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Davidson excited about opportunity with A’s

@MartinJGallegos
June 17, 2019

OAKLAND -- Logan Davidson has an idea about what it’s like to play in the big leagues. After all, his father, Mark, played six seasons with the Astros and Twins. But when he stepped into the A’s clubhouse at the Coliseum for the first time in his life on Monday

OAKLAND -- Logan Davidson has an idea about what it’s like to play in the big leagues. After all, his father, Mark, played six seasons with the Astros and Twins. But when he stepped into the A’s clubhouse at the Coliseum for the first time in his life on Monday afternoon, the feeling was unlike anything he could ever imagine.

“It’s been surreal, honestly. Different than what I expected,” Davidson said. “I got that pen in my hand and almost forgot how to write my name. There’s a different feel to it.”

You can’t blame Davidson for the temporary amnesia. The shortstop out of Clemson University, who the A’s selected with the 29th overall pick in the 2019 MLB Draft, was in town to sign a life-changing document as the two sides came to an agreement on a deal that includes a $2,424,600 million signing bonus, per MLB.com’s Jim Callis -- right at the slot value for the pick.

After the handshakes with A’s general manager David Forst, scouting director Eric Kubota and the rest of the organization’s scouting team concluded, Davidson was situated with his own locker in the clubhouse, where a green A’s jersey and white pants hung on the top railing. To make him feel a little more comfortable, he was given the locker right next to Oakland utility man Chad Pinder, whose brother, Chase, was Davidson’s teammate at Clemson.

Pinder is one of the many A’s players who have been fast-tracked shortly after being drafted -- he was a second-round pick in 2013, and he made his MLB debut three years later. Oakland is not afraid to accelerate a prospect’s ascent through the system if it feels he’s ready, which is music to Davidson’s ears.

“That’s what it’s all about, opportunities,” Davidson said. “To have an organization that you know does that is a really good feeling. I put my head down and get to work. Just to know I’m going to get those opportunities is enlightening.”

Davidson’s career at Clemson sets the groundwork for a potential quick rise. He entered this month as MLB Pipeline’s No. 22 Draft prospect with reputation for his raw power, speed and arm strength from the shortstop position. Davidson hit .291 with 18 doubles and 15 homers across 61 games (all starts) during his junior season with Clemson, and finished his collegiate career with a .290 average.

“We started scouting Logan in high school. We’ve seen him a lot over the years,” Kubota said. “A switch-hitter with power. We just like the way he plays the game, hard and with a passion.”

Accompanied by several members of his family, including his father and agent Scott Boras, whose clientele includes A’s third baseman Matt Chapman and pitcher Sean Manaea, Davidson took the field with the rest of the A’s players before Monday’s game against the Orioles. Davidson took grounders on the left side of the infield and participated in batting practice.

The 21-year-old switch-hitter showed off his swing from both sides of the plate. Davidson's left-handed swing is one he and his father modeled after former Twins star catcher Joe Mauer, shortly after they began to develop his swing by hitting wiffle balls in the driveway of their Charlotte, N.C., home at the age of three. Mauer certainly is not a bad player to mold your game after, but Kubota had a different player in mind when coming up with a comp for the shortstop’s overall game.

“I’m on record as saying he reminds me a bit of Corey Seager,” Kubota said. “It’s the same offensive profile at shortstop who can impact the game with the bat and glove. That’s who I thought of.”

Davidson will head to Burlington, Vt., on Tuesday, where he will begin his Minor League career with the Class A Short Season Vermont Lake Monsters, and hope to move his way up as quickly as Pinder and Chapman once did.

“He’ll begin the season in the New York-Penn League,” Forst said. “How quickly he moves from there is up to him.”

The A’s have now signed or agreed to terms with 34 of their 40 picks, including each the first 11, and 21 of their top 24, after also agreeing to a deal with second-round pick Tyler Baum, a right-handed pitcher out of North Carolina, on Monday.

Martin Gallegos covers the A's for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter @MartinJGallegos.