Globe iconLogin iconRecap iconSearch iconTickets icon
news

MLB News

The MLB.com Hall of Fame ballot results are ...

January 15, 2019

Six MLB.com writers were among those eligible to cast ballots in the 2019 Hall of Fame vote conducted by the Baseball Writers' Association of America.• Complete Hall of Fame coverageHere's a look at how the six voted, and at the bottom you can see what the totals look like among this

Six MLB.com writers were among those eligible to cast ballots in the 2019 Hall of Fame vote conducted by the Baseball Writers' Association of America.
• Complete Hall of Fame coverage
Here's a look at how the six voted, and at the bottom you can see what the totals look like among this group:
T.R. Sullivan

  1. Barry Bonds
  2. Roger Clemens
  3. Roy Halladay
  4. Edgar Martinez
  5. Fred McGriff
  6. Mike Mussina
  7. Mariano Rivera
  8. Billy Wagner
  9. Larry Walker
  10. Michael Young
    There are many offensive players who could/should be elected based on their career numbers. I strongly believe McGriff is unfairly overlooked because he was one of the last great hitters before the offensive explosion of the late 1990s and early 2000s. Mussina also thrived as a starting pitcher in the American League right in the thick of that era. It should not have taken him this long to be elected. I'm not big on comparables, but Wagner was every bit as good of a reliever as Rivera or Trevor Hoffman.

Mark Feinsand

  1. Barry Bonds
  2. Roger Clemens
  3. Roy Halladay
  4. Edgar Martinez
  5. Mike Mussina
  6. Manny Ramirez
  7. Mariano Rivera
  8. Curt Schilling
  9. Gary Sheffield
  10. Omar Vizquel
    Three of the players I voted for a year ago -- Vladimir Guerrero, Chipper Jones and Jim Thome -- were inducted into the Hall, so the holdovers (Bonds, Clemens, Edgar, Mussina, Manny, Schilling and Sheffield) took up the first seven spots on my ballot.
    That left me with up to three open spots to fill. Rivera was an obvious choice for one of them in his first time on the ballot, as was Halladay, who, despite a modest win total (203), was one of the most dominant pitchers of his generation. Although I delved into their statistics to confirm what I already knew, these two were no-brainers.

The final spot was a little more difficult. After a first examination of the 26 players, I narrowed down my choice to Todd Helton, Andruw Jones, Jeff Kent, Fred McGriff, Andy Pettitte, Scott Rolen, Vizquel, Larry Walker and Vernon Wells. (OK, Wells wasn't really on my list, but he was one of my favorite players I ever covered, so I considered using my last spot for him for about 30 seconds.)
Although I probably would have voted for five or six of these players had the ballot been open-ended and without the 10-man limit, my choice ultimately came down to two: Pettitte and Vizquel.
Pettitte is viewed by many as a borderline candidate, a take I can't argue with. While his candidacy might be seen differently by voters, I think he belongs in the conversation. (Based on my voting history, I'm obviously not holding his HGH admission against him.) Having seen similar players such as Jorge Posada, Kenny Lofton and Johan Santana fall off the ballot in their first years, I considered voting for Pettitte in an effort to help him get the requisite 5 percent for him to be on the ballot again next year.
Ultimately, Vizquel's excellence in the field (he took home 11 Gold Gloves and is in the conversation as the best defensive shortstop ever) won out. He might not have been an offensive force, but Vizquel was far from an automatic out, finishing his career with 2,877 hits. Pettitte had a great career and will likely be in the mix for my vote again next year, but my belief that Vizquel should be in the Hall outweighed my hopes of seeing Pettitte remain on the ballot.
Jeffrey Flanagan

  1. Barry Bonds
  2. Roger Clemens
  3. Roy Halladay
  4. Andruw Jones
  5. Edgar Martinez
  6. Mike Mussina
  7. Manny Ramirez
  8. Mariano Rivera
  9. Curt Schilling
  10. Larry Walker
    It was difficult leaving off McGriff and Rolen, but we only get 10 spots, which is why I've always favored a binary system -- simply yes or no to each candidate. As for the PED issue, my stance hasn't really changed: If what they did (or didn't) do is so egregious, the Hall of Fame should take those players off the ballot. Don't make us be the morality judges.

Richard Justice

  1. Barry Bonds
  2. Roger Clemens
  3. Roy Halladay
  4. Edgar Martinez
  5. Mike Mussina
  6. Mariano Rivera
  7. Scott Rolen
  8. Curt Schilling
  9. Billy Wagner
  10. Larry Walker
    Easy calls on nine of the 10. All belong in the Hall. As for Wagner, he's one of greatest closers ever, and if they're part of the game (same for DHs), the best of them should be in the Hall. I didn't like leaving off Andruw Jones, Todd Helton, Jeff Kent, Omar Vizquel, Andy Pettitte, Manny Ramirez and Gary Sheffield, who at least deserve to be in the conversation longer.
    Jon Paul Morosi
  11. Barry Bonds
  12. Roger Clemens
  13. Roy Halladay
  14. Edgar Martinez
  15. Fred McGriff
  16. Mike Mussina
  17. Mariano Rivera
  18. Scott Rolen
  19. Curt Schilling
  20. Larry Walker
    I voted for Bonds and Clemens, as I have every year. For now, at least, my policy regarding players tied to PED use remains unchanged: I do not vote for players suspended under MLB's drug policy from 2005 to present, but I support the best all-around players from the complicated era that preceded it.
    Rivera is one of the clearest first-ballot Hall of Famers in history, and Halladay's dominant peak (in a hitter-friendly ballpark, against AL East competition) makes him worthy of the Hall. McGriff, overlooked for far too long, hit more home runs -- with a better adjusted OPS -- than first-ballot Hall of Famers Dave Winfield and Carl Yastrzemski; McGriff is eminently qualified for Cooperstown.
    My toughest decision came among Rolen, Vizquel and Sheffield for the last of my 10 spots. I opted for Rolen, given the overall quality of his career, at a position underrepresented in the Hall. Rolen is one of only three third basemen in history with at least seven Gold Gloves and seven All-Star appearances. The others are Brooks Robinson and Mike Schmidt.

Chris Haft

  1. Barry Bonds
  2. Roger Clemens
  3. Roy Halladay
  4. Jeff Kent
  5. Edgar Martinez
  6. Mike Mussina
  7. Mariano Rivera
  8. Curt Schilling
  9. Omar Vizquel
  10. Larry Walker
    Rivera's career forestalls debate. And if you feel free to vote for closers, you should feel free to vote for other specialists, such as Martinez the designated hitter. I dismounted my moral high horse regarding Bonds and Clemens two or three years ago. I needed some persuasion to vote for Walker; by contrast, I remained stubbornly loyal to Kent. Mussina embodied consistency; Schilling dominated the postseason and Halladay finished 98 games above .500 in just 390 starts. As for Vizquel, I pity those who can't or won't comprehend his excellence.
    Vote totals of the 6 MLB.com writers
    With 75 percent of the vote needed for entry to the Hall, Bonds, Martinez, Rivera, Mussina, Clemens, Halladay, Schilling and Walker received enough support -- the first six appearing on all six ballots, and the other two appearing on five of six ballots (83 percent) -- from MLB.com writers.
    Barry Bonds -- 6 votes
    Roger Clemens -- 6
    Roy Halladay -- 6
    Edgar Martinez -- 6
    Mike Mussina -- 6
    Mariano Rivera -- 6
    Curt Schilling -- 5
    Larry Walker -- 5
    Fred McGriff -- 2
    Manny Ramirez -- 2
    Scott Rolen -- 2
    Omar Vizquel -- 2
    Billy Wagner -- 2
    Andruw Jones -- 1
    Jeff Kent -- 1
    Gary Sheffield -- 1
    Michael Young -- 1