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Two-sport star Conley passes at age 86

Three-time All-Star and World Series champion also won three NBA titles
MLB.com

World Series and three-time NBA champion Gene Conley passed away on Tuesday at the age of 86.

A right-handed pitcher during his baseball career, Conley was named to three All-Star teams and won the World Series with the 1957 Milwaukee Braves. He finished third in the National League Rookie of the Year Award voting in '54, and he was voted Comeback Player of the Year by the Baseball Writers' Association of America in '59.

World Series and three-time NBA champion Gene Conley passed away on Tuesday at the age of 86.

A right-handed pitcher during his baseball career, Conley was named to three All-Star teams and won the World Series with the 1957 Milwaukee Braves. He finished third in the National League Rookie of the Year Award voting in '54, and he was voted Comeback Player of the Year by the Baseball Writers' Association of America in '59.

Conley played in parts of 11 seasons in the Major Leagues with the Boston and Milwaukee Braves, Philadelphia Phillies and Boston Red Sox. He went 91-96 with a 3.82 ERA in 1,588 2/3 career innings.

The phenomenal two-sport athlete was also selected by the Boston Celtics in the 1952 NBA Draft and played for the team during the 1952-53 season before moving to baseball from 1954-58. Conley returned to basketball for the 1958-59 season, winning three consecutive championships with the Celtics.

Conley played power forward for Boston, averaging 5.3 points and 6.8 rebounds per game throughout four seasons with the Celtics. He also played two seasons with the Knicks, averaging 7.1 points and 5.4 rebounds per game for New York.

Born in Muskogee, Okla., Conley became the first athlete in history to win championships in two professional sports, doing so within a span of months.

Following his playing days, Conley settled down in Foxboro, Mass., where he and his wife, Katie, established the Foxboro Paper Company. He is survived by his three children and seven grandchildren.

Oliver Macklin is a reporter for MLB.com based in Washington, D.C. Follow him on Twitter at @OMacklinMLB.

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