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Ramos lands on MLB's Top 100 Prospects list

MLB.com @sfgiantsbeat

SAN FRANCISCO -- The hype surrounding Heliot Ramos hasn't begun yet, but it could soon.

Once Ramos starts participating in full-season professional leagues -- likely as soon as this year -- and more observers learn how gifted he is, the hypothetical countdown to his arrival in the Majors will become virtually audible.

SAN FRANCISCO -- The hype surrounding Heliot Ramos hasn't begun yet, but it could soon.

Once Ramos starts participating in full-season professional leagues -- likely as soon as this year -- and more observers learn how gifted he is, the hypothetical countdown to his arrival in the Majors will become virtually audible.

:: Complete 2018 Top Prospects coverage ::

The Giants drafted Ramos out of high school, so the rate of his progress could be unpredictable despite his No. 63 ranking on MLB Pipeline's Top 100 Prospects list.

Of course, Ramos' ascent could be unpredictably fast. Ask Luis Gonzalez, the five-time All-Star outfielder who spent 19 years in the big leagues. The Giants drafted Gonzalez's son, Jacob, in the second round of last year's Draft, one round after they took Ramos with the 19th overall pick.

MLB Pipeline's 2018 Top 100 Prospects list

While watching Jacob play third base for the Giants' club in the Arizona League, Gonzalez saw plenty of Ramos. To say that Ramos impressed Gonzalez would be an understatement.

"The talent and the ceiling are unbelievable in this kid," Gonzalez said.

The annual ranking of MLB's Top 100 prospects is assembled by MLB Pipeline Draft and prospect experts Jim Callis, Jonathan Mayo and Mike Rosenbaum, who compile input from industry sources, including scouts and scouting directors. It is based on analysis of players' skill sets, upsides, proximity to the Majors and potential immediate impact to their teams. Only players with rookie status entering the 2018 season are eligible for the list. Players who were at least 25 years old when they signed and played in leagues deemed to be professional (Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Cuba) are not eligible.

San Francisco hasn't drafted and developed an All-Star outfielder since Chili Davis, who played his final games for the Giants in 1987, and in the Majors in '99.

Ramos' Arizona League performance suggested that he could break this spell. Until a beaning prematurely ended his 2017 season, the right-handed hitter slashed .348/.404/.645 with six home runs, 27 RBIs and 10 stolen bases.

Gonzalez made a startling comparison between the 6-foot-2, 185-pound Ramos and an established Major League slugger.

"He reminds me of a [Yoenis] Cespedes-type power," Gonzalez said. "This guy's got some pop when he connects."

Ramos struck out 48 times in 138 at-bats, but gaining plate discipline is part of the Minor League experience. The Giants are patiently waiting.

Chris Haft has covered the Giants since 2005, and for MLB.com since 2007. Follow him on Twitter at @sfgiantsbeat and listen to his podcast.

San Francisco Giants