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BREAKING: M's get Colome, Span from Rays

MLB.com @gregjohnsmlb

SEATTLE -- General manager Jerry Dipoto moved to bolster both the Mariners' bullpen and outfield depth on Friday with a two-for-two trade with the Rays, acquiring Tampa Bay closer Alex Colome and veteran center fielder Denard Span for Minor League starters Andrew Moore and Tommy Romero.

The Mariners are adding roughly $9 million in remaining 2018 salary with the two veterans, but they had about $12 million of payroll open up with the 80-game suspension of Robinson Cano.

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SEATTLE -- General manager Jerry Dipoto moved to bolster both the Mariners' bullpen and outfield depth on Friday with a two-for-two trade with the Rays, acquiring Tampa Bay closer Alex Colome and veteran center fielder Denard Span for Minor League starters Andrew Moore and Tommy Romero.

The Mariners are adding roughly $9 million in remaining 2018 salary with the two veterans, but they had about $12 million of payroll open up with the 80-game suspension of Robinson Cano.

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The Mariners already have an established closer in Edwin Diaz, but Colome adds another late-inning setup option to go with Juan Nicasio and Nick Vincent. The Mariners lost David Phelps to Tommy John surgery in the spring, so Colome essentially refills that role.

Greg Johns has covered the Mariners since 1997, and for MLB.com since 2011. Follow him on Twitter @GregJohnsMLB.

Tampa Bay Rays, Alex Colome, Denard Span

6 potential landing spots for Hanley

MLB.com @feinsand

Hanley Ramirez was designated for assignment by the Red Sox on Friday, bringing his stint in Boston to a close earlier than expected.

Assuming the Red Sox are unable to trade Ramirez -- and given the vesting option in his contract that would pay him $22 million in 2019 if he accrues 302 more plate appearances this season under his current contract, it seems far-fetched to think any team would deal for him -- then he'll be released next week and become a free agent.

Hanley Ramirez was designated for assignment by the Red Sox on Friday, bringing his stint in Boston to a close earlier than expected.

Assuming the Red Sox are unable to trade Ramirez -- and given the vesting option in his contract that would pay him $22 million in 2019 if he accrues 302 more plate appearances this season under his current contract, it seems far-fetched to think any team would deal for him -- then he'll be released next week and become a free agent.

Boston would have to pay Ramirez the balance of his $22 million salary this season, meaning his next club would owe nothing more than the prorated portion of the league minimum.

So where might Ramirez wind up? Although the Red Sox decided they had better options on their roster, there are plenty of teams that could use Ramirez's bat in their lineup or on their bench.

Here's a look at a half-dozen clubs that could make a play for Ramirez if (when?) he hits the open market.

Twins
Joe Mauer landed on the DL last week with a cervical neck strain and concussion-like symptoms, taking the first baseman/designated hitter out of Minnesota's lineup for the foreseeable future. Although Ramirez's season hasn't lived up to his previous years, many of his numbers are better than what Mauer produced prior to his injury. He won't offer the same on-base skills as Mauer (Ramirez's .313 OBP is inferior to Mauer's .404), but he would bring more power to the Twins, whose four home runs from the DH spot are tied for the fewest in the American League.

Astros
Houston is fourth in the Majors in runs scored, yet its production from the DH spot has been woeful. The Astros, who have started five players at DH this season, have a collective .651 OPS from the spot, ranking 14th out of 15 AL teams. Evan Gattis has started 33 games as the DH, slashing .224/.286/.388 in 126 plate appearances. Ramirez would offer a better alternative against lefties in particular, as his .854 OPS vs. southpaws is significantly higher than Gattis' .698 mark.

Mets
The Mets gave Jose Bautista another shot, so perhaps they'll offer up a landing spot for Ramirez, who would bring another professional bat to a lineup ranked 27th in the league in runs scored. Ramirez hasn't played in the outfield since 2015, but Bautista hadn't played third base with any regularity since '11 before the Braves brought him in to play there.

Rockies
Ian Desmond is having a brutal year at the plate, slashing .181/.234/.374 in 48 games. Desmond's .608 OPS ranks 150th out of the 164 hitters with enough at-bats to qualify for a batting title, the biggest reason Colorado's .598 OPS at first base ranks 29th out of 30 big league teams this season. Ramirez would give the Rockies another option at the position, while a move to Coors Field -- where his career 1.040 OPS in 32 games is his highest in any ballpark -- could re-energize him.

Blue Jays
Kendrys Morales has struggled to get it going this season, leaving Toronto 12th out of 15 AL teams with a .666 OPS out of the DH spot. There have been countless calls for Vladimir Guerrero Jr. to get the call as Morales' replacement, but if the Jays are resolved to keeping their top prospect in the Minors, Ramirez would give them a more productive option at the DH spot than Morales. One potential catch: Morales is owed $12 million next season.

Orioles
Chris Davis is owed nearly $85 million between 2019-22, so it's unlikely that the Orioles would replace him altogether, but the first baseman is off to a horrendous start, slashing .152/.240/.250 with four home runs. Davis' OPS is even worse than Desmond's, with his .490 mark topping only two of the 164 qualified hitters this season. If nothing else, Ramirez would give manager Buck Showalter a much better option against lefties, against whom Davis is hitting .125 this season.

Mark Feinsand is an executive reporter for MLB.com.

Hanley Ramirez

Wily Hendricks stifles SF as Cubs break out late

Zobrist, Bryant deliver 2-run knocks in 7th to bust open pitchers' duel
MLB.com @CarrieMuskat

CHICAGO -- Kyle Hendricks didn't throw any pitches over 90 mph on Friday. None of his 88 pitches even registered at 90. Yet the right-hander dominated the Giants over seven innings and Ben Zobrist delivered a tie-breaking two-run double in the seventh to lift the Cubs to a 6-2 victory at Wrigley Field.

Hendricks retired the first nine batters he faced before Gorkys Hernandez collected the first hit and run off the right-hander by leading off the Giants' fourth inning with his fifth home run. The hit had a higher exit velocity (93 mph) than any of Hendricks' pitches, according to Statcast™. Hernandez also singled with two outs in the sixth for the only other hit off Hendricks.

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CHICAGO -- Kyle Hendricks didn't throw any pitches over 90 mph on Friday. None of his 88 pitches even registered at 90. Yet the right-hander dominated the Giants over seven innings and Ben Zobrist delivered a tie-breaking two-run double in the seventh to lift the Cubs to a 6-2 victory at Wrigley Field.

Hendricks retired the first nine batters he faced before Gorkys Hernandez collected the first hit and run off the right-hander by leading off the Giants' fourth inning with his fifth home run. The hit had a higher exit velocity (93 mph) than any of Hendricks' pitches, according to Statcast™. Hernandez also singled with two outs in the sixth for the only other hit off Hendricks.

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How much did Hendricks mix it up? During a six-pitch at-bat against Brandon Belt in the seventh, the right-hander started with a 70-mph curve, included an 88-mph sinker and finished with a 79.8-mph changeup that the Giants' first baseman launched to the warning track in right.

Video: SF@CHC: Zobrist makes his second leaping grab of game

The Cubs took a 1-0 lead in the first on Anthony Rizzo's RBI single off Giants starter Derek Holland, who otherwise avoided trouble until the seventh, when he hit Javier Baez with a pitch and then walked Ian Happ. Holland was lifted for Will Smith, and both runners advanced on Addison Russell's perfectly placed sacrifice.

Smith then walked pinch-hitter Tommy La Stella on four pitches, and Zobrist lined the first pitch he saw from Smith to left to put the Cubs in front, 3-1. Cory Gearrin took over, and Kris Bryant greeted him with a two-run single.

Video: SF@CHC: Zobrist rips a go-ahead two-run double in 7th

MOMENT THAT MATTERED
Zobrist and Albert Almora Jr. singled to open the Chicago first, and both advanced on a passed ball by Buster Posey. One out later, Zobrist scored on Anthony Rizzo's single, but Almora was easily thrown out by left fielder Mac Williamson, who fired a 94.6-mph strike home.

Video: SF@CHC: Rizzo lines a single to left, plates one

SOUND SMART
Hendricks gave up two hits over seven innings, giving him eight straight starts of three or fewer earned runs allowed.

Video: SF@CHC: Hendricks works out of trouble with grounder

UP NEXT
Jose Quintana will start Saturday night. He's coming off a stellar outing against the Reds in which he gave up one hit over seven scoreless innings. This will be his third career start vs. the Giants. He's 0-2 with a 4.97 ERA so far, with both games at AT&T Park. Fastball command was the key in his last outing. First pitch was scheduled for 6:15 p.m. CT from Wrigley Field.

Carrie Muskat has covered the Cubs since 1987, and for MLB.com since 2001. You can follow her on Twitter @CarrieMuskat.

Chicago Cubs, Kyle Hendricks

Mock Draft: College players in demand

MLB.com @JimCallisMLB

This first-round projection looks an awful lot like my previous one from two weeks ago, with only the fourth and fifth picks flipping among the first nine. And it closely resembles Jonathan Mayo's predictions from last week, with our first seven selections matching.

This first-round projection looks an awful lot like my previous one from two weeks ago, with only the fourth and fifth picks flipping among the first nine. And it closely resembles Jonathan Mayo's predictions from last week, with our first seven selections matching.

:: 2018 Draft coverage ::

That's not to say the top of the Draft is locking into place. While Auburn right-hander Casey Mize remains the front-runner to go No. 1 overall, the Tigers still are considering four alternatives. It continues to look like college players will monopolize the first six picks, and clubs are busy scurrying from conference tournament to conference tournament this week to evaluate them, and others who will fit later in the first round.

Further complicating matters is the high school pitching. It's plentiful, with at least 11 legitimate first-round candidates, but it's also a demographic that scares a lot of clubs because of the risk involved. All 11 won't go in the first round, several will go lower than where their talent alone will dictate and three of them (Mason Denaburg, Ethan Hankins, Mike Vasil) missed time this spring with physical ailments.

Ten days away from the start of the Draft, here's our best guess as to how the first round plays out:

1. Tigers: Casey Mize, RHP, Auburn

Mize's last two regular-season starts were his worst of the year, but his combination of stuff and precision is still unparalleled in this Draft. Georgia Tech catcher Joey Bart appears to be Plan B, and Detroit also is keeping tabs on Wichita State third baseman Alec Bohm, Wisconsin high school outfielder Jarred Kelenic and Florida right-hander Brady Singer.

2. Giants: Joey Bart, C, Georgia Tech

Mize and Bart, easily the best catcher available, likely will go 1-2 or 2-1. If San Francisco decides to take a deep discount to save extra money for later picks, it could cut a deal with California high school right-hander Cole Winn.

Video: Draft Report: Joey Bart, College catcher

3. Phillies: Alec Bohm, 3B, Wichita State

All of the teams in the top four are doing their due diligence on Bohm, the consensus best college position player in terms of hitting for both average and power. Philadelphia almost certainly will take a college performer, with Oregon State second baseman Nick Madrigal and Singer the other leading candidates.

4. White Sox: Brady Singer, RHP, Florida

If the top three picks unfold as expected, Chicago will choose between Kelenic, Madrigal, Singer and South Alabama outfielder Travis Swaggerty. MLB Pipeline's No. 1-rated prospect entering the year, Singer would be the best fit for the White Sox current needs, not that need will drive a choice this high.

5. Reds: Nick Madrigal, 2B, Oregon State

Cincinnati would pounce on Bart or Singer. If that's not an option, the choice will come down to Madigral, Arizona prep left-hander Matthew Liberatore and Jonathan India. Madrigal is the best hitter in the Draft, just like Nick Senzel was when the Reds made him the No. 2 overall pick in 2016.

Video: Draft Report: Nick Madrigal, College 2B/SS

6. Mets: Jonathan India, 3B, Florida

Unless one of the five selections above unexpectedly drops, New York will consider India, Kelenic, Liberatore and Swaggerty. The Mets are leaning college and that probably means India, who had a breakout season as the Southeastern Conference player of the year.

7. Padres: Matthew Liberatore, LHP, Mountain Ridge HS (Glendale, Ariz.)

The run on collegians figures to stop here, though San Diego does like Swaggerty. The Padres are expected to choose from the top tier of high school arms: Liberatore, right-hander Carter Stewart (Florida), left-hander Ryan Weathers (Tennessee) and Winn. Liberatore is the consensus top prep pitching prospect, but all four guys are in play.

8. Braves: Nolan Gorman, 3B, O'Connor HS (Phoenix)

Atlanta is associated with mostly high schoolers. The Braves appear to prefer Gorman -- the best power hitter in the Draft, but also a bit of a polarizing prospect who might slide into the mid-teens if he doesn't go here -- to Kelenic. The prep pitchers also will be in play, starting with Weathers.

Video: Draft Report: Nolan Gorman, High School 3B

9. Athletics: Travis Swaggerty, OF, South Alabama

Oakland looks destined to take a position player, though Liberatore could change that. Swaggerty has some of the best all-around tools in the college ranks and gets the nod over Kelenic and Gorman.

10. Pirates: Grayson Rodriguez, RHP, Central Heights HS (Nacogdoches, Texas)

Rodriguez has more helium than any first-rounder right now, which could vault him all the way into the top 10 to a club focusing on high school arms. Stewart, Weathers and Winn also are in Pittsburgh's mix.

11. Orioles: Cole Winn, RHP, Orange (Calif.) Lutheran HS

Baltimore is targeting the same prep pitchers as Pittsburgh. If the Orioles go for a college arm, this could be the high-water mark for Stetson right-hander Logan Gilbert.

12. Blue Jays: Jarred Kelenic, OF, Waukesha (Wis.) West HS

Every Draft has a guy who seems to be considered by several teams, but doesn't quite make it to their top choice, and this year that may be Kelenic. The best high school hitter available, he may not be able to overcome the preference for collegians at the top or for prep arms right ahead of Toronto. If he's gone, the Blue Jays are on more prep bats such as Gorman, outfielder/wide receiver Jordyn Adams (North Carolina) and others who could drop into the 20s if they don't go 12 or 13: shortstop Xavier Edwards (Florida), third baseman Jordan Groshans (Texas) and catcher Noah Naylor (Canada).

Video: Draft Report: Jarred Kelenic, High School outfielder

13. Marlins: Triston Casas, 1B, American Heritage School (Plantation, Fla.)

Miami is pursuing a lot of the same high school bats as Toronto, as well as two more in Casas, who has power to rival Gorman's, and outfielder Connor Scott (Florida).

14. Mariners: Ryan Rolison, LHP, Mississippi

After sliding out of the top 10 and possibly into the 20s, Rolison reversed course with a strong outing Wednesday at the SEC tournament. The best bet is that Seattle takes him or one of the other college arms on the second tier behind Mize and Singer: Gilbert, Florida right-hander Jackson Kowar and South Florida left-hander Shane McClanahan. The Mariners likely would take one of the college hitters projected above here and possibly Oregon State outfielder Trevor Larnach.

15. Rangers: Carter Stewart, RHP, Eau Gallie HS (Melbourne, Fla.)

With a fastball that reaches 98 mph and a super-spin curveball, Stewart shouldn't last 15 picks, but high school right-handers often last longer than they should. If he's gone, Winn or Weathers also would be attractive.

Video: Draft Report: Carter Stewart, High School pitcher

16. Rays: Connor Scott, OF, Plant HS (Tampa)

Tampa Bay is another club in the market for high school bats. The Rays have three first-round choices and the second-largest bonus pool at $12,415,600, so they're in great position to make a run at Adams, who is signed to play football at North Carolina, where his father Deke is a defensive line coach. Or they could take another speedy outfielder in Scott and save their cash for later picks.

17. Angels: Ryan Weathers, LHP, Loretto (Tenn.) HS

College arms such as Gilbert, Kowar and McClanahan would be tempting, but Weathers would be hard to pass up. Los Angeles also has shown interest in Adams and Georgia prep right-hander Ethan Hankins, MLB Pipeline's top-rated high school prospect, until he battled a muscular issue in the area of his pitching shoulder.

18. Royals: Jordyn Adams, OF, Green Hope HS (Cary, N.C.)

Kansas City can match Tampa Bay's three first-rounders and has the largest bonus pool at $12,781,900. If the Royals want Adams, they probably have to take him here to ensure they get him. The same is true of Groshans, whom they have covered heavily. One of the top-tier high school arms would be hard to pass up if they got to 18.

19. Cardinals: Logan Gilbert, RHP, Stetson

Unless some of the first tier of prep pitchers lasts longer than expected, the second tier of college arms should start to come off the board around here. St. Louis gets mentioned mostly with pitchers ...

20. Twins: Jackson Kowar, RHP, Florida

... as does Minnesota, which wouldn't be adverse to a high school arm, but figures to be mostly looking at collegians. The Twins also are monitoring a number of high school shortstops such as Edwards, Jeremiah Jackson (Alabama) and Osiris Johnson (California) -- but apparently not the more expensive Brice Turang (California).

21. Brewers: Shane McClanahan, LHP, South Florida

A lefty who can hit 100 mph and mix in a plus changeup, McClanahan looked to be solidly in the 6-12 range until he started scuffling with his control and command over his last six starts. Falling this far might be a bit extreme. Milwaukee isn't wed to any particular demographic and is one of several landing spots for Larnach in the 20s.

Video: Draft Report: Shane McClanahan, College pitcher

22. Rockies: Cole Wilcox, RHP, Heritage HS (Ringgold, Ga.)

Wilcox has the potential for three plus pitches and isn't far behind the top group of high school pitchers. Colorado also has been tied to another Georgia prepster, switch-hitting and switch-throwing catcher Anthony Seigler.

23. Yankees: Brice Turang, SS, Santiago HS (Corona, Calif.)

Turang was mentioned as a candidate to go No. 1 overall entering last summer, and while he hasn't lived up to those expectations, he's still a talented shortstop in a Draft thin at that position. A variety of high school position players get mentioned with New York, including Adams, Casas, Edwards and outfielder Mike Siani (Pennsylvania).

24. Cubs: Trevor Larnach, OF, Oregon State

Chicago has had a lot of success taking the best college bat available in the first round, which would make Larnach a fit. The Cubs would love for one of the prime college or high school arms to get to No. 24. They're also the peak for players such as Indiana high school outfielder Nick Schnell or Stanford shortstop Nico Hoerner, though this would be a bit high for both.

25. D-backs: Steele Walker, OF, Oklahoma

A year after taking an accomplished college bat in Pavin Smith at No. 7, Arizona could go the same route with Walker. Other college position player options include Clemson first baseman Seth Beer, Duke outfielder Griffin Conine, Missouri State shortstop Jeremy Eierman, Larnach and Virginia outfielder Jake McCarthy. It's no secret that the D-backs love prep shortstop Matt McLain, but No. 25 is rich for him.

Video: Draft Report: Steele Walker, College outfielder

26. Red Sox: Jordan Groshans, 3B, Magnolia (Texas) HS

Unless someone with a higher ceiling slides, Boston could grab one of the better all-around high school bats in Groshans. The Red Sox probably would consider several of the college position players mentioned with the D-backs above.

27. Nationals: Mason Denaburg, RHP, Merritt Island (Fla.) HS

Washington has had a lot of success buying low on pitchers with physical questions such as Lucas Giolito (first round, 2012), Erick Fedde (first round, 2014) and Jesus Luzardo (third round, 2016). That makes it an obvious target for Denaburg (biceps tendintis), Hankins and Massachusetts high school right-hander Mike Vasil (elbow soreness). Back on the mound Tuesday, Denaburg struck out Casas twice and showed the same upper-first-round form he displayed before getting sidelined.

28. Astros: Alek Thomas, OF, Mount Carmel HS (Chicago)

A run of high school outfielders should start around here. Adams and Scott won't last much longer if they haven't been taken, while Parker Meadows (Georgia), Schnell, Siani and Thomas may not get to pick No. 40. Naylor and Seigler are two non-outfield possibilities.

Video: Draft Report: Alek Thomas, HS outfielder

29. Indians: Noah Naylor, C, St. Joan of Arc Catholic SS (Mississauga, Ont.)

Cleveland has two selections toward the end of the first round and could double up on prep bats unless one of the premium high school arms makes his way to No. 29. Besides Naylor, the Indians also are watching the outfield group mentioned with the Astros, plus Edwards and Georgia high school catchers Will Banfield and Seigler.

30. Dodgers: Jameson Hannah, OF, Dallas Baptist

An outfielder is a good guess for Los Angeles, whether it be sweet-swinging collegians Hannah or Walker or one of the high schoolers.

31. Rays: Ethan Hankins, RHP, Forsyth Central HS (Cumming, Ga.)

Hankins does have a clean MRI and could go much higher than this, though only Kansas City can match Tampa Bay's ability to pay him. If the Rays take a pitcher at 18 and Adams is still on the board, he'd be an obvious choice.

Video: Draft Report: Ethan Hankins, High School pitcher

32. Rays: Seth Beer, 1B, Clemson

Scouts either love Beer's track record of production or hate his all-bat profile and lack of success with wood bats. He'll go in the first round somewhere and there's buzz that he could land in the top 20, but he's a total wild card.

33. Royals: Anthony Seigler, C, Cartersville (Ga.) HS

Groshans would be the guy if he gets this far, which probably won't happen. Seigler has the up-the-middle athleticism Kansas City covets. The Royals also could take a shortstop such as Oregon State's Cadyn Grenier or Jackson.

34. Royals: Mike Vasil, RHP, Boston College HS (Boston)

Kansas City figures to take at least one pitcher with its three first-rounders. Vasil looked healthy while touching 95 mph on Tuesday. The Royals also could grab high school right-handers J.T. Ginn (Mississippi) or Kumar Rocker (Georgia), who have first-round arms and will command those type of bonuses even if they slide into the second round.

35. Indians: Xavier Edwards, SS, North Broward Prep (Coconut Creek, Fla.)

The high demand for shortstops and the relatively short supply makes it increasingly unlikely that Edwards and his all-around skills make it out of the first round.

Jim Callis is a reporter for MLB.com. Follow @jimcallisMLB on Twitter. Listen to him on the weekly Pipeline Podcast.

Theo spikes rumors: 'Essentially zero trade talks'

Baez on taking grounders with Lindor: 'If I have a chance to do it again, I'll do it'
MLB.com

CHICAGO -- Cubs president of baseball operations Theo Epstein dismissed rumors that have linked the team to Orioles shortstop Manny Machado, saying "there are zero trade talks going on now."

"I'm not addressing any specific rumor or any player on another team ... but the simple way to put it is there's been a lot of trade rumors involving the Cubs and there are essentially zero trade talks right now involving the Cubs," Epstein said Friday. "There's a real disparity between the noise and reality. Sometimes that puts a player or two that we have in a real tough circumstance. It's my job to clarify there's nothing going on now."

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CHICAGO -- Cubs president of baseball operations Theo Epstein dismissed rumors that have linked the team to Orioles shortstop Manny Machado, saying "there are zero trade talks going on now."

"I'm not addressing any specific rumor or any player on another team ... but the simple way to put it is there's been a lot of trade rumors involving the Cubs and there are essentially zero trade talks right now involving the Cubs," Epstein said Friday. "There's a real disparity between the noise and reality. Sometimes that puts a player or two that we have in a real tough circumstance. It's my job to clarify there's nothing going on now."

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Epstein pointed out that the early part of the schedule is the time when teams find out about themselves and he's not looking to add someone like Machado, who will be a free agent after this season.

"We have more than enough ability to win the division, to win the World Series," Epstein said. "We really need to focus on our roster and get the most out of our ability and find consistency.

"If you rush to those kind of judgments, you can often times make things worse," he said. "I think it's important to figure out exactly who you are and give guys a chance to play and find their level and see how all the pieces fit together before you make any adjustments."

Worth noting
• Both manager Joe Maddon and Epstein said that while the Cubs are hitting for power, not enough of that power is coming with runners in scoring position.

"We're not getting the bang for our buck," Epstein said. "A lot of our extra-base hits and home runs are with nobody on base. We're not performing at the same level with guys in scoring position. It should all even out."

Video: CWS@CHC: Rizzo clubs a three-run homer in the 1st

As of Friday morning, the Cubs had recorded 71 extra-base hits in May, with 79 percent of those coming with nobody in scoring position. Just 15 of those extra-base hits have come in their 239 plate appearances with RISP. The Cubs have come to bat 822 times this month.

Maddon said a lot of times pitchers alter their approach to hitters when there are runners in scoring position, throwing more offspeed pitches and breaking balls, which can make it harder to record extra-base hits. Other times, he said hitters try too hard to score multiple runs on one swing and, as a result, they swing at pitches they can't drive.

"Everybody wants to score three or four or two," Maddon said. "Just score one."

• Before Wednesday's Interleague game between Chicago and Cleveland, Javier Baez took advantage of being reunited with his Team Puerto Rico teammate, Francisco Lindor, to take grounders with the Indians' shortstop. Baez said he got some feedback about doing so from those who feel opposing players shouldn't mingle.

"It's so difficult to explain this -- it can go 50-50, the right way or wrong way," Baez said Friday. "It's 2018; we're not in the '80s, '90s. We don't hate the other team like it used to be. The game has changed so much."

Video: CHC@CLE: Baez wags finger at Lindor from first base

He said he learned a lot talking to Lindor.

"To me, it doesn't matter what they say out there," Baez said. "If I have a chance to do it again, I'll do it. It should be fun and it's a game -- it should be a fun. If we get a chance, we'll do it again and hopefully people understand."

Anthony Rizzo, a cancer survivor, spent Thursday's off-day visiting patients and speaking to families at OSF Health Care in Peoria, Ill. The organization serves patients and families in central and northern Illinois and upper Michigan.

"It's the biggest hospital outside of [Lurie Children's Hospital in Chicago] that deals with pediatric cancer," Rizzo said. "It was special. There was a good showing of all the kids."

Tweet from @Cubs: .@ARizzo44 visited with patients in Peoria, Ill. today! #EverybodyIn pic.twitter.com/Glphm5mSTQ

Matt Martell is a reporter for MLB.com based in Chicago. Carrie Muskat has covered the Cubs since 1987, and for MLB.com since 2001. You can follow her on Twitter @CarrieMuskat.

Chicago Cubs, Javier Baez, Anthony Rizzo

These are the 10 most exciting players in MLB

MLB.com @RichardJustice

Mike Trout does everything well. He's that rare player who does not need to collect a hit to help his team win. Even better, Trout gets it. He understands that running down a ball in center field or throwing out a runner can impact a game as much as hitting the ball over the fence.

Also important is his attitude. He plays with a joy and energy that is captivating. To watch him play is to be reminded again and again of the greatness of this sport.

Mike Trout does everything well. He's that rare player who does not need to collect a hit to help his team win. Even better, Trout gets it. He understands that running down a ball in center field or throwing out a runner can impact a game as much as hitting the ball over the fence.

Also important is his attitude. He plays with a joy and energy that is captivating. To watch him play is to be reminded again and again of the greatness of this sport.

Get MLB.TV for just $69.99

When I set out to come up with baseball's 10 most exciting players, I used Trout as one of the gold standards. These are the players you subscribe to MLB.TV to watch.

What matters? Power certain does. Speed matters, too. That is, players who do things that bring you out of your seat and make you think, "Did he really just do that?"

Defense and baserunning matter, too.

In the end, something like this comes back to the pure pleasure of watching someone play. For pitchers, that means emotion and stuff and a raging competitive fire.

When the Braves were putting together a game-winning six-run rally in the bottom of the ninth inning Sunday, it was impossible not to look at their dugout and see all those happy players hanging onto the railing and cheering for one another.

Video: Must C Comeback: Braves score 6 in the 9th to win it

If there was a "Most Exciting Moment" for a young season, the Braves' rally would be high on the list.

After the World Series last fall, that's the sort of question I got most about the Astros: "Are they really like that? Are they that happy?"

Yes, they really were that happy. That was true in 2017, and it's also true this year.

So with all those intangibles in mind, here's one man's list of baseball's 10 most exciting players. No team is represented more than once, which took some deserving players out of the running. We'll offer a hat tip to them after the Top 10 list.

Your cards and letters -- via Twitter, e-mail, Facebook, comments below, etc., -- are welcome. Here goes:

Video: LAA@TEX: Trout knocks 441-ft. HR, thrills young fan

1. Mike Trout, Angels, CF
Many of us did not see Ted Williams or Willie Mays play. But we saw Mike Trout, and someday baseball fans who missed out will wonder if he was really that good. Yes, he was.

Video: Must C Classic: Betts slugs 3 homers to lead comeback

2. Mookie Betts, Red Sox, RF
If the season ended today, Trout would not be the American League MVP Award winner. Betts would be honored for a season in which he's putting power, speed and plate discipline on display. Did we mention his Gold Glove Award-worthy defense?

Video: NYM@ATL: Albies homers on Thor's 99.6-mph heater

3. Ozzie Albies, Braves, 2B
Word began getting around four years ago, when Albies hit .364 in Rookie League ball. He was 17 at the time, and Braves officials would say things like, "Wait until you see Albies." He's all that and then some, especially after adding power to a game that had been built primarily around speed. The 21-year-old quickly has become the happy, energetic face of the Atlanta turnaround.

Video: Must C Catch: Herrera leaps to take HR from Freeman

4. Odubel Herrera, Phillies, CF
Now that the Phillies are winning again, it's easier to appreciate all this 26-year-old All-Star brings to the table. His defense remains a work in progress, but his passion, smile and production have become the symbols of the return of competitive baseball in Philadelphia.

Video: NYY@TEX: Judge crushes homer 471 feet vs. the Rangers

5. Aaron Judge, Yankees, RF
How could a larger-than-life figure on a larger-than-life franchise not make a list like this one? Judge's size and power, combined with his humility and demeanor, make him as compelling as any player on the planet.

Video: Scherzer is fastest ever to 100 strikeouts in season

6. Max Scherzer, Nationals, RHP
His every start is an event as he piles up strikeouts, flirts with no-hitters and thoroughly entertains with all those emotions bubbling to the surface. Scherzer has 71 games of at least 10 strikeouts, five of at least 15. In four seasons with the Nationals, he has taken a no-hitter into the sixth inning 11 times (and finished two of them).

Video: Must C Classic: Hader K's 8 in 2 2/3 IP for 4th save

7. Josh Hader, Brewers, LHP
Take a look at this guy. Hader is a slightly built 6-foot-3 with a whip-like delivery and hair streaming from beneath his cap. Hader's game is simple: power. His fastball averages 94 mph, and he's terrific working the corners, then finishing off hitters with sliders. In his first full Major League season, Hader has emerged as one of baseball's most unhittable relievers, having struck out more than half the hitters he has faced.

Video: Must C Combo: Machado hits 2 HRs, flashes leather

8. Manny Machado, Orioles, SS
During Machado's six seasons at third base, Orioles fans found themselves doing something they never thought possible: they dared compare someone to Brooks Robinson. That's how electric Machado was as he almost routinely stabbed balls down the line and threw out runners while he was falling toward foul territory. Machado is back at shortstop -- where he played in the Minors -- and he is having his best offensive season.

Video: Must C Combo: Lindor's 2-HR, 2-double game

9. Francisco Lindor, Indians, SS
He joined the Indians a few days after the Astros summoned Carlos Correa to the Major Leagues, and the two of them probably will be compared to one another forever. Lindor's smile is his trademark -- and it is reflective of his attitude about pretty much everything -- but the rest of his game is pretty good, too.

Video: Must C Classic: Springer's historic six-hit effort

10. George Springer, Astros, CF
He symbolizes everything the Astros have accomplished these past four seasons. Springer does that by playing 100 mph all the time, from defense in the outfield to running the bases to hitting cannonball shots out of the park. Perhaps the greatest tribute to his contribution was Astros manager AJ Hinch asking Springer to stay with the club even when he was on the disabled list. Hinch thought Springer's presence would not be a small thing.

ALSO DESERVING OF MENTION: Tommy Pham, Cardinals, CF; Jorge Alfaro, Phillies, C; Shohei Ohtani, Angels, RHP/DH; Andrelton Simmons, Angels, SS; Justin Verlander, Astros, RHP; Bryce Harper, Nationals, RF; Ronald Acuna, Jr., Braves, LF; Giancarlo Stanton, Yankees, DH.

Richard Justice has been a reporter for MLB.com since 2011. Read his columns, listen to his podcast and follow him on Twitter at @RichardJustice.

Williamson off DL, promptly nails runner at home

MLB.com @sfgiantsbeat

CHICAGO -- The Giants hope that Mac Williamson can perform as if those 27 games he missed were a mere nuisance.

The Giants activated Williamson from the disabled list Friday and immediately installed him in left field for the series opener against the Cubs. Williamson hadn't played for the Giants since April 24, when he sustained a concussion in a collision with the left-field wall.

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CHICAGO -- The Giants hope that Mac Williamson can perform as if those 27 games he missed were a mere nuisance.

The Giants activated Williamson from the disabled list Friday and immediately installed him in left field for the series opener against the Cubs. Williamson hadn't played for the Giants since April 24, when he sustained a concussion in a collision with the left-field wall.

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This wasn't a mere one-day, knock-the-rust-off start for Williamson. Giants manager Bruce Bochy said that Williamson, who hit a robust .316 (6-for-19) with three homers and six RBIs in five games before being sidelined, will receive "the lion's share" of playing time in left.

Williamson hurt himself when he stumbled and collided with the left-field wall adjacent to the Giants' bullpen at AT&T Park in pursuit of a foul ball.

"I'm excited to be back," Williamson said. "My body feels good. It's encouraging."

Video: WSH@SF: Williamson belts a solo home run to center

Williamson contributed immediately by throwing out Albert Almora Jr. at home plate in the first inning. Statcast™ stracked Williamson's throw at 94.6 mph.

The Giants optioned left-hander Josh Osich to Triple-A Sacramento to clear roster room for Williamson. This trimmed San Francisco's pitching staff to 12 -- one fewer than usual, which is not an ideal situation with a three-game series at Coors Field looming ahead beginning Monday. Expect the Giants to add a reliever by that date.

Chris Haft has covered the Giants since 2005, and for MLB.com since 2007. Follow him on Twitter at @sfgiantsbeat and listen to his podcast.

San Francisco Giants, Mac Williamson

Yanks expect to activate Bird off DL Saturday

MLB.com @BryanHoch

NEW YORK -- With the Yankees poised to reinstate Greg Bird from the 10-day disabled list prior to Saturday's game against the Angels, manager Aaron Boone said that the organization has not locked in their corresponding move, but he is bracing for a difficult conversation no matter whom it happens to involve.

Returning from right ankle surgery performed in late March, the 25-year-old Bird completed his Minor League rehabilitation assignment with Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre on Thursday. He played four games at Triple-A, five at Double-A Trenton and three for Class A Advanced Tampa, batting a combined .205/.367/.436 with three homers and eight RBIs.

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NEW YORK -- With the Yankees poised to reinstate Greg Bird from the 10-day disabled list prior to Saturday's game against the Angels, manager Aaron Boone said that the organization has not locked in their corresponding move, but he is bracing for a difficult conversation no matter whom it happens to involve.

Returning from right ankle surgery performed in late March, the 25-year-old Bird completed his Minor League rehabilitation assignment with Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre on Thursday. He played four games at Triple-A, five at Double-A Trenton and three for Class A Advanced Tampa, batting a combined .205/.367/.436 with three homers and eight RBIs.

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"It's something that we've had a lot of conversations about," Boone said. "We are still mulling it over; we just met a little bit ago to work through things and what we think the best way to go is. It leads to a difficult decision, not a simple one, not an obvious one. It's something, frankly, that we're still kind of working through."

In Bird's absence, Tyler Austin and Neil Walker have shared duties at first base, and Boone again lauded Austin's contributions prior to Friday's game. The 26-year-old has eight homers, tied with Gleyber Torres for most among American League rookies, and is tied for third with 14 extra-base hits.

"With Tyler, he's been an impact performer for us," Boone said. "He's a reason why we're sitting here where we are with a strong record. He's one of those guys that's played a major role in that. We expect that to continue throughout this year."

Video: NYY@KC: Austin belts 2 homers for 4 RBIs vs. Royals

With Walker and infielders Miguel Andujar and Ronald Torreyes also viewed as valuable parts of the roster, it is possible that the Yankees could trim a reliever from their 13-man pitching staff to accommodate Bird's return.

Should they opt to go that route, right-hander A.J. Cole represents one such candidate. Cole has pitched 6 2/3 scoreless innings over four appearances since being acquired from the Nationals on April 23. Boone said that an upcoming stretch of 14 games in 13 days has been discussed as a factor.

"We try and be as transparent as we can, and explain situations or our decisions to guys as best we can," Boone said. "A lot of times, those are difficult conversations that are the reality and the nature of this business. When you are a part of a really good team with a deep roster, those decisions can be even tougher and those conversations can be even harder."

Back in the bullpen
Right-hander Tommy Kahnle was reinstated from the disabled list prior to Friday's game, rejoining the Yankees after throwing three innings over two Minor League rehab appearances with Class-A Charleston and Scranton/Wilkes-Barre.

Kahnle last appeared for the Yanks on April 12, when he was diagnosed with right shoulder tendinitis following a dip in velocity. Boone said that he expects to again see Kahnle in the mid-to-high 90s with his fastball, based on the two appearances in the Minors.

"He's another dynamic arm," Boone said. "It's another good option. So when you want to have a guy down for a day or try to stay away from someone, the deeper we are down there with really strong options, the better our bullpen is going to be. We feel like Tommy, when he's right, is one of those real impact options for us."

Boone indicated that he would be hesitant to pitch Kahnle on back-to-back days, at least in the early going.

"My first inclination is no," Boone said. "It kind of depends on what the workload is. If he has a clean outing, 1-2-3, not a lot of pitches and then seems like he's bounced back pretty well the next day I wouldn't think that would be an issue."

Play Ball
The Yankees will celebrate the youth-focused Play Ball Weekend on Sunday, participating in a league-wide initiative to engage youth and celebrate baseball and softball participation in communities throughout the U.S. and Canada.

A new component of this year's Play Ball Weekend effort is that Major League players, coaches and managers will wear batting practice T-shirts inspired by the classic baseball movie "The Sandlot." Clubs also will have special ballpark giveaways including bat and ball sets, sunglasses, eye black, pitch-grip baseballs, wristbands, drawstring bags, caps and more.

This date in Yankees history
May 25, 2011: Mariano Rivera made his 1,000th career appearance in a 7-3 victory over the Blue Jays, becoming the first pitcher in Major League history to reach that plateau all with one team.

Bryan Hoch has covered the Yankees for MLB.com since 2007. Follow him on Twitter @bryanhoch and on Facebook.

New York Yankees, Greg Bird

Red Sox part ways with Hanley

Veteran infielder designated for assignment to make room for Pedroia
MLB.com @IanMBrowne

BOSTON -- In a stunning move, the Red Sox designated slumping slugger Hanley Ramirez for assignment on Friday to clear a spot on the roster for second baseman Dustin Pedroia, who was activated from the disabled list.

All the speculation leading up to Friday was that Blake Swihart, who is out of Minor League options and has been used sparingly by manager Alex Cora this season, would be the one to get DFA'd.

BOSTON -- In a stunning move, the Red Sox designated slumping slugger Hanley Ramirez for assignment on Friday to clear a spot on the roster for second baseman Dustin Pedroia, who was activated from the disabled list.

All the speculation leading up to Friday was that Blake Swihart, who is out of Minor League options and has been used sparingly by manager Alex Cora this season, would be the one to get DFA'd.

Instead, the Red Sox parted ways with Ramirez, who was hitless in his last 21 at-bats.

"He did an outstanding job early in the season, but sometimes you've got to make tough decisions on a daily basis," Cora said. "Sometimes it was tough not to play Mitch [Moreland] and sometimes it was tough not to play Hanley, just like everybody else." 

The move will allow Cora to play first baseman Mitch Moreland on a near everyday basis. Swihart, who has started just four games this season, all at DH, should also see more time with the revamped roster.

"I don't think he didn't fit in but I think his role was going to diminish and for how good of a player he is, it was going to be difficult," Cora said. "It was probably platoon, maybe come in and pinch-hit late in games, and that's not the perfect role for Hanley Ramirez. He's a guy that needs his at-bats. Obviously, with the versatility we have with the other players, with Brock [Holt], with [Eduardo] Nunez, and with Blake, as far as managing the game, it's a lot easier with those guys."

Ramirez thanked Red Sox fans in a tweet shortly after the move was made official. "Thank you #RedSoxNation. It's been real. Love you always," wrote Ramirez.

Tweet from @HanleyRamirez: Thank you #RedSoxNation. It���s been real. Love you always🙏

The 34-year-old hit .254/.313/.395 with six home runs and 29 RBIs in 44 games for the Red Sox this year. Ramirez had a solid start to the season, hitting .311 with three homers and 17 RBIs in his first 103 at-bats.

"It was a baseball-related move for us," president of baseball operations Dave Dombrowski said. "We've been looking at making a move because we knew that this day with Dustin would come, where he'd be coming back, probably since February, since Spring Training. We talked about different possibilities when somebody would be ready, when they won't be ready. We talked about all type of possibilities. So for us it really was a baseball move, one that I talked to Alex about yesterday. We were prepared to maybe go in a different direction with our move. He called me, was about 11:30 in the morning, I was getting ready to go for a run. And Alex says, 'I've got a thought for you with what we're doing. And he said that this was a move that I would like to make. I recommend making it.'

"It comes down to my final decision, but [Cora] said, 'I really want to play Mitch Moreland more. He's a good player, he's played very well for us. I don't think that Hanley is a person that sits idling on the bench well. It gives us an opportunity to keep Blake Swihart. Also we'll be in a position to give Blake some more playing time.' So he said this is something I'd recommend us doing. And I said, 'You sure?' And he said, 'Yeah.' And he went through some different reasons behind it from his thought process. And what I asked him to do at that point was to make sure that he went to the ballpark, because he gets there earlier than me, meet with his coaching staff, and be in a position where that's what he really wanted to do. And when I got to the ballpark yesterday, Frank [Wren, senior VP/player personnel] and I drove over and I said, 'This is what we would like to do. So we're proceeding in that direction."

Once Boston's top prospect, Ramirez was traded to the Marlins for Josh Beckett and Mike Lowell in November on Nov. 24, 2005. That trade worked for both sides, as Beckett and Lowell helped the Red Sox win a World Series in '07, and Ramirez emerged into a star for the Marlins, winning the National League Rookie of the Year Award in '06.

A key wrinkle to this move is a vesting option in Ramirez's contract. The Red Sox reacquired Ramirez as a free agent, signing him to a four-year, $88 million contract that includes a $22 million vesting option for 2019 if he reaches 497 plate appearances this year. Ramirez already has 195 plate appearances and was well on his way to reaching the threshold that would cause the option to vest, but by letting him go now, the Red Sox will assure that does not happen with them.

When a player is designated for assignment -- often abbreviated "DFA" -- that player is immediately removed from his club's 40-man roster, and 25-man roster if he was on that as well. Within seven days of the transaction (it was previously 10 days), the player must either be traded, released or placed on irrevocable outright waivers.

Unless he's claimed, the Red Sox will pay about $15 million that remains on Ramirez's contract, which runs through the end of this season. It should not be assumed that the Red Sox are just going to eat the money and let Ramirez sign elsewhere. In fact, there is some recent precedent for a team DFAing an impending free agent and working out a reasonable trade. The Mets designated Matt Harvey for assignment on May 5 and then swung a deal with the Reds for catcher Devin Mesoraco a few days later. Both players are eligible for free agency this offseason and have been performing well with their new clubs.

In his four seasons with Boston since 2014, Hanley hit .260/.326/.450 with 78 home runs, 255 RBIs and 71 doubles.

Ramirez was at his best in 2016, helping the Red Sox win the American League East title by belting 30 homers to go with 111 RBIs and an .866 OPS. Hampered by discomfort in both shoulders last season, Ramirez was inconsistent but came up big in Boston's Division Series loss to the Astros, going 8-for-14 with two doubles.

The charismatic Ramirez came into this season optimistic he would have a rebound season, and spoke with enthusiasm of how following Tom Brady's "TB12" exercise regimen and diet would help him. Ramirez also noted last winter that he was going to be "Miami Hanley" again.

"I was a little surprised," Pedroia said. "I've played with Hanley since we were real young. It's tough. I haven't spoke with him yet, but obviously everyone knows my relationship with him. I care about him and his family and everything. I wish him the best. I hope he'll play somewhere and do great things."

A three-time All-Star for the Marlins, Ramirez finished second in NL Most Valuable Player voting in 2009, hitting .342 to win the league's batting title. In that season, Ramirez had 106 RBIs and 24 home runs with 42 doubles in 151 games at shortstop. He won Silver Slugger Awards in '08 and '09 and was the NL Player of the Month in June '08.

Afterward, he had some good moments for the Dodgers, producing an .874 OPS over parts of three seasons.

As recently as Thursday, Ramirez was still batting third for the Red Sox. But he hit just .163 with three home runs, 12 RBIs, four walks, two doubles and 14 strikeouts in 19 games in May.

It remains to be seen if the Red Sox will miss Ramirez in their "rivalry" games against the Yankees. This season, Ramirez belted three homers in 22 plate appearances against the Bronx Bombers, slashing .389./.455/.889.

"It was a bit of a stunner, obviously," Yankees manager Aaron Boone said. "The first [thought] was, 'I'm glad we don't have to see him.' He has some big hits against us already this year, and obviously he's still a guy that probably has a lot of baseball left in him. I'm sure there will be a number of teams inquiring about him.

"When you take a step back and look at it, I think you can understand the move to some degree for them and their roster. But still, when you see that come across, I think it's a bit of a stunner for a guy who's still a good player and has had the career that he's had."

The label of "big-game player" would be a fair way to characterize Ramirez, who is a .380 lifetime hitter in 80 postseason at-bats.

Ian Browne has covered the Red Sox for MLB.com since 2002. Follow him on Twitter @IanMBrowne and Facebook.

Boston Red Sox, Hanley Ramirez

These 10 prospects will make an impact soon

MLB.com @JonathanMayo

Another week, another slew of exciting Major League debuts.

It's hard not to get jaded and expect every prospect to homer in his first game, like Willy Adames did, or even on the first pitch of their first start (we see you, Juan Soto!). Guys raking right out of the gate (Exhibit A: Austin Meadows and his .440/.440/.880 line with three homers) seems almost par for the course.

Another week, another slew of exciting Major League debuts.

It's hard not to get jaded and expect every prospect to homer in his first game, like Willy Adames did, or even on the first pitch of their first start (we see you, Juan Soto!). Guys raking right out of the gate (Exhibit A: Austin Meadows and his .440/.440/.880 line with three homers) seems almost par for the course.

While it can't possibly continue at this rate, we don't want any fantasy owner to be caught napping. Adames and Soto were both on last week's Fantasy Top 10, so we've updated the list with some new names, guys who aren't necessarily widely known prospects, but who could produce if and when they get their first callup to the big leagues.

Video: SD@WSH: Soto's first homer goes 422 feet to left

1. Vladimir Guerrero Jr., 3B, Blue Jays (Previous rank: 1)
It seemed like Guerrero would be the first teenager to get called up from Double-A, but Soto beat him to the punch. No one questions if he could handle big league pitching now, as Guerrero is up to .427/.479/.707 with nine homers and 46 RBIs in the Eastern League; perhaps the only concern is his ability to play third in Toronto, and what to do with Josh Donaldson. Toronto should find a place for his bat sooner rather than later.

2. Alex Reyes, RHP, Cardinals (Previous rank: 6)
It's pretty safe to say that Reyes is ready to return from his Tommy John surgery rehab, right? In two starts over the last week, one in Double-A and one in Triple-A, the hard-throwing right-hander struck out 26 and allowed just two hits in 14 2/3 IP.

Video: Reyes speaks after his final rehab start

3. Ryan McMahon, 1B, Rockies (Previous rank: 2)
While McMahon's first stint in the bigs didn't go so well, it's not like Ian Desmond has warmed up at all (.181/.234/.374) at first base in Colorado. Meanwhile, McMahon is finding his groove, hitting .333 with three homers and 10 RBIs in his last 10 games.

4. Eloy Jimenez, OF, White Sox (Previous rank: 5)
I used to shy away from putting young hitters in Double-A on this list. No more. Jimenez now has a .323/.367/.586 line thanks to his .372 May. He would be an upgrade over anyone manning an outfield corner in Chicago currently.

5. Nick Senzel, 3B, Reds (Previous rank: 3)
A bout with vertigo has knocked Senzel down this list some, but he is resuming baseball activities. As he gets back into full swing, look for him to move back up. The Reds should give his tools a shot as soon as he has his feet back under him.

Video: Sheldon, Graves discuss Nick Senzel's health status

6. Michael Kopech, RHP, White Sox (Previous rank: 4)
In the last week, Kopech has shown exactly why fantasy owners should be excited about a callup (17 K's and just six hits allowed in 12 IP over two starts) and why the White Sox might be hesitant (6 walks).

7. Willie Calhoun, OF, Rangers (Previous rank: 7)
We knew it was only a matter of time until Calhoun started hitting. The power hasn't even shown up yet in full force, but it's encouraging to see him hitting .322 this month. His defensive limitations make it a bit tougher to find time for him in Texas, but he can force his way into that lineup with continued success at the plate.

8. Austin Riley, 3B, Braves (Previous rank: 9)
The youth movement is Atlanta is working, and some would say ahead of schedule. Riley's up in Triple-A and mashing (.321/.383/.584 overall; .303/.365/.470 in 17 games with Gwinnett). How long before the Braves decide to add this 21-year old to the mix?

Video: Braves prospect Riley on working with Washington

9. Christin Stewart, OF, Tigers (Previous rank: Unranked)
Stewart has always shown power (58 homers in past two years) and patience (career .364 OBP) in the Minors. This year, he's cut down his strikeout rate while not sacrificing any power, as he leads the International League with 11 home runs. Meanwhile, the Tigers' primary left fielder, JaCoby Jones, has a .675 OPS.

10. Kolby Allard, LHP, Braves (Previous rank: Unranked)
The Braves have already brought up a top hitting prospect (Ronald Acuna Jr.) and a pitcher (Mike Soroka), and we have Riley on the list this week. So let's balance it with another top arm. Allard won't help your strikeout totals, but he is in the International League's Top 10 in both ERA and WHIP.

Dropped out: Willy Adames, SS, Rays (Previous rank: 8); Juan Soto OF, Nationals (Previous rank: 10)

Jonathan Mayo is a reporter for MLB Pipeline. Follow him on Twitter @JonathanMayo and Facebook, and listen to him on the weekly Pipeline Podcast.

Podcast: When is time right for Vlad Jr.?

MLB.com

Jim Callis, Jonathan Mayo and Tim McMaster weigh in on the homer-filled big league debuts of Nationals' No. 2 prospect Juan Soto, Rays' No. 2 prospect Willy Adames and Pirates' No. 2 prospect Austin Meadows. The guys also discuss when the right time is for No. 2 overall prospect Vladimir Guerrero Jr. to make his debut. With just 10 days to go before the MLB Draft, they talk about the best tools in this year's MLB Pipeline Top 200 Draft Prospects list.

Jim Callis, Jonathan Mayo and Tim McMaster weigh in on the homer-filled big league debuts of Nationals' No. 2 prospect Juan Soto, Rays' No. 2 prospect Willy Adames and Pirates' No. 2 prospect Austin Meadows. The guys also discuss when the right time is for No. 2 overall prospect Vladimir Guerrero Jr. to make his debut. With just 10 days to go before the MLB Draft, they talk about the best tools in this year's MLB Pipeline Top 200 Draft Prospects list.

On the MLB Pipeline Podcast, Callis, Mayo and McMaster are your tour guides through all the unfolding stories and breaking news of baseball's top prospects. Each week, you'll find out about the stars of tomorrow from the guys who know today. Look out for new episodes on Thursdays. Download, subscribe and help others find the show by leaving a rating and review on iTunes or your favorite platform.

These are the top 200 Draft prospects

MLB.com @JonathanMayo