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Looking at MLB's 14 combined no-hitters

August 3, 2019

There have been 302 no-hitters throughout Major League Baseball’s history, and nearly all of them have been performed by a single pitcher. The others? Fourteen combined efforts where the starter didn’t go the distance and the bullpen completed the feat. Below is a look at each combined no-hitter, beginning with

There have been 302 no-hitters throughout Major League Baseball’s history, and nearly all of them have been performed by a single pitcher. The others? Fourteen combined efforts where the starter didn’t go the distance and the bullpen completed the feat.

Below is a look at each combined no-hitter, beginning with the most recent.

Astros 9, Mariners 0 -- Aug. 3, 2019
Aaron Sanchez (6 IP), Will Harris (1), Joe Biagini (1), Chris Devenski (1)
What a debut. Sanchez was making his first Astros start, after Houston acquired him from the Blue Jays at the Trade Deadline just three days earlier. He became the first pitcher in franchise history to throw six or more no-hit innings in his first game as an Astro. And Sanchez wasn't even the only new guy to take the mound -- Biagini, who pitched the eighth, came over from Toronto in the same trade. The Astros' no-no made the 2019 season just the second ever with multiple combined no-hitters, along with 1991.

Angels 13, Mariners 0 -- July 12, 2019
Taylor Cole (2 IP), Felix Pena (7)
In an incredibly emotional game, the first at home after the tragic passing of Tyler Skaggs, the Angels jumped out to a big lead behind Mike Trout's homer, two doubles and six RBIs. But as the evening went on, it became clear that another special development was unfolding: a combined no-hitter.

Taylor Cole was the opener against Seattle, and tossed two perfect innings with a pair of strikeouts. He gave way to Felix Peña, who came in and was dominant for the remaining seven frames, walking one and striking out six. He finished off the combined no-no by getting Mallex Smith to ground out to second.

Following the final out, an emotional Angels squad gathered together and each player took the jersey off his back -- each with the name "Skaggs" and the No. 45 -- and placed it on the mound, along with a painting of Skaggs in front of the famed cornfields from "Field of Dreams."

Dodgers 4, Padres 0 -- May 4, 2018
Walker Buehler (6 IP), Tony Cingrani (1), Yimi Garcia (1), Adam Liberatore (1)
Buehler was electric in his third Major League start, hurling six no-hit innings with three walks and eight strikeouts. But with his pitch count up to 93 and the Dodgers playing it safe with their top prospect, who underwent Tommy John surgery in 2015, Dodgers manager Dave Roberts turned the game over to his bullpen for the final three frames. Cingrani, Garcia and Liberatore finished the job, completing the only combined no-hitter in Dodgers history and the club’s 23rd overall. And this one happened in Mexico.

Phillies 7, Braves 0 -- Sept. 1, 2014
Cole Hamels (6), Jake Diekman (1), Ken Giles (1), Jonathan Papelbon (1)
Hamels was dominant for six frames, holding the Braves without a hit and striking out seven batters. But five free passes brought his pitch count to 108, prompting the call to the bullpen. Philadelphia’s relief trio of Diekman, Giles and Papelbon combined for three perfect innings to finish off the no-no at Turner Field. Hamels would complete a no-hitter of his own the following season against the Cubs on July 25.

Mariners 1, Dodgers 0 -- June 8, 2012
Kevin Millwood (6), Charlie Furbush (2/3), Stephen Pryor (1/3), Lucas Luetge (1/3), Brandon League (2/3), Tom Wilhelmsen (1)
Seattle tied the 2003 Astros’ record for most pitchers used in a no-hitter when Millwood and five relievers combined to complete the feat against the Dodgers. A mild groin strain knocked Millwood out of this one after six innings. He walked one batter and struck out six before exiting after 68 pitches. It’s one of six Interleague no-hitters and the first Mariners no-hitter at Safeco Field.

Astros 8, Yankees 0 -- June 11, 2003
Roy Oswalt (1), Peter Munro (2 2/3), Kirk Saarloos (1 1/3), Brad Lidge (2), Octavio Dotel (1), Billy Wagner (1)
The Astros set the MLB record for most pitchers used in a no-hitter, which was later tied by the Mariners in 2012. Oswalt’s early exit due to an injury left Houston’s bullpen to complete this no-hit effort. Lidge was named the winning pitcher after two perfect innings.

Pirates 3, Astros 0 -- July 12, 1997
Francisco Cordova (9 IP), Ricardo Rincon (1 IP)
Cordova was brilliant in blanking Houston for nine innings at Three Rivers Stadium, compiling 10 strikeouts to two walks over 121 pitches. He remains the only pitcher in MLB history to open a combined no-hitter by pitching nine full innings. The Bucs got a walk-off, three-run homer from Mark Smith in the bottom of the 10th to end it, after Rincon worked around a one-out walk to retire the side in the top half of the frame.

Braves 1, Padres 0 -- Sept. 11, 1991
Kent Mercker (6 IP), Mark Wohlers (2 IP), Alejandro Pena (1 IP)
Mercker, who is the last Braves pitcher to throw a no-hitter (April 8, 1994 at Dodgers), started and held the Padres hitless through six innings on 82 pitches at Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium, walking two and striking out six. Wohlers and Pena took it from there, closing things out for the second Braves no-hitter since the club moved to Atlanta in 1966.

Orioles 2, A’s 0 -- July 13, 1991
Bob Milacki (6 IP), Mike Flanagan (1 IP), Mark Williamson (1 IP), Gregg Olson (1 IP)
Milacki was cruising until a line drive off Willie Wilson’s bat hit him in the hand and then the leg, though the ball fortuitously bounced over toward first base to keep history intact. That ended his day, but Flanagan, Williamson and Olson towed the line to record the second four-pitcher no-no.

"I think it was kind of strange for them," said then-A’s manager Tony La Russa. "Everybody congratulated different people. Nobody knew who to shake hands with. But it all counts."

Angels 1, Mariners 0 -- April 11, 1990
Mark Langston (7 IP), Mike Witt (2 IP)
What a debut this was for Langston. Fresh off signing a five-year, $16 million contract with the Angels, Langston tormented his former team with seven no-hit frames in his team debut before handing off to Witt, who was making his first relief appearance in seven years. Witt was responsible for the Angels’ previous no-hitter -- his perfect game against the Rangers on Sept. 30, 1984.

White Sox 2, A’s 1 -- July 28, 1976
Blue Moon Odom (5 IP), Francisco Barrios (4 IP)
It was a wild night in Oakland, with Odom walking eight batters through five innings, then getting pulled for Barrios after issuing his ninth free pass to begin the sixth. Barrios walked two more, as the White Sox set a record with 11 in a no-hitter. Only 3,367 fans were on hand to see this history made.

A’s 5, Angels 0 -- Sept. 28, 1975
Vida Blue (5 IP), Glenn Abbott (1 IP), Paul Lindblad (1 IP), Rollie Fingers (2 IP)
While the A’s ultimately fell short in seeking their fourth straight World Series title in 1975, they still capped off their fifth straight division-title season in style. It was the last game of the season, and Oakland let its ace Blue pitch just five innings before handing it off to its bullpen, which didn’t allow a baserunner the rest of the way. This marked Blue’s second no-hitter after he twirled one by himself on Sept. 21, 1970.

Orioles 1, Tigers 2 -- April 30, 1967
Steve Barber (8.2 IP), Stu Miller (0.1 IP)
Baltimore didn’t allow a hit, but it also didn’t get the win. Barber issued back-to-back walks to begin the ninth, and the runners advanced on a sacrifice bunt. Barber then tossed a wild pitch that allowed Detroit to tie the game at 1, and then followed with his 10th walk of the day.

Miller came in to spell Barber and got Don Wert to line out to shortstop Luis Aparicio, but the normally sure-handed Mark Belanger dropped Aparicio’s relay throw for a potential double-play forceout, allowing the Tigers to score the go-ahead run. Al Kaline grounded out to end the inning, but the Orioles went down in order in the bottom of the ninth to seal a rare no-hitter loss.

Red Sox 4, Senators 0 -- June 23, 1917
Babe Ruth (0 IP), Ernie Shore (9 IP)
It’s probably the most famous opening to any no-hitter. Ruth, in his fourth season as an ace pitcher for Boston, got himself ejected for arguing balls and strikes after walking leadoff man Ray Morgan. Morgan was caught stealing after Shore’s very first pitch, and the righty retired the next 26 batters he faced for a most improbable no-hitter.