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Sox eye power bats, starting pitching in Draft

MLB.com @IanMBrowne

The 2017 Draft will take place from Monday, June 12, through Wednesday, June 14, beginning with the Draft preview show on MLB Network and MLB.com at 6 p.m on the 12th. MLB Network will broadcast the first 36 picks (Round 1 and Competitive Balance Round A), while MLB.com will stream all 75 picks on Day 1. MLB.com will also provide live pick-by-pick coverage of Rounds 3-10 on Day 2, starting at 1 p.m. ET. Then, rounds 11-40 can be heard live on MLB.com on June 14, beginning at noon ET.

Go to MLB.com/draft to see the Top 200 Prospects list, projected top picks from MLBPipeline.com analysts Jim Callis and Jonathan Mayo, the complete order of selection and more. And follow @MLBDraft on Twitter to see what Draft hopefuls, clubs and experts are saying.

The 2017 Draft will take place from Monday, June 12, through Wednesday, June 14, beginning with the Draft preview show on MLB Network and MLB.com at 6 p.m on the 12th. MLB Network will broadcast the first 36 picks (Round 1 and Competitive Balance Round A), while MLB.com will stream all 75 picks on Day 1. MLB.com will also provide live pick-by-pick coverage of Rounds 3-10 on Day 2, starting at 1 p.m. ET. Then, rounds 11-40 can be heard live on MLB.com on June 14, beginning at noon ET.

Go to MLB.com/draft to see the Top 200 Prospects list, projected top picks from MLBPipeline.com analysts Jim Callis and Jonathan Mayo, the complete order of selection and more. And follow @MLBDraft on Twitter to see what Draft hopefuls, clubs and experts are saying.

Here's how the Draft is shaping up for the Red Sox, whose first selection is the 24th overall pick.

In About 50 Words

:: 2017 MLB Draft coverage ::

The Red Sox were thrilled to rebound from back-to-back, last-place finishes by winning the American League East last season. However, they will have to wait until close to the end of the first round to make their first selection in the Draft. With the club trading top prospects over the last couple of years to land Craig Kimbrel and Chris Sale, the Red Sox will try to start re-stocking the farm system in the Draft.

The scoop

From Jackie Bradley Jr. to Mookie Betts to Andrew Benintendi, the Red Sox have drafted and developed their share of impact position players in recent years. However, the same can't be said for pitching. After taking ultra-talented lefty Jason Groome with their top pick a year ago, look for Boston to try to land some more impact pitching in this Draft.

First-Round buzz

Though the Red Sox are certainly eyeing some arms, director of amateur scouting Mike Rikard said the club will stick with their usual "pick the best player available" philosophy. MLB.com gurus Jonathan Mayo and Jim Callis both have the Sox taking UC Irvine OF/2B Keston Hiura at No. 24. Hiura might need Tommy John surgery, which could allow him to slip to where Boston picks.

Money matters

Under the Collective Bargaining Agreement, each team has an allotted bonus pool equal to the sum of the values of that club's selections in the first 10 rounds of the Draft. The more picks a team has, and the earlier it picks, the larger the pool. The signing bonuses for a team's selections in the first 10 rounds, plus any bonus greater than $125,000 for a player taken after the 10th round, will apply toward the bonus-pool total.

Any team going up to five percent over its allotted pool will be taxed at a 75-percent rate on the overage. A team that overspends by 5-10 percent gets a 75-percent tax plus the loss of a first-round pick. A team that goes 10-15 percent over its pool amount will be hit with a 100-percent penalty on the overage and the loss of a first- and second-round pick. Any overage of 15 percent or more gets a 100-percent tax plus the loss of first-round picks in the next two Drafts.

The Red Sox have been assigned a pool of $5,667,100, which ranks 26th in the Majors. The value assigned to the Red Sox's first-round pick is $2,614,500.

Shopping list

Starting pitching and power bats are key needs for Boston's farm system.

Trend watch

After taking high schooler Groome at No. 12 last year, the Red Sox could be more inclined to take college players higher in this year's Draft because the impact at the Major League level would likely be felt sooner.

Video: Top Prospects: Jason Groome, LHP, Red Sox

Rising fast

Two years ago, Benintendi was still playing college baseball. Now, he is the starting left fielder for the Red Sox. Before Aaron Judge's early-season takeoff, many prognosticators had Benintendi winning the Rookie of the Year Award in the American League.

Video: BOS@BAL: Benintendi hits two homers, three RBIs

Cinderella story

Red Sox lefty specialist Robby Scott wasn't even drafted in 2011, despite pitching for a high-profile program at Florida State. In other words, some hidden gems could still be there even in the latest rounds of the Draft.

Video: BOS@BAL: Scott gets Davis for big out in 8th

In The Show

The Red Sox have an array of young, home-grown talent making contributions at the Major League level. The list includes Betts, Bradley, Xander Bogaerts, Christian Vazquez, Sam Travis, Brian Johnson and Matt Barnes. Bogaerts and Vazquez were signed as international free agents, but the other players were products of the Draft. And don't forget about second baseman Dustin Pedroia, who was drafted by the Red Sox in 2004 and hopes to spend his entire career with one organization.

Recent Draft History

The Red Sox' recent top picks

2016: Jason Groome, LHP, Class-A Salem

2015: Andrew Benintendi, OF, Red Sox

2014: Michael Chavis, 3B, Class-A Salem

2013: Trey Ball, Double-A Portland

2012: Deven Marrero, INF, Red Sox

Ian Browne has covered the Red Sox for MLB.com since 2002. Followhim on Twitter @IanMBrowne and Facebook.

Boston Red Sox