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AL East title banner returned to Red Sox

September 19, 2018

For some, finding loose change on the ground qualifies as a good day.So imagine the surprise of Louie Iacuzzi, a 44-year-old from Malden, Mass., who was driving along a stretch of Massachusetts Route 28 known as McGrath Highway in nearby Somerville on Monday morning, when, according to what Iacuzzi told

For some, finding loose change on the ground qualifies as a good day.
So imagine the surprise of Louie Iacuzzi, a 44-year-old from Malden, Mass., who was driving along a stretch of Massachusetts Route 28 known as McGrath Highway in nearby Somerville on Monday morning, when, according to what Iacuzzi told The Boston Globe, he and his friends saw cars swerving to avoid an object that turned out to be a 2018 American League East championship banner that had apparently gone missing while in transit to the Red Sox.

Iacuzzi and his friends held the banner for more than 48 hours, according to the Globe. Of course, being Red Sox fans, they wanted to return it to the team, which was in position to clinch a third straight division title with a win over the Yankees on Wednesday night.
But given the novelty of their find, they didn't want to give it up too easily, asking for some form of compensation in return -- perhaps postseason tickets, with the Red Sox likely to have home-field advantage through the playoffs.
"We're trying to do the right thing, but I'm not just going to hand it to them, know what I mean?" Iacuzzi said to the Globe.
The Red Sox were undeterred. Tony Lafuente, the owner of Flagraphics, the company that made the banner, confirmed that it was indeed his banner, but said that a replacement had already been made for the ballclub.
Ultimately, the saga came to a happy conclusion, as the banner made it to its rightful home on Wednesday, when Iacuzzi brought it to Fenway Park. But in the end, he has nothing to show for his adventure except the story -- a team spokeswoman told the Globe that he and his friends received nothing in return.

Do-Hyoung Park is a reporter for MLB.com based in the Bay Area. Follow him on Twitter at @dohyoungpark.