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Halladay's role with Phils may last past camp

Guest instructor in talks to work with Minor Leaguers in Clearwater
MLB.com @ToddZolecki

CLEARWATER, Fla. -- Roy Halladay has been busy since he threw his final pitch for the Phillies in 2013.

He has 800 flight hours, planning to earn an instructor's license so he can teach his sons to fly. He is coaching one son's 12-and-under baseball team and is the pitching coach at Calvary Christian High School in Clearwater, where his 16-year-old son pitches. He is teaching kids the changeup that former Phillies pitching coach Rich Dubee taught him in Spring Training 2010.

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CLEARWATER, Fla. -- Roy Halladay has been busy since he threw his final pitch for the Phillies in 2013.

He has 800 flight hours, planning to earn an instructor's license so he can teach his sons to fly. He is coaching one son's 12-and-under baseball team and is the pitching coach at Calvary Christian High School in Clearwater, where his 16-year-old son pitches. He is teaching kids the changeup that former Phillies pitching coach Rich Dubee taught him in Spring Training 2010.

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"It's one of the easiest for young kids to be able to throw," Halladay said Tuesday morning at Spectrum Field. "It's not that complicated, it's an easy grip. And they usually get decent results out of it. The parents are thanking me. I have to go thank Dubee."

But Halladay, who is one of the greatest pitchers of his generation, wanted more, which is why he joined the Phillies this week as a guest instructor. He talked with a few other teams, but felt the Phils were the best spot for him.

"The most welcomed and the most wanted was here," he said. "And I also felt like there were the best opportunities for me to be helpful."

Tweet from @Phillies: What's up, Doc? pic.twitter.com/HedsA26Z3n

It is unclear how long Halladay will be in uniform this spring, but he and the club have discussed a role beyond Spring Training. The details are not finalized, but Halladay could work with Minor League pitchers in Clearwater throughout the season. He lives in nearby Oldsmar, Fla., so logistically it works.

"There are all kinds of options," Halladay said. "I'm going to enjoy this first week here, being a guest coach, and see where things go. We'll continue talking, but it's always trying to find a good fit, too.

"As far as coaching goes, there's a lot more to it. It's important to understand that just because you had success as a player doesn't guarantee that you're going to be a successful instructor. So I'm trying to pay attention to the guys that are that. Guys who are able to teach, and find the things that they do and find ways to talk to players that they understand and that can be helpful."

Halladay credits his work with sports psychologist Harvey Dorfman for saving his career. He could help in the mental side of the game, but there is no question he also could help pitchers on the mound, too.

"You know, whatever concerns they may have if any, or talking about things that helped me be successful, so it can cover a range of things," he said. "For me, it's just a pleasure to be able to help out. If it's throwing BP, I'll throw BP."

Halladay could be even busier in a couple of years. He is eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2019. If one considers Baseball Reference's Hall of Fame Monitor and Hall of Fame Standards, Halladay has a good shot.

"It would obviously be a tremendous honor," he said. "I don't know what to think about it, honestly. You see guys get in that are deserving and you see guys that are possibly deserving that don't get in. Boy, it's a tough thing to figure out. But absolutely I would love to be there. I think every player who ever played the game would love to be there. It would be a tremendous honor. It's just hope for the best."

Todd Zolecki has covered the Phillies since 2003, and for MLB.com since 2009. Follow him on Twitter and listen to his podcast.

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