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All you need to know about Players' Weekend

MLB.com @castrovince

Sure, the name on the front of the jersey will always carry more weight than the name on the back. But when Major League Baseball and the MLB Players Association first introduced Players' Weekend in 2017, the game embraced individuality, allowing the charisma and creativity of players like "Mr. Smile" (Francisco Lindor), "Big Maple" (James Paxton) and "Wild Horse" (Yasiel Puig) to rise to the surface like never before.

Players' Weekend presented by Valspar will again bring a bright splash of color to baseball this weekend, with a relaxation of uniform rules and an opportunity for players to salute those who helped pave their paths to the bigs.

Sure, the name on the front of the jersey will always carry more weight than the name on the back. But when Major League Baseball and the MLB Players Association first introduced Players' Weekend in 2017, the game embraced individuality, allowing the charisma and creativity of players like "Mr. Smile" (Francisco Lindor), "Big Maple" (James Paxton) and "Wild Horse" (Yasiel Puig) to rise to the surface like never before.

Players' Weekend presented by Valspar will again bring a bright splash of color to baseball this weekend, with a relaxation of uniform rules and an opportunity for players to salute those who helped pave their paths to the bigs.

Here's everything you need to know about the festivities in a handy FAQ format.

:: Players' Weekend presented by Valspar Stain ::

What is Players' Weekend?

It's an opportunity for fans to get a little wider window into the personalities of the players. Established in conjunction between MLB and the MLB Players Association, all 30 clubs will be participating through all games Friday through Sunday, and every team will be in action each of those three days.

All clubs will be wearing non-traditional alternate uniforms, and each player is allowed to wear his nickname of choice on the back of his jersey, with a patch on his sleeve to pay tribute to a person or persons who aided their career.

Shop for Players' Weekend gear

Why are players wearing colorful uniforms?

The vibrant, non-traditional alternate uniforms, designed by Majestic, were inspired by uniforms you would typically see in Little League, tying into the theme of the youth involvement that Commissioner Rob Manfred has invested in since taking office ahead of the 2015 season. Players are also allowed to wear and use uniquely colored and designed spikes, batting gloves, wristbands, compression sleeves, catcher's masks, and bats.

New Era is also providing specially designed hats, and Stance is providing the colorful socks.

Video: Get ready, 2018 Players' Weekend is August 24-26

What do the patches on the players' sleeves symbolize?

On the right sleeve of each uniform will be a patch on which players can write the name of a person who either aided in their development or inspired them. The patches and caps will also feature the "Evolution" logo, showing a progression of five players increasing in size to demonstrate the process of a player's path from Little League, through youth leagues and to the Majors -- a show of solidarity with youth baseball and softball programs. Beneath the players are the words "Thank You," and then the area where the players salute someone special.

Video: Edwards Jr. reveals origin of 'Stringbean Slinger'

What are some notable nicknames to be donned on the back of jerseys?

All players have been encouraged, but are not required, to wear nicknames. You can check out the full list of nicknames for every team here.

But, yes, there are some particularly awesome appellations. Indians rookie pitcher Shane Bieber, ensuring no confusion with a certain pop star, went with "Not Justin." Though Red Sox ace Chris Sale is back on the DL, he deserves credit for the old-school and appropriate vibe of "The Conductor" (because, as teammate Dustin Pedroia said, he "punches tickets"). Angels two-way sensation Shohei Ohtani's "Showtime" is obvious but no less awesome. Same goes for Dodgers rookie Walker Buehler's "Ferris." Cardinals outfielder Marcell Ozuna is "The Big Bear," A's starter Sean Manaea is the "Manaealator," Marlins lefty Jarlin Garcia is "Jarlin the Marlin," and Cubs reliever Carl Edwards Jr. is the "Stringbean Slinger."

The best Players' Weekend nicknames

And the most creative -- and, yes, history-making -- choice goes to D-backs reliever Brad Boxberger, who will become baseball's first player with emojis on his back -- a box and a burger, naturally.

Video: Boxberger on using emojis in Players' Weekend name

Will this be an annual event?

MLB and the MLBPA haven't formally announced any plans for Players' Weekend beyond 2018, though it did align with last Sunday's MLB Little League Classic presented by GEICO, which MLB has already committed to for 2019. The Mets and Phillies each gave audiences a preview of their Players' Weekend garb in the nationally telecasted game at historic Bowman Field in Williamsport, Pa.

What are the best avenues for fans to follow the action?

Fans can follow and take part in the conversation by using the hashtag #PlayersWeekend on all social media platforms.

Ozzie Albies, Jose Berrios, Alex Bregman, Edwin Diaz, Didi Gregorius, Enrique Hernandez, Rhys Hoskins, Brandon Nimmo and Albert Pujols will be serving as Youth Ambassadors, promoting the event and connecting with young fans in advance of the weekend.

Video: Berrios on excitement over Players' Weekend

Will there be any charitable proceeds from Players' Weekend?

Game-worn jerseys from Players' Weekend will be auctioned at MLB.com/auctions, with 100 percent of proceeds to be donated to the MLB-MLBPA Youth Development Foundation, a joint effort focused on improving the caliber, effectiveness and ability of amateur baseball and softball across the U.S. and Canada.

Players will also have the opportunity to wear T-shirts highlighting a charity or cause of their choice during pregame workouts and postgame interviews.

Anthony Castrovince has been a reporter for MLB.com since 2004. Read his columns, listen to his podcast and follow him on Twitter at @Castrovince.