Globe iconLogin iconRecap iconSearch iconTickets icon
news

MLB News

Rendon's G6 gives Nats confidence boost

@juanctoribio
October 30, 2019

HOUSTON -- Anthony Rendon struggled through the first five games of this World Series, but with the Nationals facing elimination, the All-Star third baseman delivered with his best performance of the Fall Classic. Rendon carried the Nationals to a 7-2 Game 6 win over the Astros on Tuesday night at

HOUSTON -- Anthony Rendon struggled through the first five games of this World Series, but with the Nationals facing elimination, the All-Star third baseman delivered with his best performance of the Fall Classic.

Rendon carried the Nationals to a 7-2 Game 6 win over the Astros on Tuesday night at Minute Maid Park. After beginning the night batting .200 in the World Series, he recorded three hits, including a two-run home run in the seventh inning that gave the Nats a three-run lead.

Game Date Result Highlights
Gm 1 Oct. 22 WSH 5, HOU 4 Watch
Gm 2 Oct. 23 WSH 12, HOU 3 Watch
Gm 3 Oct. 25 HOU 4, WSH 1 Watch
Gm 4 Oct. 26 HOU 8, WSH 1 Watch
Gm 5 Oct. 27 HOU 7, WSH 1 Watch
Gm 6 Oct. 29 WSH 7, HOU 2 Watch
Gm 7 Oct. 30 WSH 6, HOU 2 Watch

Rendon tied a World Series record for RBIs by a third baseman in a single game with five -- matching the Astros’ Alex Bregman, who set the mark in Game 4. Before this week, no third baseman had accomplished the feat dating back to 1920, when RBIs became an official stat.

“I love Tony Rendon,” said infielder Howie Kendrick. “I admired him when I was in the American League and we played the Nationals. Just low-key and goes about his business, puts in work every day. This year he’s just been ridiculous.”

Dress for the Fall Classic with Nats gear

Rendon’s night started with an opposite-field single off Justin Verlander in the first inning that gave Washington a 1-0 lead. He didn’t hit the ball hard -- just a 93.5-mph exit velocity -- but perhaps all he needed was to see a ball get through to the outfield after his recent struggles.

“The first inning, where I had the little dribbler 12-hopper, that’s a hit,” Rendon said. “We definitely take it, but I think that’s just how crazy baseball is.”

That RBI single jump-started Rendon, then his swing in the seventh sent the Nats' dugout into a frenzy.

With the Nationals up, 3-2, Trea Turner was called out for interfering with Astros first baseman Yuli Gurriel. Manager Dave Martinez was ejected after the call remained unchanged. But during the review, Rendon sat near the dugout, calmly waiting his turn to make another impact with his bat.

And he did just that.

Rendon sent a two-run home run into the Crawford Boxes in left field, giving Washington a 5-2 lead. The home run had an exit velocity of 91.7 mph, with a 43-degree launch angle and a .010 expected batting average.

According to Statcast, the ball would have been a home run in just three parks: Fenway Park, Citizens Bank Park and Minute Maid Park. Rendon and the Nats will certainly take it.

Rendon finished his night with a two-run double in the ninth that extended the Nationals’ lead to 7-2. He now has 31 career postseason hits, matching Ryan Zimmerman for the franchise record. Rendon's 12 career postseason extra-base hits also tie Zimmerman for the club record.

Rendon also became just the fifth player in World Series history to reach base four times and record five RBIs in a game, joining Albert Pujols (2011), Ryan Howard ('08), Gary Sheffield (1997) and Kirk Gibson ('84).

“He’s really good,” Martinez said. “He hits the ball where he’s pitched, and he utilizes the whole field. And today, his last at-bat, he drove the ball to right-center field. I’ve seen him do that all year. He was on time. He was good today.”

Seeing Rendon's success at the plate on Tuesday gives the Nationals even more confidence heading into Wednesday’s Game 7. Rendon hopes to play a big role as the Nats look to become the first team to win four games on the road in the World Series.

“We’re going to continue to try and ride this wave as long as possible,” Rendon said. “We’re not going to ask questions, we’re just going to try and go out there and just have some fun.”

Juan Toribio covers the Rays for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter @juanctoribio.