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Arb wire: Figures filed for unsigned players

Deadline passes for clubs to exchange terms with arbitration-eligibles
MLB.com @mattkellyMLB

Major League Baseball's arbitration deadline fell at 1 p.m. ET on Friday. Teams and their arbitration-eligible players needed to exchange proposed salaries for the 2018 season in preparation for a potential hearing, in which a panel of arbitrators decides between the two figures.

Many arbitration-eligible players settle on a contract with their clubs prior to the deadline and avoid the arbitration process -- but many don't, in which case both sides file their figures.

Major League Baseball's arbitration deadline fell at 1 p.m. ET on Friday. Teams and their arbitration-eligible players needed to exchange proposed salaries for the 2018 season in preparation for a potential hearing, in which a panel of arbitrators decides between the two figures.

Many arbitration-eligible players settle on a contract with their clubs prior to the deadline and avoid the arbitration process -- but many don't, in which case both sides file their figures.

Generally, players gain arbitration eligibility after logging three years of Major League service time. They then go through the process until signing a long-term deal or reaching free agency after six years of service. A select group of Super Two players, who meet certain criteria, gain eligibility after two-plus years of service and then have arbitration rights for four years instead of the usual three.

For some teams, the deadline represented a cutoff time to settle on a salary figure for 2018, while others are willing to continue negotiating right up until the scheduled hearing (to be scheduled between Jan. 29 and Feb. 16). The teams with a hard deadline employ what's known as "file-and-trial" or "file-and-go," choosing to go to a hearing once the two sides exchange numbers. Sources have told MLB.com's Mark Feinsand that roughly two-thirds of teams follow this strategy, while the other 10 or so teams are willing to negotiate beyond Friday's deadline.

As the 2018 arbitration figures exchanged by players and their teams come in, MLB.com is tracking them right here. Some of these figures are based on sources or reports and have not been confirmed by the clubs. Click through on the "More" links for details.

SUPER TWOS
The Super Two designation applies to players who rank in the top 22 percent, in terms of service time, among all those who have amassed between two and three years in the Majors.

Braves
Hard-throwing righty Mike Foltynewicz filed for a $2.3 million salary, per MLB Network insider Jon Heyman, while the Braves countered at $2.2 million. The club has not confirmed. More >

Pirates
Closer Felipe Rivero followed up his breakout '17 season by filing for a $2.9 million salary, while the Pirates countered with a $2.4 million offer, per Heyman. The club has not confirmed. More >

FIRST YEAR

Astros
Following a triumphant 2017 season in which he won the World Series MVP award on a one-year, $3.9 million contract, outfielder George Springer has filed for a $10.5 million salary for 2018. The Astros countered with an $8.5 million salary, per Heyman.

Meanwhile, closer Ken Giles filed for a $4.6 million salary following a dominant 2017 campaign in which he saved 34 games and recorded a 2.30 ERA. The reigning champions countered with a $4.2 million offer, per Heyman. The club has not confirmed either report. More >

Athletics
Sinkerballer Kendall Graveman filed for a $2.6 million salary, while the A's filed at $2.36 million, according to Heyman. The club has not confirmed. More >

Blue Jays
Marcus Stroman eclipsed 200 innings for the second straight season and lowered his ERA to a career-best 3.09. After being arbitration-eligible for the first time last year as a Super Two player, Stroman is filing for $6.9 million. The Blue Jays countered with a $6.5 million salary, per USA Today. The club has not confirmed. More >

Indians
Coming off a career season in which he went 17-9 with a 4.19 ERA, right-hander Trevor Bauer -- who was a Super Two player last year -- filed for a $6.525 million salary for the '18 season. The Indians countered at $5.3 million, per Heyman. The club has not confirmed. More >

Marlins
Miami's dynamic catcher J.T. Realmuto -- a subject of trade rumors amid the team's rebuilding effort this offseason -- filed for a $3.5 million salary for 2018, per Heyman. The Marlins countered with a $2.9 million offer.

Meanwhile, first baseman Justin Bour -- a participant in last July's Home Run Derby -- filed for a $3.4 million salary for 2018, per Heyman. The Marlins countered at $3 million.

The club has not confirmed either report. More >

Orioles
Right-hander Kevin Gausman, who was arbitration-eligible as a Super Two player last year, filed for a $6.225 million salary for 2018, per Heyman. Baltimore countered at $5.3 million.The club has not confirmed.

Red Sox
The reigning American League East champs filed for a $7.5 million salary for Mookie Betts for 2018, while Boston's star right fielder filed for $10.5 million, according to Heyman. The club has not confirmed. More >

Reds
Shortstop Eugenio Suarez put up career-best totals of 26 home runs and an .828 OPS in 2017, MLB.com's Mark Sheldon reports. Suarez has filed for a $4.2 million salary in '18. The Reds countered at $3.75 million. More >

SECOND YEAR

Astros
Right-handed starter Collin McHugh filed at $5 million after holding a 3.55 ERA over 63 1/3 innings last season. According to Heyman, the Astros countered at $4.55 million. The club has also not confirmed. More >

Cubs
Right-handed reliever Justin Grimm filed for $2.475 million for 2018, per Heyman, while the Cubs countered at $2.2 million. The club has not confirmed. More >

D-backs
Shelby Miller missed most of the 2017 season after undergoing Tommy John surgery and could not come to an agreement with his team on a deal. According to Heyman, Miller filed for $4.9 million, while the D-backs filed at $4.7 million. The club has not confirmed. More >

Mets
Seeking to re-establish himself after a tough 2017 campaign, righty Zack Wheeler filed for a $1.9 million salary according to the New York Post. The Mets countered at $1.5 million. The club has not confirmed.

Orioles
USA Today reports that second baseman Jonathan Schoop -- a first-time All-Star last season -- filed for a $9 million salary while the Orioles countered at $7.5 million. The club has not confirmed.

Reds
Second baseman Scooter Gennett was a new man at the plate in 2017, busting out for a career-high 27 home runs and .874 OPS. Gennett requested a $5.7 million salary for '18, per Heyman, while Cincinnati countered at $5.1 million. The club has not confirmed. More >

Royals
MLB.com's Jeffrey Flanagan reports that right-handed reliever Brandon Maurer, acquired from the Padres last July, filed for a $3.5 million salary. Kansas City countered at $2.95 million. More >

Twins
Right-hander Kyle Gibson has filed for a $4.55 million salary in 2018, and the Twins filed at $4.2 million, per Heyman. The 30-year-old's best season for Minnesota came in 2015, when he posted a 3.84 ERA in a career-high 32 starts. He's posted an identical 5.07 ERA in each of the past two seasons. More >

White Sox
Avisail Garcia is coming off a stellar season in which he finished runner-up to Jose Altuve in the AL batting race with a .330 average. Heyman reports that the right fielder filed for a $6.7 million salary next year, while Chicago countered at $5.85 million. The club has not confirmed. More >

THIRD YEAR
Rays
Shortstop Adeiny Hechavarria, whom the Rays acquired from Miami last June, filed for $5.9 million for his final run through arbitration, per Heyman. Tampa Bay countered at $5.35 million. The club has not confirmed. More >

Matt Kelly is a reporter for MLB.com based in New York. Follow him on Twitter at @mattkellyMLB.