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Yanks to call up top prospect Gleyber Torres

Infielder set to come up before Sunday's game against Blue Jays
MLB.com

Yankees top prospect Gleyber Torres is headed to the big leagues. The 21-year-old infielder will join New York for Sunday's game against the Blue Jays at Yankee Stadium, a source told MLB.com's Mark Feinsand. The club has not confirmed.

Torres, baseball's No. 5 prospect per MLB Pipeline, was off to a hot start in the Minors this year, batting .370/.415/.543 with five extra-base hits and 11 RBIs in 13 games with Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre. Because Torres spent more than 20 days in the Minors, the Yankees delayed his free agency an additional year until after the 2024 season, meaning he will be under team control for seven years rather than six.

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Yankees top prospect Gleyber Torres is headed to the big leagues. The 21-year-old infielder will join New York for Sunday's game against the Blue Jays at Yankee Stadium, a source told MLB.com's Mark Feinsand. The club has not confirmed.

Torres, baseball's No. 5 prospect per MLB Pipeline, was off to a hot start in the Minors this year, batting .370/.415/.543 with five extra-base hits and 11 RBIs in 13 games with Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre. Because Torres spent more than 20 days in the Minors, the Yankees delayed his free agency an additional year until after the 2024 season, meaning he will be under team control for seven years rather than six.

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Torres was competing for the starting second-base job in Spring Training, but he was optioned to Triple-A on March 13. It's not yet clear how the Yankees intend to deploy Torres, but it's possible he supplants slumping infielder Tyler Wade. At Scranton/Wilkes-Barre, Torres has started eight of his 13 games at third base.

The last younger position player to debut for the Yankees at any time was Melky Cabrera, who debuted at 20 years, 330 days on July 7, 2005. The youngest position player to debut for the team before July 1 was Derek Jeter on May 29, 1995.

New York acquired Torres from the Cubs in July 2016 as part of the Aroldis Chapman deal. Torres ended that season by becoming the youngest Most Valuable Player and batting champion (.403) in Arizona Fall League history at age 19.

Chad Thornburg is a reporter for MLB.com based in Los Angeles.

New York Yankees, Gleyber Torres

Reddick hits 2nd slam of April, adds a solo shot

Outfielder first in club history with two slams in April, also hits solo HR
MLB.com @brianmctaggart

CHICAGO -- Astros outfielder Josh Reddick became the first player in franchise history to hit two grand slams in April when he clubbed his team-leading fifth homer of the year in the second inning Saturday. He was only getting started.

Reddick followed his second-inning grand slam with a leadoff homer in the fourth to put the Astros ahead, 10-0, for his eighth career multihomer game. His previous multihomer game came against the Orioles on April 3, when he also hit a grand slam.

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CHICAGO -- Astros outfielder Josh Reddick became the first player in franchise history to hit two grand slams in April when he clubbed his team-leading fifth homer of the year in the second inning Saturday. He was only getting started.

Reddick followed his second-inning grand slam with a leadoff homer in the fourth to put the Astros ahead, 10-0, for his eighth career multihomer game. His previous multihomer game came against the Orioles on April 3, when he also hit a grand slam.

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Grand slams mean 40% off pizza

The Astros, who entered the game having scored 30 runs in their previous four games, tallied four runs in the first inning against White Sox starter Lucas Giolito. Marwin Gonzalez had the big blow with a two-run, bases-loaded double that would have cleared the bases had it not bounced over the wall for a ground-rule double.

Video: HOU@CWS: Gonzalez hits a two-run ground-rule double

Giolito walked the first three batters he faced in the second inning -- George Springer, Jose Altuve and Carlos Correa -- and Reddick turned on the next pitch and sailed it 360 feet over the right-field wall.

The last Astros player to hit two grand slams in a month was Hall of Famer Jeff Bagwell in May 2001.

Brian McTaggart has covered the Astros since 2004, and for MLB.com since 2009. Follow @brianmctaggart on Twitter and listen to his podcast.

Houston Astros, Josh Reddick

Mets decide to shift Harvey to bullpen

MLB.com @AnthonyDiComo

ATLANTA -- The Mets allowed Matt Harvey to state his case, but in the end, there was no changing their minds. Nothing Harvey could say would sway the Mets from demoting him from the rotation to the bullpen, a move the team announced before Saturday's game against the Braves.

Mets officials colored it as a way for Harvey to work on his craft until they need him to start games again in the future. Just as Harvey could say nothing to influence the team, however, no words or platitudes could soothe his emotion.

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ATLANTA -- The Mets allowed Matt Harvey to state his case, but in the end, there was no changing their minds. Nothing Harvey could say would sway the Mets from demoting him from the rotation to the bullpen, a move the team announced before Saturday's game against the Braves.

Mets officials colored it as a way for Harvey to work on his craft until they need him to start games again in the future. Just as Harvey could say nothing to influence the team, however, no words or platitudes could soothe his emotion.

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"On a scale of 1 to 10, obviously I'm at a 10 with being pissed off," Harvey said, clarifying that he's angry both at the Mets and at himself. "My performance hasn't been there, and I just have to do whatever I have to do to get back in the starting rotation. Right now, that's go to the bullpen and work on some things, get things back to where I need to be."

Exclusively a starting pitcher throughout his professional career, Harvey's rotation status came into question when, after the right-hander allowed six runs in six innings on Thursday in Atlanta, Callaway declined to guarantee him another start. With Jason Vargas set to come off the disabled list next Saturday in San Diego, the Mets needed to shift someone out of the rotation. Zack Wheeler and Steven Matz, Callaway indicated, have both pitched well enough to stay.

Video: NYM@ATL: Harvey gets Inciarte looking

That left Harvey, whom the Mets could either demote to the bullpen or to the Minors -- the latter of which he could contractually refuse. Rather than broach that option, the Mets decided to move him to the bullpen, hoping he can grow from the experience.

"I want to make it clear: This is less about making Matt a reliever and more about getting him back to being a productive starter," assistant general manager John Ricco said. "Honestly, one of the reasons we brought in Mickey and [pitching coach] Dave Eiland were for their knowledge and expertise in this area. We have a lot of faith and confidence in what they're able to do."

The Mets' twin pitching gurus are no strangers to bullpen conversions; Callaway was involved in similar decisions with Carlos Carrasco, Trevor Bauer and Danny Salazar in Cleveland, while Eiland's resume includes Danny Duffy and Wade Davis in Kansas City. All but Davis, who went on to become one of the Majors' best closers, returned to their respective rotations in short order.

Harvey will be available for the first time on Tuesday in St. Louis, and at least initially, the team will try to give him advance warning of his relief assignments. In the bullpen, the Mets hope, Harvey's history of control -- even with his struggles this year, he holds a 17-to-4 strikeout-to-walk ratio -- will help him succeed. They anticipate his average fastball and slider velocities will increase from what are currently career-low levels.

Tweet from @AnthonyDiComo: Matt Harvey's fastball and slider velocities are both down more than a full mph from last year. His fastball is also more than 4 mph slower than its 2013 peak. #Mets pic.twitter.com/cyQe8xI9yu

But multiple Mets officials painted Harvey's struggles -- he is 0-2 with a 6.00 ERA in four starts, and 5-9 with a 6.57 ERA since last season -- as more mental than physical. Harvey said on Friday that he is suffering no ill effects from his 2016 surgery to correct thoracic outlet syndrome, nor from the resulting shoulder weakness that afflicted him last summer.

"We know he's healthy," Ricco said. "He's feeling good. Then you get to, is this a little bit of a mental thing, a confidence thing? One of the things we talk about is getting him into the 'pen, where he can have success in short spurts, get that confidence back and really let it go and get back to being a guy who can dominate the way he's shown in the past."

Added Harvey: "I know when things click that I can be one of the best in baseball, and that's as a starting pitcher. Obviously, I didn't show that. I have to do everything I can to get back to where I want to be and be as dominant as I have been."

When Callaway and Eiland informed Harvey of their decision, he argued that point, reiterating that something clicked for him in retiring 11 of the final 12 batters he faced on Thursday. The Mets don't doubt that. Nor are they concerned that their decision left him, in Callaway's words, "pissed off right now, and motivated to show everybody that he can be a starter."

"It's a big decision," Callaway said. "Matt Harvey has pitched in meaningful games for the Mets in his career, and he's done some special things. I knew it wasn't going to be the most comfortable conversation. It's a tough message, but it sounds like he's going to embrace it, and go out there and get the job done."

Anthony DiComo has covered the Mets for MLB.com since 2007. Follow him on Twitter @AnthonyDiComo, Instagram and Facebook.

New York Mets, Matt Harvey

Farquhar stable after ruptured brain aneurysm

Messages of support pour in for White Sox reliever in critical condition
MLB.com @scottmerkin

CHICAGO -- The focus of the White Sox clubhouse Saturday centered on reliever Danny Farquhar and really nothing more, with tests revealing he suffered a brain hemorrhage during the sixth inning of Friday night's 10-0 loss to the Astros at Guaranteed Rate Field.

Farquhar collapsed in the White Sox dugout after facing four batters, and the additional overnight testing at RUSH University Medical Center revealed that a ruptured aneurysm caused the brain bleed, according to the White Sox. Farquhar is currently stable but in critical condition in the neurosurgical ICU unit at RUSH and continues to receive treatment and close monitoring by Dr. Demetrius Lopes and the neurosurgical team.

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CHICAGO -- The focus of the White Sox clubhouse Saturday centered on reliever Danny Farquhar and really nothing more, with tests revealing he suffered a brain hemorrhage during the sixth inning of Friday night's 10-0 loss to the Astros at Guaranteed Rate Field.

Farquhar collapsed in the White Sox dugout after facing four batters, and the additional overnight testing at RUSH University Medical Center revealed that a ruptured aneurysm caused the brain bleed, according to the White Sox. Farquhar is currently stable but in critical condition in the neurosurgical ICU unit at RUSH and continues to receive treatment and close monitoring by Dr. Demetrius Lopes and the neurosurgical team.

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There was no discussion among the White Sox about not playing Saturday night against the Astros because of what had happened to their friend, and the team hung his jersey in the bullpen. There was plenty of conversation about thoughts and prayers for the 31-year-old Farquhar, his wife, Lexi, and their three children, Madison, Landon and Liam.

"It crushes us in this clubhouse, and nothing really matters baseball-wise when something like that happens," White Sox starter James Shields said. "When you see one of your brothers go down like that, it's not very fun to watch. He's such a resilient human being and we're praying for him. We hope everything goes well."

Tweet from @whitesox: ������ pic.twitter.com/JPC9IrNMqU

"He's alive, he's got a chance and that's what I'm hanging on to," White Sox pitching coach Don Cooper said. "And prayers are more necessary than talk."

Additional updates will be provided by the White Sox on Farquhar's health over the coming days as appropriate. But the club also asks that the privacy of the Farquhar family be respected at this time. Social media messages of hope from around baseball quickly came in for Farquhar, including from Cubs first baseman Anthony Rizzo and his former teams from Tampa Bay and Seattle.

Tweet from @ARizzo44: Prayers for @whitesox Danny Farquhar. Another reminder how precious life is. Stay strong and keep fighting. My thoughts are with his family.

Houston shortstop Carlos Correa and manager AJ Hinch also talked about the tragedy hitting Farquhar during the course of Friday's game.

"It really is sad. I saw something going on when I was at shortstop in the dugout, but I didn't know what it was," Correa said. "I came here to watch my video and they told me that something happened to him. I asked the clubbies here what happened to him, and they didn't know at the time. Now that I know about the aneurysm and stuff, it's really sad. I'm wishing him the best, praying for him. Hopefully he gets better soon."

Tweet from @whitesox: Statement on Danny Farquhar. White Sox fans, please keep Danny and his family in your positive thoughts and prayers. pic.twitter.com/4DdwnXbVXd

"I texted back and forth with [White Sox manager Rick Renteria], and it was a scary incident last night," Hinch said. "We could see across the way something was going on, and I think some of our guys saw him vomit, and then as the group went around him, it just became a scary scene. Then word trickles back, and then this morning getting that update is very scary. Obviously, our thoughts and prayers are with his family and him, the White Sox, the team."

Video: Shields, Santiago pray for teammate Farquhar

Right-handed reliever Gregory Infante replaced Farquhar on the active roster, with Farquhar being placed on the 10-day disabled list. Renteria met with the White Sox early on Saturday, and the team will try to move on while always carrying thoughts of hope for Farquhar, who received immediate treatment from the White Sox medical staff and EMTs on Friday.

"We've got a good group of guys here and we're going to stick together," Shields said. "He's definitely stable from what we hear, but he's got a long way to go and he's fighting. One thing we know in this clubhouse is that Farqy, he's a fighter."

"Pray for him, pray for his family, pray for his kids," White Sox reliever Hector Santiago said. "We're in here worrying about him, but you can only do so much from our side of it, so just pray for the family and him and hope for the best."

"You don't lose sight of the reality of the circumstance and the situation he's in," said Renteria, who makes his offseason home in Temecula, Calif., as does Farquhar. "But these men know they can go out there and show him that they are thinking about him by the way they go about doing their business today."

Scott Merkin has covered the White Sox for MLB.com since 2003. Read his blog, Merk's Works, follow him on Twitter @scottmerkin, on Facebook and listen to his podcast.

Chicago White Sox, Danny Farquhar

Judge crushes No. 6; now fastest to 62

Staying ahead of McGwire's pace, Yanks slugger is fastest to reach 62 career homers; goes deep on 3-0 pitch for first time
MLB.com @BryanHoch

NEW YORK -- Brick by brick, Aaron Judge is continuing to add to an impressive list of career accomplishments.

Issued the green light on a 3-0 count on Saturday afternoon, Judge crushed a two-run homer off of Marcus Stroman, producing the first two runs of the Yankees' 9-1 victory over the Blue Jays at Yankee Stadium. He scored on a catching error in New York's seven-run sixth inning, then capped the frame with an RBI single.

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NEW YORK -- Brick by brick, Aaron Judge is continuing to add to an impressive list of career accomplishments.

Issued the green light on a 3-0 count on Saturday afternoon, Judge crushed a two-run homer off of Marcus Stroman, producing the first two runs of the Yankees' 9-1 victory over the Blue Jays at Yankee Stadium. He scored on a catching error in New York's seven-run sixth inning, then capped the frame with an RBI single.

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"It's just about little by little, getting better every single day," Judge said. "You're not going to try to make big strides every single day. It's like laying a brick down when you're building a house. You lay one brick down at a time and just try to be consistent, and try to do that every day."

Judge joked that he sometimes does not look down the third-base line to see if the take sign has been issued, though in this case, manager Aaron Boone had him swinging away.

Video: TOR@NYY: Judge extends rally with RBI single to left

Given carte blanche to hack, Judge teed off on Stroman's 92.6-mph fastball, connecting for his sixth homer of the year and his fourth career shot off Stroman. It came off of Judge's bat at 116.1 mph, making it the ninth-hardest-hit homer of his career.

Projected by Statcast™ to have traveled 443 feet to left field, the homer was the first of Judge's career on a 3-0 count, the only count he had not yet homered on. He had been 1-for-3 with an RBI in those situations.

"I always want to hit 3-0, especially against a guy like Stroman," Judge said. "You're not going to get too many good pitches to hit, and he's going to command his pitches well in the zone. He's got some nasty stuff, some of the best stuff in the league. On 3-0, if he's going to give me one that's somewhat over the plate, I've got to take a chance at it."

After three weeks of watching Judge from the Yankees dugout, Boone said that Judge is a better player than he had imagined.

Video: TOR@NYY: Judge safe at home on Maile's missed catch

"I knew 52 home runs, Rookie of the Year, a guy that gets on more than 40 percent of the time," Boone said. "I understand he's an elite-level hitter when you look at those numbers, but I'm so impressed with how well he knows himself and how he develops a game plan going into the game.

"I think he's very in tune with the mechanics of his swing, which I'm sure is more of a challenge for a guy that size. He's clearly, to me, one of the best players in the league."

Video: Watch all of Judge's record-breaking 62 homers

The shot also marked Judge's 62nd career home run in 201 games played, keeping ahead of Mark McGwire's 1986-88 pace for the fastest to reach the number. Judge was also the fastest to 60 and 61 home runs. McGwire hit his 62nd homer in his 205th career game.

"I was just excited to get two runs on the board against a tough pitcher like Stroman," Judge said. "A guy like that, you can't take any pitches off. He could go eight no-hit [innings] every single time he pitches. You've got to stay ready even if it's 0-0, 1-0, 3-0. You've just got to be ready to attack and don't miss the pitch. He might give you one to hit, and you just can't miss it."

Bryan Hoch has covered the Yankees for MLB.com since 2007. Follow him on Twitter @bryanhoch and on Facebook.

New York Yankees, Aaron Judge

Nola dazzles, Hoskins muscles up in Phils' win

Starters have allowed three earned runs or fewer in 11 consecutive games
Special to MLB.com

PHILADELPHIA -- On a chilly Saturday afternoon at Citizens Bank Park, the Phillies just needed to practice patience and hope that at some point, a break would fall their way.

"Patience means ultimately, you are going to get a pitch to hit," Phillies manager Gabe Kapler said. "It may not be in this at-bat, or even the next at-bat, but at some point very soon you are going to get a very good pitch to hit. [Pitchers] are going to make mistakes. They are human."

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PHILADELPHIA -- On a chilly Saturday afternoon at Citizens Bank Park, the Phillies just needed to practice patience and hope that at some point, a break would fall their way.

"Patience means ultimately, you are going to get a pitch to hit," Phillies manager Gabe Kapler said. "It may not be in this at-bat, or even the next at-bat, but at some point very soon you are going to get a very good pitch to hit. [Pitchers] are going to make mistakes. They are human."

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That break came in the sixth of the Phillies' 6-2 win, and no one benefitted more than starter Aaron Nola. The right-hander continued an 8-game stretch of performances where he allowed two earned runs or fewer, dating back to Sept. 13 of last season.

Despite a lead-off home run by Pirates second baseman Sean Rodriguez, Nola (2-1) was up to standard in against the Pirates, striking out nine batters on 103 pitches, 75 of which were strikes.

Video: PIT@PHI: Nola fans nine over seven strong innings

"I felt pretty good today against lefties and righties," said Nola, who improved to 2-1 on the year with a 2.30 ERA.

In the sixth, Phillies first baseman Carlos Santana appeared to get hit by a pitch, but home-plate umpire Lance Barrett signaled the pitch a ball. The Phillies asked for a replay and after a 45 second review, the call was overturned and Santana was awarded first base.

Video: PIT@PHI: Santana gets HBP on overturned call in 6th

A single by Odubel Herrera, who has now reached base safely a career-high 22 straight games, put runners on the corners and put an end to Pirates starter Steven Brault's day, as reliever Michael Feliz was called into action from the bullpen.

Video: PIT@PHI: Herrera reaches base for 22nd straight game

Phillies left fielder Rhys Hoskins stepped into the batter's box and, on a 1-2 pitch, hit his fourth home run of the season on the seventh pitch of the at-bat against Feliz, giving the Phillies a 3-2 lead. The Phillies have notched three straight wins against the Pirates, in which they have allowed just three runs.

"It always feels like he is in [command at the plate]," Kapler said. "It feels like he's dominating that at bat. Even if he is down 0-2, ok [fine], let's just wait to see him get back in this count and hang in there for a pitch he can drive in the alley, or out of the park."

I think our first thought is there is no panic at all," said Hoskins, who has hit .417 (8-for-17) with two home runs and two doubles in 0-2 or 1-2 counts. "With our approach we've worked on all year, the way we are swinging even though the results may not be there, there is no panic at all. It's gotten into late innings and we just keep grinding away.

"Usually if you take a couple of balls down the middle, you don't get another one. I got away with an at-bat there. I got lucky to see another pitch, and I hit a pretty good pitch."

Philadelphia secured a series win over its cross-state rivals, and looks for a sweep in the finale of the four-game series set for Sunday afternoon.

MOMENT THAT MATTERED
Holding a one run lead, Nola looked close to being done after a two-out single brought Jordy Mercer to the plate with two-out in the seventh. Nola battled as Mercer hit several hard foul balls to both sides of the field. On the seventh pitch of the at-bat -- the 103rd of his afternoon -- Nola struck out Mercer with a changeup in the dirt to preserve a 3-2 lead.

"I don't think I was running on fumes," Nola said. "I think in that at-bat the changeup was the pitch to go with, and it worked."

SOUND SMART
The Phillies recent success has been, in large part, due to a rotation that has kept them in games. In each of the last 11 games, Phillies starters have allowed three or less runs in each contest. The rotation has an ERA of 2.34 during the stretch, the longest such streak since 2011, when the rotation went 13 starts without allowing three or fewer runs.

HE SAID IT
"Obviously we had that nice little moment when the crowd cheered and we knew the Sixers won their game. That's cool for all of us in our dugout as well," -- Kapler, acknowledging the Sixers 106-102 win against Miami in the first round of the NBA playoffs.

UP NEXT
The Phillies will look to sweep their home series against the Pirates in the final game of a four-game series. The Pirates will go with 26-year-old right-hander Trevor Williams, who has been dominant over his first four starts of the year. Williams is coming off his first loss of the season after three straight wins, but the Phillies have been stingy as well, having allowed just three runs over the first three games.

Mike Radano is a contributor to MLB.com and is based in Philadelphia.

Philadelphia Phillies, Rhys Hoskins

Moncada pulled after 2nd inning by Renteria

MLB.com @scottmerkin

CHICAGO -- White Sox second baseman Yoan Moncada was removed from Saturday's game against the Astros at Guaranteed Rate Field after the second inning. The move was termed a manager's decision made by Rick Renteria.

Moncada grounded out to third baseman Alex Bregman for the second out of the inning but appeared to slow down momentarily as he moved down the line. Bregman's throw was off-line, but first baseman Yuli Gurriel was able to apply the tag. Renteria stresses hustling at all times, most likely leading to Leury Garcia replacing Moncada in the third inning with Houston holding an 8-0 lead.

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CHICAGO -- White Sox second baseman Yoan Moncada was removed from Saturday's game against the Astros at Guaranteed Rate Field after the second inning. The move was termed a manager's decision made by Rick Renteria.

Moncada grounded out to third baseman Alex Bregman for the second out of the inning but appeared to slow down momentarily as he moved down the line. Bregman's throw was off-line, but first baseman Yuli Gurriel was able to apply the tag. Renteria stresses hustling at all times, most likely leading to Leury Garcia replacing Moncada in the third inning with Houston holding an 8-0 lead.

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Moncada batted sixth on Saturday, marking the first time this season he was not in the leadoff position.

Scott Merkin has covered the White Sox for MLB.com since 2003. Read his blog, Merk's Works, follow him on Twitter @scottmerkin, on Facebook and listen to his podcast.

Chicago White Sox, Yoan Moncada

Turner 'getting better' but not ready to swing

Dodgers third baseman rehabbing broken left wrist
MLB.com @kengurnick

LOS ANGELES -- Justin Turner said on Saturday he still has not begun swinging a bat, clarifying a miscommunication that resulted in Friday reports that he was hitting off a tee.

Turner said he still has pain making certain movements, but emphasized that his fractured left wrist continues to heal without a setback.

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LOS ANGELES -- Justin Turner said on Saturday he still has not begun swinging a bat, clarifying a miscommunication that resulted in Friday reports that he was hitting off a tee.

Turner said he still has pain making certain movements, but emphasized that his fractured left wrist continues to heal without a setback.

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"It's getting better every day and it's been a good week as far as range of motion and pain tolerance, but not there yet," Turner said to reporters. "When I hit a ball off a tee, I'll be the first one to stand here and let you guys know. I'll send a tweet and tag you guys. Maybe you can get some followers."

Turner suffered the small, non-displaced fracture when hit by a Kendall Graveman pitch on March 19. He will hit the five-week mark on Monday and was originally told a fracture takes about six weeks to calcify.

In Turner's absence, the Dodgers have started Logan Forsythe, Kyle Farmer, Enrique Hernandez and Max Muncy at third base. Combined, the third basemen rank 15th in the NL with a .174 average and 14th with a .551 OPS.

Stewart set for callup?
Manager Dave Roberts said on Saturday said he won't announce a starting pitcher for Monday night until Sunday, but it's looking like Brock Stewart could get a callup from Triple-A Oklahoma City to face the Marlins at Dodger Stadium.

Roberts said it won't be a bullpen game and a current Dodgers reliever won't start, which would leave Stewart and Walker Buehler as the most likely candidates.

Buehler is still listed as Sunday's starter for Oklahoma City, having last pitched on Monday. Stewart last pitched on Wednesday and Monday would be his regular day to start, but he is not listed as an OKC probable for either Monday or Tuesday.

Stewart threw 5 2/3 innings and 85 pitches in his last start, while Buehler went four innings and threw 80 pitches in his last outing.

Ken Gurnick has covered the Dodgers for MLB.com since 2001.

Los Angeles Dodgers, Justin Turner

Fowler's daughter loves her dad's bobblehead

On Saturday, the Cardinals held a bobblehead giveaway for Dexter Fowler. This was his first ever gate giveaway in an MLB stadium in addition to being his first bobblehead. The outfielder was excited about the event, but it was his daughter Naya who had the most adorable reaction to it.

Clevinger shuts out O's, allows just 2 singles

Tribe's slumping offense breaks out with 3 home runs
Special to MLB.com

BALTIMORE -- With a clubhouse full of pitching valedictorians, Mike Clevinger is testing himself every time he steps on the mound.

"If you're in class and everyone is making a 90 and you're making a 60 on the test, how good is that going to feel every single day?" Clevinger said. "Eventually, you're at least going to get to that 80 grade, and that's what the cool thing is about Corey Kluber and Carlos Carrasco. They're setting the bar so high that even falling just a little bit short, you're going to be pretty damn good."

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BALTIMORE -- With a clubhouse full of pitching valedictorians, Mike Clevinger is testing himself every time he steps on the mound.

"If you're in class and everyone is making a 90 and you're making a 60 on the test, how good is that going to feel every single day?" Clevinger said. "Eventually, you're at least going to get to that 80 grade, and that's what the cool thing is about Corey Kluber and Carlos Carrasco. They're setting the bar so high that even falling just a little bit short, you're going to be pretty damn good."

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Saturday at Camden Yards, Clevinger took the Orioles to school, putting together arguably the best performance of his career, a two-hit shutout that propelled the Indians to a 4-0 victory.

"I'll tell you what," manager Terry Francona said, "That was really fun to watch."

Video: CLE@BAL: Ramirez cranks a solo homer to right field

Clevinger's dominant performance was boosted by solo home runs from Yan Gomes, Jose Ramirez and Yonder Alonso, as Cleveland continued its reliance on the long ball as the rest of its offense struggles.

At the start, Clevinger didn't seem to be on track for a dominant performance, as the Orioles made several loud outs in the first few innings and the Indians' starter struggled with his pitch count.

"It started off rough," Clevinger said. "I had 60 pitches through three [innings] and that wasn't efficient at all. I was trying to figure out a way to get deep into the game."

Clevinger's only issue came in the fourth, when he allowed a leadoff single to Manny Machado, and Chris Davis followed with a grounder into the shift that Francisco Lindor misplayed for a rare error, giving Baltimore first and third with no outs. But Clevinger bore down, getting Tim Beckham on a shallow fly to left and inducing a ground-ball out from Anthony Santander to get out of the inning.

Video: CLE@BAL: Clevinger retires Santander to elude trouble

"It seemed like from there, he just started pounding the zone," Francona said. "He got a couple of first-pitch outs of innings, which is always really good, and started using all his pitches."

After giving up a sixth-inning single, Clevinger finished by retiring the final 14 batters he faced, often in quick fashion, as he and Gomes were in rhythm all game.

"The way Yan was calling and setting up the game, it kind of put them in attack mode later in the game," Clevinger said.

The first complete game of Clevinger's career stands in contrast to his last outing, in which he squandered a four-run lead in a no-decision against Toronto. After seven days off, Clevinger came back with a renewed focus, and the effort showed.

"He's been able to stick to his game plans and throw his plus pitches out there," Gomes said. "His progress and everything that he's doing has been really fun to watch."

Video: CLE@BAL: Gomes drills a solo home run to left in 4th

MOMENT THAT MATTERED
Not only did Ramirez go 3-for-4 with a long home run, he made a fantastic defensive play in the eighth inning, diving to his left and getting up to make a perfect strike to first to rob Craig Gentry of a hit, continuing to show the value of both his bat and his glove.

"He's a good defender wherever we put him and it's nice to see him swing the bat too," Francona said. "We need him. He's so important to what we're doing."

Video: CLE@BAL: Ramirez lays out to take a hit from Gentry

YOU GOTTA SEE THIS
Alonso became the first player this season to hit a home run over the right-field fence and onto Eutaw Street with his sixth-inning blast that gave Cleveland a 4-0 lead. Alonso is just the 54th visiting player and 94th player overall to hit the street. The 414-foot home run had an exit velocity of 112.3 mph, according to Statcast™.

Video: CLE@BAL: Alonso demolishes a solo homer to right

HE SAID IT
"He's got a lot of life on his fastball. I don't think we struck out, what, two or three times all day? Is that true? I'm not sure if I had it right. Three. So, he got a lot of balls on the ground." -- Orioles manager Buck Showalter, on Clevinger

UP NEXT
Corey Kluber (2-1, 1.52 ERA) gets the start in Game 3, a 1:05 p.m. ET matchup against the Orioles' Andrew Cashner. Kluber tallied a shutout in his prior outing at Camden Yards, last June 19. Kluber, who has 1,234 strikeouts, needs just one more strikeout to tie Charles Nagy for sixth on the franchise's all-time K's list.

Elliott Smith is a contributor to MLB.com based in Baltimore.

Cleveland Indians, Yonder Alonso, Mike Clevinger, Yan Gomes, Jose Ramirez

Play Ball, Chevrolet host clinic in Compton

Special to MLB.com

COMPTON, Calif. -- Major League Baseball's Play Ball and Chevy Youth Baseball joined together at Major League Baseball's Compton Youth Academy to dedicate its newly renovated youth field and to register nearly 150 kids ages 5-12 to participate in the Play Ball initiative.

The Compton Youth Academy was opened in 2006, and Chevrolet through its Chevy Youth Baseball program has been a sponsor since the academy was established. Saturday's event recognized Chevrolet's latest donation of $158,040, which allowed the academy to renovate one of its youth fields with a new synthetic turf covering both the infield and outfield, plus the installation of lights later this summer.

COMPTON, Calif. -- Major League Baseball's Play Ball and Chevy Youth Baseball joined together at Major League Baseball's Compton Youth Academy to dedicate its newly renovated youth field and to register nearly 150 kids ages 5-12 to participate in the Play Ball initiative.

The Compton Youth Academy was opened in 2006, and Chevrolet through its Chevy Youth Baseball program has been a sponsor since the academy was established. Saturday's event recognized Chevrolet's latest donation of $158,040, which allowed the academy to renovate one of its youth fields with a new synthetic turf covering both the infield and outfield, plus the installation of lights later this summer.

The Chevrolet Youth Sports programs have reached 12.4 million youths since it began in 2006. In '17 alone, more than 748,000 kids participated on Chevrolet Youth Baseball and Softball teams across the nation.

Participating in the ribbon-cutting ceremony was Congresswoman Nanette Diaz Barragan, the 44th District's representative and second baseman for the Democratic Congressional Baseball Team.

"I played baseball as a kid myself and had to petition the principal to allow me to play on my high school's boys team," Barragan said. "If I can inspire our young boys and girls to be active and to play ball, that's what I'll do. I love the game."

As Erika Wirkkala, Chevrolet's representative at the event, said, "Chevrolet is really interested and dedicated to empowering today's youth through these programs and the MLB Youth Academy. We know that after-school programs such as these really help children learn life skills such as sportsmanship, perseverance and how to win and lose with dignity."

Chevrolet has been a longtime partner with MLB. Darrell Miller, vice president of youth and facility development, is impressed with Chevy's level of commitment to the Play Ball initiative.

"At the top level, Chevrolet wanted to do field renovations with MLB and now they are the national Play Ball sponsor because they really understand it," Miller said. "Baseball, apple pie, Chevrolet -- we've already said it. More importantly, they see the value of investing locally in all the academy. ... They've also done [a program] in Philadelphia and are doing more."

After the dedication, the kids were broken up into groups to participate in baseball-related activities at 10 different stations. Those activities include running, hitting, throwing, fielding, agility training and a short game. Each child who participated received a Play Ball T-shirt, Franklin plastic and foam bat-and-ball sets and lunch.

The smiles and excitement on the kids' faces alone was enough to make the event a success. The ongoing support that MLB and Chevrolet provide to the academy and the local community was summed up by 9-year-old Christopher Wilson, who said, "This program means a lot to me because I'm a big fan of baseball and I really like this academy."

While the obvious goal is to get more kids involved in baseball, Wirkkala said that it was much more than that for Chevrolet.

"Certainly, the hope is that we will encourage more boys and girls to get involved in the sport, but we also really want to stress that Chevrolet cares deeply about the communities that it serves, and this is just one manifestation of that commitment to our communities," Wirkkala said.

Miller said that Chevrolet's commitment to youth and inner-city baseball as a national sponsor of Play Ball has gotten more kids to play baseball who've never played the game before.

"That's really our sweet spot from the Commissioner's perspective," Miller said. "We want more kids to be playing the sport, letting people know that baseball is the greatest sport ever created, they're going to love it, and they're going to learn the lessons of life that sports can teach, but more specifically, baseball is the best mediator of those lessons."

Glenn Rabney is a contributor for MLB.com.

What to expect from Torres in big leagues

MLB.com @JimCallisMLB

A year after benefitting from one of the best rookie performances in baseball history, the Yankees again are hoping that one of the game's top prospects will make an impact in New York.

He won't slam 52 homers like Aaron Judge did in 2017, but infielder Gleyber Torres has exceptional hitting ability. Ranked No. 5 on MLB Pipeline's Top 100 Prospects list, he'll join the Yankees for their Sunday afternoon game against the Blue Jays.

A year after benefitting from one of the best rookie performances in baseball history, the Yankees again are hoping that one of the game's top prospects will make an impact in New York.

He won't slam 52 homers like Aaron Judge did in 2017, but infielder Gleyber Torres has exceptional hitting ability. Ranked No. 5 on MLB Pipeline's Top 100 Prospects list, he'll join the Yankees for their Sunday afternoon game against the Blue Jays.

Torres is capable of playing shortstop (his primary position in the Minors), third base (where he has seen the most action this year in Triple-A) and second base. Though New York hasn't commented yet on what his role will be, the most obvious spot for him would be at second. The club has gotten little production out of Tyler Wade or Neil Walker, and while Ronald Torreyes has hit well in six starts there, Torres offers superior power and defense.

Video: Top Prospects: Gleyber Torres, SS, Yankees

Scouts considered Torres the top infielder available during the 2013-14 international signing period, and he has lived up to that billing since signing with the Cubs for $1.7 million out of Venezuela in July 2013. He has excelled everywhere he has gone, starting with ranking as the Class A Midwest League's top prospect and winning a championship in the Class A Advanced Carolina League in 2015, his first taste of full-season ball.

The key prospect in the four-player package the Yankees received when they sent Aroldis Chapman to the Cubs in July 2016, Torres finished that year as the youngest MVP and batting champion (.403) in Arizona Fall League history. He reached Triple-A last May at age 20 and was pushing for a promotion to New York a month later when he injured his left (non-throwing) elbow on a headfirst slide into home plate on June 17. An MRI revealed a torn ulnar collateral ligament that required Tommy John surgery and ended his season.

Torres went 7-for-32 (.219) in big league camp this spring but quickly regained his stroke once the Triple-A season started. In 14 games at Scranton/Wilkes-Barre, he batted .347/.393/.510 with one home run. He's a career .285/.362/.419 hitter in pro ball with 121 extra-base hits (24 homers) in 370 games.

Video: Boone on Torres' play in spring, future with Yankees

At age 21, Torres will be the second-youngest player in the Major Leagues. He's only 25 days older than the youngest, Ozzie Albies.

One of the best pure hitting prospects in baseball, Torres has lightning-fast hands that enable him to barrel balls with ease. He recognizes pitches well and rarely gets fooled, and he's advanced in his ability to make adjustments and use the entire field. He has steadily improved his power and his plate discipline as he has risen through the Minors.

Torres' hands are an asset on defense as well, as is his plus arm strength. He covers more ground than his average speed would suggest, and he's capable of playing a solid shortstop and perhaps an even better second or third base. Star shortstop Didi Gregorius isn't going anywhere, but Torres also could take over at third base if fellow rookie Miguel Andujar falters and Brandon Drury is slow to return from his migraine issues.

Torres should make an already formidable Yankees lineup even more dangerous. If he gets 300 at-bats this year, a reasonable expectation would be that he could hit .275 with 8-10 homers. Once he's playing regularly and in his prime, he should contend for batting titles and deliver 20-plus homers per season.

Jim Callis is a reporter for MLB.com. Follow @jimcallisMLB on Twitter. Listen to him on the weekly Pipeline Podcast.

New York Yankees

Crew closer Knebel ahead of schedule in recovery

Logan nears rehab assignment; Arcia sits after ankle causes exit
MLB.com @AdamMcCalvy

MILWAUKEE -- Brewers closer Corey Knebel was back pitching on a mound Saturday sooner than expected, but the club will be especially cautious during this phase of his comeback from a left hamstring injury, manager Craig Counsell said.

"He will throw more bullpens because this is where the injury happened," said Counsell, referencing Knebel going down after throwing a pitch against the Cubs on April 5. "We'll go a little slower in this segment of it.

View Full Game Coverage

MILWAUKEE -- Brewers closer Corey Knebel was back pitching on a mound Saturday sooner than expected, but the club will be especially cautious during this phase of his comeback from a left hamstring injury, manager Craig Counsell said.

"He will throw more bullpens because this is where the injury happened," said Counsell, referencing Knebel going down after throwing a pitch against the Cubs on April 5. "We'll go a little slower in this segment of it.

View Full Game Coverage

"But he saw the doctor [Friday] and the doctor green-lighted him throwing on the mound. So progress has been great so far."

Asked whether Knebel's mound session went well, Counsell said, "He walked off with a big smile, so, yeah."

Knebel threw one of two notable bullpen sessions Saturday. Left-hander Boone Logan threw 25 pitches, including some sliders, in the other, his second 'pen since suffering a left triceps strain in Spring Training. The next step is to face hitters on Tuesday in a simulated game.

"If that goes well, ship me out," Logan said.

Out for a Minor League rehab assignment, that is. The Brewers will probably test Logan in back-to-back outings in the Minors, which means Logan is likely to make at least 3-4 appearances before reinstatement to the Major League roster is in play.

Counsell didn't reveal a firm timetable for either Knebel or Logan returning to active duty for the Brewers.

Arcia sits
Shortstop Orlando Arcia said he could play if needed, but he was held out of batting practice and the starting lineup a day after rolling his ankle while hustling back to first base after an eighth-inning single in Friday's win over the Marlins.

Video: MIA@MIL: Arcia singles, leaves game with injury

With an off-day coming Monday before the Brewers begin a three-city road trip in Kansas City, Arcia might find himself on the bench again for Sunday's series finale against Miami.

"I don't think we're completely out of the woods yet," Counsell said. "We'll give him at least today, and then we'll see how he's doing going into that off-day. … We're going to give it a day or two and see how he progresses. Is he going to be ready for the Kansas City series? That's what we'd say."

Arcia was optimistic he wouldn't have to wait that long.

"I'm ready to play," he said. "That's the manager's decision. If it were up to me, I would play [Sunday], but the manager makes the decision."

Adam McCalvy has covered the Brewers for MLB.com since 2001. Follow him on Twitter @AdamMcCalvy and like him on Facebook.

Milwaukee Brewers, Corey Knebel

Yadi's go-ahead homer pushes Cards to win

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