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Pedro was at center of magical '99 ASG

@IanMBrowne
April 16, 2020

BOSTON -- The electricity that was in the air at Fenway Park the night of the 1999 All-Star Game could be felt by everyone who was there or watching on television. One of the most magical events in baseball history was streamed live recently on MLB's Facebook, Twitter and YouTube

BOSTON -- The electricity that was in the air at Fenway Park the night of the 1999 All-Star Game could be felt by everyone who was there or watching on television.

One of the most magical events in baseball history was streamed live recently on MLB's Facebook, Twitter and YouTube platforms, as well as redsox.com.

What made it such a special night, aside from the historic venue that was hosting the All-Star Game for the first time since 1961?

It started with the unveiling of the All-Century Team’s Top 100 players in history.

From Ted Williams to Stan Musial to Willie Mays to Hank Aaron to Sandy Koufax to Brooks Robinson and countless others, the most revered players ever lined up on the diamond together in a pregame ceremony for the ages.

If that wasn’t enough, Williams -- in what would be his final public appearance at Fenway Park -- threw out the ceremonial first pitch to Carlton Fisk as the fans at Fenway went crazy.

But the most spontaneous moment of the night came just after that, when all of the current All-Stars swarmed Williams near the pitcher's mound.

Cal Ripken, Tony Gwynn, Mark McGwire and many others players went up to Williams to either express admiration or simply to talk baseball.

Then, the game started, and hometown hero Pedro Martinez put on one of the most sparkling performances in All-Star history, striking out five of the six batters he faced.

Martinez, at the height of his powers that summer, was throwing 99-mph fastballs and knee-buckling changeups and curveballs to the best hitters in the game.

The American League went on to a 4-1 win, with Martinez taking home the MVP trophy.

Ian Browne has covered the Red Sox for MLB.com since 2002. Follow him on Twitter @IanMBrowne and Facebook.