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Inbox: How will Toronto commemorate Doc?

Beat reporter Gregor Chisholm answers questions from fans
November 16, 2017

What will the Blue Jays do to celebrate Roy Halladay, and when will his number be retired? -- Tim D., Winnipeg, ManitobaThe Blue Jays are currently discussing how to properly honor Halladay's memory and their plans will be made public when the timing is appropriate. The first thing Toronto is

What will the Blue Jays do to celebrate Roy Halladay, and when will his number be retired?
-- Tim D., Winnipeg, Manitoba

The Blue Jays are currently discussing how to properly honor Halladay's memory and their plans will be made public when the timing is appropriate. The first thing Toronto is expected to do is make sure no player wears No. 32 again. After that, everything should be left up to the family. It's only a matter of time before Halladay's number is officially retired and his name added to the club's Level of Excellence, but it is his family's right to decide when they are ready for such an honor.
• Blue Jays remember Halladay's heart, class
Brandy and her two sons, Braden and Ryan, showed incredible strength during Tuesday's celebration of Halladay's life. The family is dealing with an unspeakable tragedy, but eventually the time will come to honor Halladay at Rogers Centre in front of the fans who watched him for more than 12 years. After all Halladay's family did for the Blue Jays community, both on and off the field, it's the least the Blue Jays can do.

What is your favorite Roy Halladay memory? I attended his last game at Rogers Centre. We all knew that was it, and he was kind enough to strike out enough batters to win us all a slice of pizza.
-- Mike, Lake Centre, Nova Scotia

There are so many Halladay memories that it seems impossible to pick just one, but the game I always think about is Sept. 27, 1998. Halladay was one out away from a no-hitter during the second start of his big league career when Detroit's Bobby Higginson hit a pinch-hit solo homer to left. Halladay struggled over the next two years before reinventing himself in 2001, but this game provided a glimpse of what was to come.
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In a lot of ways, the near no-no symbolizes Halladay's tenure in Toronto. This was a supposedly meaningless September game, something that Halladay unfortunately became accustomed to with the Blue Jays, but you wouldn't have known it based on the way he pitched. Toronto might not have been a contender during his time, but every five days this team was among the best in baseball because of him.
What sticks out when you think about Roy Halladay's time in Toronto? How do you think he will be remembered?
-- Cynthia H., Mississauga, Ontario

Halladay will be remembered as one of the best pitchers of his generation, but Toronto's love affair with the star righty runs far deeper still. Plenty of big-name players have put on a Blue Jays uniform over the years, but few have embraced this city, and this country, the way Halladay did. Halladay was fiercely loyal to his teammates and to the coaches who turned him into a potential future Hall of Famer.

Despite the lack of team success, Halladay signed two contract extensions at below market value to help the Blue Jays plan long term and bring in additional talent. He never complained, instead keeping his head down and going through a legendary workout routine with the singular focus of getting better each day. By 2009, after 12 seasons in Toronto, few people begrudged him the opportunity to play for a contender.
Will Kevin Pillar ever win a Gold Glove? What does he have to do to have a better chance and do you think he's bothered about it?
-- Daniel W., Colchester, UK

Pillar has been a finalist three years in a row, but has yet to come away with a Gold Glove. Pillar should have won the award in 2016, but he lost out to Tampa Bay's Kevin Kiermaier, who was limited to 105 games because of injuries.

This year is a different story because Minnesota's Byron Buxton was a deserving recipient. Buxton finished with more Defensive Runs Saved (24 to 15) and also had a better Ultimate Zone Rating (9.9 to 6.0). The Gold Glove has long been one of Pillar's goals, so he's undoubtedly disappointed by the news. Will he eventually win? Impossible to say, but I think 2016 was his best shot, so it doesn't look promising.
Will the Blue Jays make a real playoff push next year or are we going to see a season of rebuilding? In other words, do we have the resources to trade for a team that may be able to make the postseason, since the current roster is probably not going to do it?
-- Casper Konijn, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

One thing we know about this offseason is that the Blue Jays are not going to rebuild. General manager Ross Atkins is on record saying he wants to add at least one impact bat and one impact arm, and the club should have upwards of $25 million to spend this winter depending on non-tender candidates and arbitration cases.
• Blue Jays aim to add versatility to roster
Atkins left the General Managers Meetings earlier this week without making a move, but it shouldn't take long for this offseason to heat up. A versatile infielder, a corner outfielder and starting pitcher are on Toronto's shopping list, and this is an organization that wants to add, not subtract, at the big league level.

Gregor Chisholm has covered the Blue Jays for MLB.com since 2011. Follow him on Twitter @gregorMLB and Facebook, and listen to his podcast.