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2005 World Series MVP Dye pays team a visit

MLB.com @scottmerkin

CHICAGO -- Jermaine Dye, the Most Valuable Player of the 2005 White Sox World Series championship sweep of Houston, threw out a ceremonial first pitch prior to Saturday night's game against the Indians at Guaranteed Rate Field.

Dye was in town promoting a charity golf outing that he will be hosting June 12 at the Glen Club in Glenview, Ill., in support of the Fresh Start Caring for Kids Foundation. The full-time husband, San Diego resident and father of three also took the time to talk about his special memories on the South Side of Chicago.

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CHICAGO -- Jermaine Dye, the Most Valuable Player of the 2005 White Sox World Series championship sweep of Houston, threw out a ceremonial first pitch prior to Saturday night's game against the Indians at Guaranteed Rate Field.

Dye was in town promoting a charity golf outing that he will be hosting June 12 at the Glen Club in Glenview, Ill., in support of the Fresh Start Caring for Kids Foundation. The full-time husband, San Diego resident and father of three also took the time to talk about his special memories on the South Side of Chicago.

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"I'll never forget the things we did in that season, and you'll never forget that team that we had," Dye said. "As a player, it's something you work hard every day to try to be a part of, and that's to win a World Series. I was fortunate enough to be able to accomplish that."

The right fielder hit .278 with 164 home runs, 461 RBIs and 419 runs scored over 724 games and five seasons for the White Sox (2005-09). He's still remembered fondly by the team's fan base.

"Any time you win a championship in a big city, where it hadn't been done in a long, long time, everybody remembers," Dye said. "Nobody's ever going to forget bringing a championship to this great city. It's always been great, still recognized, people still saying thank you.

"You hear stories about how people, their mom or dad, were able to see us win a championship before they passed away. You're not just going out here for the team you play on, or the name on your back and for the players on your team. You're actually also playing for a city. There are people behind you. When you're grinding away, they're grinding away mentally for you, too."

Scott Merkin has covered the White Sox for MLB.com since 2003. Read his blog, Merk's Works, follow him on Twitter @scottmerkin, on Facebook and listen to his podcast.

Chicago White Sox