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Dillon Gee calls it a career

January 28, 2019

Dillon Gee, who won 51 games during an eight-year Major League career with the Mets, Royals, Twins and Rangers, announced his retirement on Instagram on Monday."Thank you to the game for the places I've been and the friendships I've gained over the past 11 years!!" Gee wrote.

Dillon Gee, who won 51 games during an eight-year Major League career with the Mets, Royals, Twins and Rangers, announced his retirement on Instagram on Monday.
"Thank you to the game for the places I've been and the friendships I've gained over the past 11 years!!" Gee wrote.

A 21st-round Draft pick out of the University of Texas-Arlington in 2007, Gee recovered from several arm injuries in the Minors to make his MLB debut for the Mets a little more than three years later, on Sept. 7, 2010, defeating the Nationals with seven innings of two-hit ball. He went on to post a 40-37 record with a 4.03 ERA in parts of six seasons with New York.
Gee's last start with the Mets came on June 14, 2015, when he allowed eight runs in 3 2/3 innings to the Braves in a game New York would rally to win, 10-8. The next day, Gee was designated for assignment and, two weeks later, replaced in the rotation by Steven Matz, then the Mets' top prospect.
Gee's career stats
Gee finished out the '15 season in the Mets organization, mostly at Triple-A Las Vegas, before becoming a free agent and signing with the Royals that December -- two months after they'd beaten the Mets in the World Series. In 33 games -- 14 starts -- with Kansas City, Gee went 8-9 with a 4.68 ERA and then needed thorasic outlet surgery in October 2016. He split 2017 with the Twins (14 games, 3-2, 3.22 ERA) and Rangers (four games), before signing with Japan's Chunichi Dragons in 2018. His time in Japan lasted all of four games before he underwent surgery for a blood clot in May 2018.
Gee retires with a career record of 51-48 in MLB, with a 4.09 ERA and 619 strikeouts in 853 2/3 innings.

Dan Cichalski is a senior editor for MLB.com.