martinez also homered four times in a game this year, on Sept. 4 for the D-backs at Dodger Stadium. But he had another standout performance as well, in his fourth game of the season after coming off the disabled list. Although the Tigers suffered a wild 13-11 loss in 13 innings, Martinez did about all he could by reaching base safely in six of seven plate appearances, including a go-ahead grand slam in the seventh inning. In his final two trips to the plate, in the 11th and 12th, Martinez was walked intentionally to load the bases. That made him the fourth player to homer twice and walk four times in a game, and the first of those to also drive in five runs.

Video: BAL@DET: J.D. Martinez blasts two homers against O's

Jose Altuve's one-man show
May 17 at Marlins: 4-for-5, 0 R, 2 2B, 2 3B, RBI
The American League MVP got plenty of help in 2017 as the Astros soared to a division title and a World Series championship. But on this particular afternoon in a 3-0 win in Miami, Altuve's teammates couldn't give him a lift home. The second baseman became the 14th player and first since 2005 to record at least two doubles and two triples in a game, but Houston stranded him in scoring position all four times. That made Altuve the third player to pound four extra-base hits without scoring a run, and the first of those to hit at least one triple.

Video: HOU@MIA: Altuve collects four extra-base hits

Brian Dozier wallops and whiffs
July 30 at A's: 1-for-6, R, HR, RBI, 5 K
Home runs and strikeouts are both up across the Majors these days, so this performance fit with the current all-or-nothing environment. Dozier was one of five players in 2017 to strike out five times in a game but just the third in history -- joining Sammy Sosa in 2000 and Ray Lankford in 1998 -- to combine five Ks with a homer. The Twins leadoff man was the first of those to finish with just one RBI, as he homered on the second pitch of the game before going down on strikes in each of his final five trips to the plate.

Masahiro Tanaka's strikeout spectacular
Sept. 29 vs. Blue Jays: 7 IP, 3 H, 0 R, 0 BB, 15 K
In one of Tanaka's several dominant performances during his decidedly up-and-down season for the Yankees, the right-hander struck out the side in the first inning and had multiple Ks in six of his seven frames. Tanaka tied Stephen Strasburg for the most strikeouts in a game in 2017 and became the 44th pitcher in history to pile up at least 15 Ks without issuing a walk. Of those, only Mike Mussina for the 2000 Orioles and Michael Pineda for the '15 Yankees had done so in just seven innings, but Tanaka's three hits allowed were the fewest in that exclusive club.

Video: TOR@NYY: Tanaka strikes out 15 over seven scoreless

An electric but erratic day for Carlos Martinez
April 15 at Yankees: 5 1/3 IP, 4 H, 3 R, 2 ER, 8 BB, 11 K
Only six times in 2017 did a pitcher manage to strike out 11 batters in a start of no more than 5 1/3 innings, and only three times did a pitcher walk eight in an outing of any length. Somehow, Martinez pulled off both of those feats in one game in the Bronx, collecting six strikeouts and six free passes in just the first two innings, with the Yankees not putting the ball in play until his 62nd pitch. Martinez became the first pitcher since Hall of Famer Randy Johnson in 1993 to reach at least eight walks and 11 strikeouts in a game and the first to do so in fewer than Herb Score's 6 1/3 frames in 1957.

Video: STL@NYY: Check out Martinez's 11 K's in 11 seconds

Washington runs wild on Jake Arrieta
June 27 at Nationals: 4 IP, 6 H, 6 R, 5 ER, 6 BB, 4 K, 7-for-7 SB
Of the 19 stolen bases Arrieta allowed in 2017, 37 percent came on this one rough night in D.C. Nats leadoff man Trea Turner took advantage of the right-hander -- and veteran catcher Miguel Montero -- for four swipes in first three innings, before teammates Rendon and Michael A. Taylor added three more in the fourth. It was the 21st time a pitcher gave up at least seven stolen bases in a game with a perfect success rate. The only other instance of it happening in an outing this brief came in 2009, when the Padres' Chris Young went three innings against the Rockies and allowed eight steals and eight runs.

Video: CHC@WSH: Turner, Taylor, Rendon set Nats team record

Jose Urena plays with fire
April 28 vs. Pirates: 4 1/3 IP, 12 H, 2 R, 2 ER, 1 BB, 1 K (in relief)
Urena took over for an ineffective Adam Conley in the second inning at Marlins Park and managed a rather remarkable feat while helping save Miami's bullpen. Urena, who moved into the rotation about a week later, became the first pitcher to allow 12 hits but just two runs in an appearance as short as 13 outs (though an inherited runner also scored). It helped that just two of the hits were for extra bases, and Urena generated three double-play grounders.

Video: PIT@MIA: Urena induces double play with bases loaded

Chad Green makes the most of his time
Aug. 30 vs. Indians: 2 2/3 IP, 1 H, 0 R, 0 BB, 7 K, 8 BF (in relief)
After making eight starts out of 12 appearances for the Yankees in his debut season in 2016, Green emerged as a force in the New York bullpen this year. The right-hander posted a 1.83 ERA and struck out 103 batters in 69 innings, with seven of those Ks coming in the first game of a doubleheader at Yankee Stadium. Green whiffed the first five Cleveland batters he faced, then allowed a double before finishing with another pair of strikeouts. He became the ninth pitcher to get to seven strikeouts in an outing of just 2 2/3 innings, and was the first to do so while facing no more than eight batters.

Andrew Simon is a research analyst for Follow him on Twitter @AndrewSimonMLB.