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Hinch wants to see Giles control emotions

Astros closer punched himself in face, threw bat after outing Tuesday
MLB.com @brianmctaggart

HOUSTON -- Astros manager AJ Hinch was on the mound after making a pitching change in the ninth inning Tuesday when reliever Ken Giles punched himself in the face as he approached the dugout and then slammed a bat to the ground. Giles, who struck out the side in the ninth to save Monday's win, was rocked for four runs in the ninth inning of Tuesday's 4-0 loss to the Yankees.

Because he was on the mound, Hinch didn't see Giles' antics and couldn't address them following Tuesday's game. Prior to Wednesday's game, however, Hinch said he would like to see Giles control his emotions better.

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HOUSTON -- Astros manager AJ Hinch was on the mound after making a pitching change in the ninth inning Tuesday when reliever Ken Giles punched himself in the face as he approached the dugout and then slammed a bat to the ground. Giles, who struck out the side in the ninth to save Monday's win, was rocked for four runs in the ninth inning of Tuesday's 4-0 loss to the Yankees.

Because he was on the mound, Hinch didn't see Giles' antics and couldn't address them following Tuesday's game. Prior to Wednesday's game, however, Hinch said he would like to see Giles control his emotions better.

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"It's a tough look for someone coming out of competition like that," Hinch said. "I understand the frustration, I understand how much these guys put into it, but in an ideal world, you handle it a little more calmly without the violence."

Hinch told reporters he might have a conversation with Giles while wandering the outfield during batting practice, but he hadn't discussed the incident with Giles by the time he met with reporters three hours prior to Wednesday's game. Hinch has a psychology degree from Stanford and is known for handling players well.

Video: NYY@HOU: Verlander, Giles on 4-0 loss to Yankees

"Obviously, it's in my background and whether it's a specialty of mine is to be determined by each individual guy whether it works or not, but part of my job as a manager is to push the buttons of the players and get the most out of them," Hinch said. "Some of that is good old-fashioned encouragement, some of that is tough love, some of it is the balance of the two, but it's part of my job."

Hinch said there's a balance between letting players be themselves and letting them tear themselves down.

"That doesn't necessarily have to be physical," he said. "We saw the video last night. That's one aspect of it. You can emotionally tear yourself down, too. Everybody responds to success and failure differently. You don't want it to be counterproductive. You want it to be channeled in the right area and used in the right way, and ultimately maximize their potential and performance by being constructive, not destructive."

When asked postgame Tuesday about the outburst and performance, Giles oozed frustration.

"Of course I'm going to be frustrated with [my outing]," he said. "This team deserves the best out of everybody, and they need me to be the best I can be. They deserve that, and that's what I'm going to give them from here on out."

Brian McTaggart has covered the Astros since 2004, and for MLB.com since 2009. Follow @brianmctaggart on Twitter and listen to his podcast.

Houston Astros, Ken Giles