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These were the Top 10 A's plays of the 2010s

@goodforball
December 16, 2019

The full nickname of the Oakland A’s -- the Athletics -- suits the ballclub extremely well. For years, their roster has been decorated with exciting performers capable of making entertaining, athletic plays. The decade that’s about to conclude was no exception. Here’s a look at what a list of Oakland’s

The full nickname of the Oakland A’s -- the Athletics -- suits the ballclub extremely well.

For years, their roster has been decorated with exciting performers capable of making entertaining, athletic plays. The decade that’s about to conclude was no exception.

Here’s a look at what a list of Oakland’s top 10 plays made between 2010-19 might look like:

1) In a league of his own
Aug. 11, 2018

Ramón Laureano created a double-edged highlight by dashing from his center-field outpost to snare Justin Upton’s searing third-inning line drive, then spinning and throwing on the fly to double off Eric Young Jr.

2) Powerful peg
June 10, 2014

The Angels needed 14 innings to topple the A’s, 2-1. But the Angels might have settled matters much earlier if anybody but Yoenis Céspedes had been playing left field for Oakland. Céspedes actually fumbled Mike Trout’s one-out double, which should have scored Howie Kendrick easily from first base. But when Céspedes finally gained control of the ball, he unleashed a throw home that looked like it should have been filled with gunpowder. The relay traveled at least 300 feet and beat Kendrick to the plate.

3) Contribution to perfection
May 9, 2010

Third baseman Kevin Kouzmanoff didn’t prevent a hit when his momentum carried him into the far end of the A’s dugout after he caught Carlos Pena’s foul popup. Nevertheless, that play brought Dallas Braden closer to completing his perfect game against Tampa Bay.

4) Bleaching the Sox
April 1-4, 2019

Laureano and his remarkable throwing arm reached a zenith during a four-game home series against the reigning World Series champion Boston Red Sox, as he recorded three outfield assists in four games. He threw out Xander Bogaerts when the Boston shortstop tried to score from second base on a Mitch Moreland single and when he tried to stretch a double into a triple. He also apprehended Mookie Betts when the incumbent American League Most Valuable Player attempted to advance from first to third base on a single.

5) Donaldson takes on tarp
Sept. 3, 2013

Third baseman Josh Donaldson approached David Murphy’s sixth-inning popup and, in rapid succession, scaled the rolled-up tarpaulin, caught the ball and held onto it despite falling into the gap between the tarp and side wall.

6) Not a drop of Coco spilled
Oct. 9, 2012

Coco Crisp leapt and reaches above the center-field wall to deny Detroit’s Prince Fielder a home run in the second inning of Game 3 of the 2012 American League Division Series. The A’s triumphed, 2-0, but dropped the best-of-five series, 3-2.

7) Reddick portrays Spiderman
July 25, 2012

Right fielder Josh Reddick anchored himself by gripping the chain-link fence at Toronto with his right hand and further steadying himself with his right foot to hoist himself and snare Travis Snider’s second-inning drive.

8) Vogt of confidence
Oct. 5, 2013

This is the kind of game every catcher dreams of having. Stephen Vogt not only guided Sonny Gray and Grant Balfour through a shutout effort, but also drove in the game’s lone run with a ninth-inning single as Oakland captured Game 2 of the 2013 ALDS against Detroit.

9) Profar, Laureano preserve Fiers’ no-no
May 7, 2019

Mike Fiers received ample defensive support to help him secure his second career no-hitter in a 2-0 victory over the Cincinnati Reds. Second baseman Jurickson Profar ranged into right field to snare Kyle Farmer’s near-bloop hit. The next batter, Joey Votto, crushed a drive to center field that Laureano -- who else? -- plucked from above the wall.

10) Pure platinum
July 10, 2018

Because Platinum Glove Award-winning third baseman Matt Chapman makes an otherworldly play almost every game, singling out any one of his defensive gems is difficult. Here’s one example of his excellence: Houston’s Max Stassi topped a second-inning grounder that forced Chapman, who likes to play deep, to charge some 70 to 80 feet before he could field the ball. He scooped it up barehanded and, still on the move, fired the ball to first base for the out.

Chris Haft has covered the Major Leagues since 1991 and has worked for MLB.com since 2007. Follow him on Twitter at @goodforball.