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Inbox: What are Mets' expectations for Tebow?

Beat reporter Anthony DiComo answers questions from fans
MLB.com @AnthonyDiComo

Tuesday is roughly the midway point of Spring Training, and for the Mets, it's a day of rest. The Mets closed their complex to the public as their players hit golf courses, fishing holes, restaurants and shopping malls up and down the Treasure Coast.

The off-day gives us time to reflect on what we've learned over the first three-plus weeks of Spring Training, as well as what's yet to come.

Tuesday is roughly the midway point of Spring Training, and for the Mets, it's a day of rest. The Mets closed their complex to the public as their players hit golf courses, fishing holes, restaurants and shopping malls up and down the Treasure Coast.

The off-day gives us time to reflect on what we've learned over the first three-plus weeks of Spring Training, as well as what's yet to come.

Which, yes, starts with Tim Tebow.

:: Submit a question to the Mets Inbox ::

Should the Mets sign another quarterback?
-- @MeekPhill_ via Twitter

OK, I laughed. But let's take a more serious question.

At which level do the Mets expect Tebow to play? What are their actual expectations for him?
-- @Weisman_Stephen via Twitter

The Mets have virtually no expectations for Tebow, other than the fact that he won't be playing at Citi Field any time soon, or probably ever. Where Tebow ends up at the end of Spring Training depends entirely on him and how he fares in Minor League spring games. If the Mets feel he's not ready for Class A ball, they could hold him back in extended spring camp for further instruction. Or they could throw Tebow right into the fire at one of their full-season Class A affiliates in Port St. Lucie, Fla. or Columbia, S.C. Reports out of the Arizona Fall League last October pegged Columbia -- and its brand-new stadium -- as his most likely destination.

Tebow to make spring debut | It's Tebow time

The rest is up to Tebow. He could improve and start climbing the Minor League ladder. Tebow could burn out in a month and decide he's done with baseball. Regardless of his destination, let's try to sit back and enjoy the show. And if you aren't a Tebow fan, try not to get too worked up about it. He's just one out of hundreds of Mets Minor Leaguers now.

Video: Tebow to face tough test in spring debut vs. Porcello

Are we crazy to be freaking out about Matt Harvey? Didn't pitchers of the past normally use Spring Training to build up velocity/control?
-- @jonhurwitz via Twitter

What fun would Spring Training be if we didn't have something to freak out about? Of course it's too early to fret over Harvey, who topped out at 94 mph in his Grapefruit League debut -- a solid 5 mph slower than in his 2015 return from Tommy John surgery. Of course there's plenty of time -- five more starts, to be exact -- for Harvey to pump his velocity back into the upper 90s.

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The worry stems from the fact that Harvey is coming off a relatively rare surgery for pitchers, with little precedent upon which we can draw. It's difficult to say whether Harvey's lack of velocity is due to his recovery from surgery, his desire to hold back this early in spring or his simple inability to throw that hard anymore.

"I think it's just being out there and feeling comfortable," Harvey said when asked directly about it. "Obviously, I had trouble with getting extension last year, so I think this year is taking things a little slower, and realizing that I want to get into the fifth, sixth inning before I really start ramping it up. It's still obviously the beginning of March, so I realize there's time."

Translation: Give it a few weeks. If Harvey is still throwing 90-94 mph at the end of March, then you can worry.

Video: STL@NYM: Harvey on his outing, working on mechanics

Why are the Mets interested in Brett Lawrie? Are they not content with using Jose Reyes?
-- @Dwizzy013 via Twitter

The simple answer is that, despite reports to the contrary, the Mets are not actually interested in Lawrie. Those in the know say they're plenty happy using Reyes as their starting third baseman, particularly with Wilmer Flores, T.J. Rivera, Ty Kelly and Matt Reynolds all capable of filling in should something go wrong. And that's without even addressing the possibility that David Wright could still provide value in 2017.

Lawrie is intriguing simply because the White Sox surprise release of him means he can be signed on a league-minimum salary, much like Reyes was a year ago. But dig into the numbers and Lawrie quickly becomes less attractive: a .303 on-base percentage the past three seasons plus below-average defensive metrics the past two, not to mention attitude concerns that have caused trouble for him in the past. If the Mets wanted to acquire someone from outside the organization to provide infield depth, they'd re-sign Kelly Johnson. Right now, they're happy with what they have.

Who is a guy who wasn't really on your radar, but who you now think could sneak onto the 25-man roster?
-- @zackdanielssr via Twitter

A couple of names jump out at me. Wright's injury opens the door for Rivera to make the team, which won't come as much of a surprise to most. But some Mets officials think Kelly could also make a run at that spot, despite his recent demotion off the 40-man roster. Kelly would need to outplay Rivera by a good bit this spring, but it's possible.

Video: STL@NYM: Rivera scores two with single down the line

Don't expect any surprises in the Mets' Opening Day lineup, bench or rotation. But in the bullpen, submariner Ben Rowen, former Triple-A Las Vegas closer Paul Sewald and left-hander Adam Wilk are all having strong camps. Any one of them could make the team. Keep an eye also on prospect Corey Taylor, who dominated the Arizona Fall League and hasn't allowed a run yet this spring. As a 24-year-old with no experience above Class A ball, Taylor isn't likely to make the club. But the Mets like his arm, which should be enough for him to stick around big league camp a good bit longer.

If Jeurys Familia is suspended, Addison Reed becomes the closer. Will the eighth inning be by committee? Or one man, such as Fernando Salas?
-- @JakKlein via Twitter

It will be Salas, with an assist from Jerry Blevins if a tough left-hander comes up in the eighth.

How much of a chance does Rafael Montero, the current Darren Reed-style "perpetual prospect," have of making the team?
-- @jothar via Twitter

Virtually no chance, though that does not make him irrelevant. Montero, who has pitched well so far this spring, is going to be in Las Vegas' rotation. If he fares well there, he still has a chance -- despite the injuries, despite the disappointments, despite everything -- to be the first man up when an injury strikes the rotation.

This is effectively the last chance for Montero, who has given the Mets precious little since the days when the club considered him a better prospect than Jacob deGrom. But it is a real opportunity nonetheless.

Anthony DiComo has covered the Mets for MLB.com since 2008. Follow him on Twitter @AnthonyDiComo and Facebook, and listen to his podcast.

New York Mets