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Scott's first Opening Day a 'dream come true'

Lefty reliever makes first career roster after standout spring, strong 2016 in Triple-A
March 30, 2017

FORT MYERS, Fla. -- It was a joyful moment Robby Scott had on Wednesday, when he was officially informed by Red Sox manager John Farrell that he had made the Opening Day roster for the first time in his career.Scott was left undrafted out of Florida State in 2011. The

FORT MYERS, Fla. -- It was a joyful moment Robby Scott had on Wednesday, when he was officially informed by Red Sox manager John Farrell that he had made the Opening Day roster for the first time in his career.
Scott was left undrafted out of Florida State in 2011. The lefty reliever was pitching for the Independent League Yuma Scorpions when the Red Sox signed him later that summer.
At age 27, Scott will experience his first Opening Day at Fenway Park on Monday.
"I mean, it's a dream come true," said Scott on Thursday morning. "It's something I've thought about for my whole life. To have that opportunity and sit down with John and hear those words out of his mouth, it was just an absolutely incredible experience and something that I'll never forget."
The first thing Scott did after leaving Farrell's office was call his fiancée, who was there for him during those lonely moments when getting to the Major Leagues didn't seem realistic. Then he texted his parents to tell them the good news.
A day like Wednesday came within reach for Scott in 2016, when he turned in a strong body of work for Triple-A Pawtucket, notching a 2.54 ERA in 32 games. He was a September callup with the Red Sox and flourished in seven appearances, allowing no earned runs.
Though Scott struggled with his command on Thursday, walking two and allowing a hit over two-thirds of an inning in the Red Sox's 8-1 win over the Nationals, he posted a 0.77 ERA in 12 Grapefruit League appearances. The opening for the Red Sox to carry Scott as a third lefty behind Robbie Ross Jr. and Fernando Abad was created by righty setup man Tyler Thornburg opening the season on the disabled list.
"Some of the decisions are based on Spring Training," said Farrell. "We can't avoid that. But you also look at what a guy has done the previous year. That has weight to it as well. The path he's traveled is a unique one. You love the perseverance. You love the fact that the guy has earned everything he's received based on performance.
"Nothing has been attached to a status of a Draft choice or an initial investment in him. This has just been a pure performer all the way through the Minor Leagues. That's a gratifying message to give. But the reaction on his face and what he feels like in the moment, it was a good day for Robby and his family."
One thing Scott will always take pride in is how he got here.
"It's something I have to remind myself of every day," Scott said. "I come to the field and I put on my uniform, and it's something I think about on a daily basis and something I'll never forget about, because it's something that drives me to keep doing what I'm doing. I've had that drive factor almost my entire career, and it's not going to stop now."
There were various times over the past few years when Scott had a hard time envisioning the good fortune he has recently realized.
"Yeah, there was always that doubt," said Scott. "Especially when you're in the Minor Leagues, making a Minor League salary and meeting my girlfriend, who is now my fiancée. You start to think about life in general, and you have to start being realistic with yourself. There were some times when there were some doubts. But it's just a matter of perseverance, dedication and trusting the path that you're on."

Ian Browne has covered the Red Sox for MLB.com since 2002. Follow him on Twitter @IanMBrowne and Facebook.