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Zastryzny pulled after taking liner off calf

Davis to make Cubs debut Sunday; Rondon eyes 2nd round of WBC '17
MLB.com @CarrieMuskat

GOODYEAR, Ariz. -- Rob Zastryzny is Canadian, but his hockey days are over. He didn't try to make a kick save on a comebacker in the third inning of the Cubs' 6-2 loss to the Reds on Friday, instead taking the ball off his right calf.

"I tried that in Double-A and got a broken ankle doing it," Zastryzny said. "No more kick saves for me. I'm not a goalie any more."

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GOODYEAR, Ariz. -- Rob Zastryzny is Canadian, but his hockey days are over. He didn't try to make a kick save on a comebacker in the third inning of the Cubs' 6-2 loss to the Reds on Friday, instead taking the ball off his right calf.

"I tried that in Double-A and got a broken ankle doing it," Zastryzny said. "No more kick saves for me. I'm not a goalie any more."

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The Cubs' left-hander was scheduled to pitch three innings on Thursday but exited three batters after taking the comebacker off his right leg.

"It'll hurt tomorrow and the next day, I should be ready to go 100 percent," he said.

Zastryzny started against the Reds and was hit on the leg by Hernan Iribarren to open the third. Zastryzny stayed in the game and gave up singles to two of the next three batters, and was then pulled. Jose Peraza greeted Cubs prospect Miguel Mejia with a triple to left to drive in both runs.

"It hit me, and it didn't feel too bad," Zastryzny said. "I walked it off. Two pitches later, I could feel it tighten up. I was trying to discreetly stretch, but our trainers are too smart for that, and they caught that. They came in to get me.

"Everything felt good today and I was pretty excited about how I was throwing my cutter and working both sides of the plate," he said. "Obviously, I wish I wouldn't have gotten hit, but that's how the game goes."

The Cubs didn't want to risk injury and lifted Zastryzny. He'll be reevaluated on Friday.

Worth noting

• New Cubs closer Wade Davis will make his spring debut on Sunday, joining relievers Koji Uehara and Justin Grimm. On Saturday, Pedro Strop, Hector Rondon and Carl Edwards Jr. will make their Cactus League debuts.

Davis, who was 27-for-30 in save situations last year with the Royals, was acquired from Kansas City in December for Jorge Soler. Uehara, who posted a 3.45 ERA in 50 games in relief for the Red Sox last year, signed a one-year contract with the Cubs in December.

Video: Epstein discusses Davis acquisition, closer role

• Rondon says he's feeling good this spring and could pitch in the second round of the World Baseball Classic for the Dominican Republic team.

Rondon was part of a designated pitcher pool. Each team has the option of using the designated pitcher pool (DPP), which works like this: A team can use up to 10 designated pitchers but can't have more than two on its active roster at a time. Those "active" DPs can be replaced at the beginning of each of the next two rounds, but only by another DP. Once a DP has been replaced, he cannot return to the active roster for a subsequent round. Using Team USA as an example, Danny Duffy and Tanner Roark are the active DPs for the first round of pool play, so they can be replaced on the roster before the second round or the championship round, but only by one of the team's other DPs. And if a DP joins for the second round, he can be replaced for the championship round, but only by another DP.

Rondon, 28, missed time last season because of a strained right triceps and has yet to appear in a Cactus League game this spring.

Video: NLCS Gm4: Rondon retires Seager to seal win

• Cubs manager Joe Maddon had no problems with the rule changes announced Thursday by Major League Baseball, including a no-pitch intentional walk.

"I think it's a method to really promote the fact that the Commissioner is looking for a quicker pace of the game," Maddon said. "I don't think anybody will argue that it does substantially increase the pace. ... Standing alone, it doesnt seem significant. If you're looking at the pacakge of items, it probably makes sense to the person putting the package together.

"I think bad things can happen on intentional walks from a pitcher's perspective and good things can happen from a hitter's perspective."

Carrie Muskat has covered the Cubs since 1987, and for MLB.com since 2001. She writes a blog, Muskat Ramblings. You can follow her on Twitter @CarrieMuskat and listen to her podcast.

Chicago Cubs, Rob Zastryzny