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Cahill, Richard receive WS rings from Cubs

MLB.com @AJCassavell

CHICAGO -- Upon their return to Wrigley Field this week, Padres pitchers Clayton Richard and Trevor Cahill had 14 karats of white gold and 108 diamonds awaiting them.

Each pitcher played a part in the Cubs' 2016 World Series championship run and received their rings in the hours before Tuesday's game. The duo met with Cubs president Theo Epstein and general manager Jed Hoyer, where they were presented with their mementos without any fanfare.

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CHICAGO -- Upon their return to Wrigley Field this week, Padres pitchers Clayton Richard and Trevor Cahill had 14 karats of white gold and 108 diamonds awaiting them.

Each pitcher played a part in the Cubs' 2016 World Series championship run and received their rings in the hours before Tuesday's game. The duo met with Cubs president Theo Epstein and general manager Jed Hoyer, where they were presented with their mementos without any fanfare.

View Full Game Coverage

Neither Richard nor Cahill pitched for the Cubs in the postseason last year. Cahill posted a 2.74 ERA in 50 appearances during the regular season, but he was left off the playoff roster.

"The experience is something you're going to hold in high regard," Cahill said. "I wasn't on the roster, but they let me travel, and I think that's the biggest part -- being able to be a part of that, going through the ceremony, celebrating with the guys. The ring is just icing on the cake."

Richard, meanwhile, was released in July before signing with the Padres in August. Still, his 25 relief appearances for the Cubs last season earned him some hardware.

"It was a special part of my career, here," Richard said. "[The ring] represents the time with those teammates. That's the biggest thing. Those were a special group of guys that I got to be a part of."

Richard, who grew up a Cubs fan in Lafayette, Ind., was quick to note, "I don't wear jewelry." Moments after he received his ring, he gave it to his sister to ship it to his father.

Unlike Cahill, Richard wasn't a part of the raucous celebrations last November. But he was tuned in every step of the way.

"Unfortunately, I watched it on TV, because clearly you'd rather be playing in October," Richard said. "I watched every game. It was difficult to watch at points. But it was also fun. I really wanted those guys to do well, because I knew everything they had put into it -- the work and what it took for them to get to that spot. So I was very much a fan."

Padres outfielder Matt Szczur, also with the Cubs last season, had already received his ring by the time the Padres claimed him off waivers in May.

As for Richard and Cahill, Hoyer expressed his excitement at being able to present them with their rings.

"The reality of having a World Series ring, that's something you play for your whole career," Hoyer said. "For guys who've never gotten one, to put it on their finger and look at it, there's always that moment: 'This is mine. I'm not trying on a buddy's, this is my ring.' They were just as excited as everyone. it's been a really fun part of the year."

AJ Cassavell covers the Padres for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter @ajcassavell.

San Diego Padres