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Hoffman turned 7 All-Star Games into family affairs

Tony Gwynn only Padre to appear in more All-Star Games
MLB.com

It was the eve of the 1999 All-Star Game and a packed house was watching the Home Run Derby at Fenway Park.
     
But Trevor Hoffman was in the shower room of the visiting clubhouse playing his own version of Home Run Derby with two of his three young sons.
     
Trevor Hoffman's favorite All-Star Game memories are not exactly what one would expect.
     
Yes, there is the thrill of having your named announced and tipping your cap to an adoring crowd. There is the experience of being surrounded by the other greats of the game.
     
"Being selected for the National League All-Star team was always an incredible honor and experience," Hoffman said recently. "You are representing your team and your city in a classic event. It is one of the ultimate experiences in baseball. The pregame introductions choke you up."
     
But Hoffman's best memories of his All-Star Game experiences involve his family more than baseball . . . with one exception.
     
"The Boston experience in 1999 was hard to top," said Hoffman. "It was the All-Century team at Fenway Park with the return of Ted Williams. That was the All-Star Game of Ted and Tony Gwynn. Ted was holding court. The game revolved around Ted and what Ted wanted to do. It was great."
     
But even then, one of Trevor's top recollections from Boston was playing Home Run Derby with two of his three sons. "I can't even say how we first got there," said Hoffman. "But there we were. They were so small and just having the time of their lives."
     
Trevor and Tracy also have pictures of the three boys with Hoffy's mother Mikki in the outfield at Fenway Park.    
     
"Those are the best memories," said Hoffman.
     
Now, fast forward to Atlanta a year later. Major League Baseball was celebrating families -- players, their wives and children were spread around the infield. Brody was almost four. Quinn was almost three. Tracy was holding Wyatt, who was just over a year old. The Hoffmans are situated where the second baseman usually plays during the game.
     
"The National Anthem is playing and I look down and Brody and Quinn are digging this hole," Trevor recalled. "All I'm thinking about is if there's a bad hop during the game . . . it's a serious hole."
     
Fast forward again to 2009 and St. Louis and Hoffman's final All-Star Game as a member of the Milwaukee Brewers. It is the Home Run Derby again, and the three Hoffman boys are on the field supplying water and towels to the participants.
     
"They had the greatest time," said Trevor. "Made me stop and think back to a decade earlier and playing Home Run Derby in the showers at Fenway Park."
     
Six of Hoffman's seven trips to the All-Star Game came as a Padre.

It was the eve of the 1999 All-Star Game and a packed house was watching the Home Run Derby at Fenway Park.
     
But Trevor Hoffman was in the shower room of the visiting clubhouse playing his own version of Home Run Derby with two of his three young sons.
     
Trevor Hoffman's favorite All-Star Game memories are not exactly what one would expect.
     
Yes, there is the thrill of having your named announced and tipping your cap to an adoring crowd. There is the experience of being surrounded by the other greats of the game.
     
"Being selected for the National League All-Star team was always an incredible honor and experience," Hoffman said recently. "You are representing your team and your city in a classic event. It is one of the ultimate experiences in baseball. The pregame introductions choke you up."
     
But Hoffman's best memories of his All-Star Game experiences involve his family more than baseball . . . with one exception.
     
"The Boston experience in 1999 was hard to top," said Hoffman. "It was the All-Century team at Fenway Park with the return of Ted Williams. That was the All-Star Game of Ted and Tony Gwynn. Ted was holding court. The game revolved around Ted and what Ted wanted to do. It was great."
     
But even then, one of Trevor's top recollections from Boston was playing Home Run Derby with two of his three sons. "I can't even say how we first got there," said Hoffman. "But there we were. They were so small and just having the time of their lives."
     
Trevor and Tracy also have pictures of the three boys with Hoffy's mother Mikki in the outfield at Fenway Park.    
     
"Those are the best memories," said Hoffman.
     
Now, fast forward to Atlanta a year later. Major League Baseball was celebrating families -- players, their wives and children were spread around the infield. Brody was almost four. Quinn was almost three. Tracy was holding Wyatt, who was just over a year old. The Hoffmans are situated where the second baseman usually plays during the game.
     
"The National Anthem is playing and I look down and Brody and Quinn are digging this hole," Trevor recalled. "All I'm thinking about is if there's a bad hop during the game . . . it's a serious hole."
     
Fast forward again to 2009 and St. Louis and Hoffman's final All-Star Game as a member of the Milwaukee Brewers. It is the Home Run Derby again, and the three Hoffman boys are on the field supplying water and towels to the participants.
     
"They had the greatest time," said Trevor. "Made me stop and think back to a decade earlier and playing Home Run Derby in the showers at Fenway Park."
     
Six of Hoffman's seven trips to the All-Star Game came as a Padre.