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Here are 7 future managerial candidates

MLB.com @feinsand

The Reds' dismissal of Bryan Price has created the first managerial opening of 2018, prompting speculation about who will become the next skipper in Cincinnati.

As is the case with nearly every opening, we'll hear plenty of familiar names such as Joe Girardi, Brad Ausmus and John Farrell, all of whom have recently managed in the Majors. Farrell's name figures to surface on the Reds' list of candidates after he was hired as a scout by Cincinnati this offseason. Jim Riggleman was moved from his role as bench coach to serve as the Reds' interim manager.

The Reds' dismissal of Bryan Price has created the first managerial opening of 2018, prompting speculation about who will become the next skipper in Cincinnati.

As is the case with nearly every opening, we'll hear plenty of familiar names such as Joe Girardi, Brad Ausmus and John Farrell, all of whom have recently managed in the Majors. Farrell's name figures to surface on the Reds' list of candidates after he was hired as a scout by Cincinnati this offseason. Jim Riggleman was moved from his role as bench coach to serve as the Reds' interim manager.

But as we saw this past winter, teams are routinely looking for the next big thing, with five of the six new managers -- Aaron Boone, Mickey Callaway, Alex Cora, Gabe Kapler and Dave Martinez -- all landing their first managerial jobs this season.

Here are seven candidates that could find themselves in contention for a managerial job in the coming months.

Sandy Alomar Jr. (Indians' first-base coach)
The former All-Star catcher has put together a solid coaching résumé since retiring in 2007, serving as a catching instructor with the Mets in '08 before joining the Indians as the first-base coach in '09. He's been with Cleveland ever since.

Alomar, who became the bench coach in 2012, served as Cleveland's interim manager for the final six games that season following the dismissal of Manny Acta. He was one of only two candidates for the permanent job after the season but lost out to Terry Francona. Alomar spent '13 as Francona's bench coach before moving back to first-base coach, where he remains today.

In addition to his interview with the Indians, Alomar has been a candidate for openings with the Cubs, Red Sox and Blue Jays, falling short each time.

Video: Alomar Jr. on importance of series in Puerto Rico

Jay Bell (Yankees' Double-A manager)
Bell played 18 years in the Majors for five teams and has coached for four organizations since 2005, giving him a wealth of knowledge about much of the league.

Known as a great teacher of young players, Bell is managing the Yankees' Double-A affiliate in Trenton. He had his first taste of the job last season with the team's Class A Advanced team in Tampa, where he was named the Florida State League's Manager of the Year.

Bell has been a hitting coach with the Pirates and a bench coach with the D-backs and Reds, giving him a big league coaching résumé to go with his Minor League managerial experience.

Carlos Beltran (Retired player)
The nine-time All-Star hung up his spikes after winning his first World Series championship last fall, closing out an accomplished 20-year career that could land him in the Hall of Fame five years from now.

But weeks after riding in the parade through the streets of Houston, Beltran found himself meeting with Brian Cashman and the rest of the Yankees' front office, interviewing for the team's vacant managerial position. He lost out to Boone, and although Beltran would have been a welcome addition to many coaching staffs, he opted to spend 2018 with his family before considering his future.

Whether Beltran opts to pursue potential coaching opportunities as early as next season remains to be seen, but the soon-to-be 41-year-old has made it clear that he envisions a future in that arena.

Video: Carlos Beltran is a fan of advanced metrics

Gary DiSarcina (Mets' bench coach)
DiSarcina is in his first season as the Mets' bench coach, having served in the same capacity for the Red Sox in 2017. DiSarcina also coordinated Boston's entire Spring Training program, just the latest entry on an impressive résumé.

The 50-year-old -- who has been a candidate for openings in Seattle and Philadelphia -- managed four years in the Boston organization at the Class A (2007-09) and Triple-A ('13) levels, winning three division titles in those seasons.

DiSarcina has also been a member of a front office, serving as a special assistant to the general manager with the Angels in 2011. He later held the third-base and first-base coaching jobs on Mike Scioscia's staff from 2014-16.

Joe Espada (Astros' bench coach)
The Astros' bench coach spent three years on Girardi's staff with the Yankees from 2015-17, though he wasn't given an opportunity to interview for New York's managerial job after Girardi was not brought back. Espada also spent a year working in Cashman's front office as a pro scout.

Prior to joining the Yankees, Espada spent eight years with the Marlins' organization, the last four (2010-13) as the team's third-base coach. Having worked with the Yanks and Astros, the 42-year-old is well-versed in analytics, a plus for any potential managerial candidate.

Espada has also managed in the Puerto Rican Winter League and has served as Puerto Rico's third-base coach in both the 2013 and '17 World Baseball Classic.

Kevin Long (Nationals' hitting coach)
Long was a finalist for the Mets' managerial job this winter, finishing as the runner-up to Callaway. Having spent three seasons (2015-17) as the Mets' hitting coach and eight years (2007-14) in the same role with the Yankees, the 51-year-old has been a part of one World Series champion and another pennant-winning club.

Although Long -- now in his first year as the Nationals' hitting coach -- has spent the past 12 seasons as a Major League hitting coach, he managed in the Carolina League and Northwest League in 1998-99, giving him bench experience.

Video: 30 Clubs in 30 Days: Conforto, Long on hitting drills

Chris Woodward (Dodgers' third-base coach)
Woodward was one of six candidates interviewed by the Yankees this offseason, furthering his reputation as a future Major League manager.

The 41-year-old played for five teams during his 12 seasons (1999-2011) in the Majors, starting his coaching career in 2013 as the Mariners' Minor League infield coordinator. Woodward went on to serve as Seattle's infield coach in '14 and first-base coach in '15 before joining Dave Roberts' Dodgers staff as the third-base and infield coach in '16.

While Woodward hasn't managed in the Minors, he did serve as manager of New Zealand's World Baseball Classic qualifier team in 2013.

Mark Feinsand is an executive reporter for MLB.com.