Globe iconLogin iconRecap iconSearch iconTickets icon
news

MLB News

Schilling falls short of Hall in 8th year on ballot

@ToddZolecki
January 21, 2020

PHILADELPHIA -- Curt Schilling fell short of Cooperstown again, but he is trending in the right direction. He still has time. Schilling learned Tuesday that he will not be inducted into the Hall of Fame this summer, after his name appeared on 70 percent of ballots cast by the Baseball

PHILADELPHIA -- Curt Schilling fell short of Cooperstown again, but he is trending in the right direction. He still has time.

Schilling learned Tuesday that he will not be inducted into the Hall of Fame this summer, after his name appeared on 70 percent of ballots cast by the Baseball Writers’ Association of America.

The former Phillies ace needed to appear on 75 percent of the ballots cast for enshrinement in Cooperstown, N.Y., on July 26, but he fell just 20 votes shy of the 298 votes needed. It is a disappointing result for Schilling, but he has two years of eligibility remaining and momentum on his side. His vote percentage has increased each of the past three years since he appeared on 45 percent of ballots in 2017, rising to 51.2 percent in '18 and 60.9 percent in '19.

Complete 2020 Hall of Fame election results

Derek Jeter and Larry Walker were the only players elected into the Class of 2020 by the BBWAA. Jeter appeared on 99.7 percent of the ballots. Walker appeared on 76.6 percent of ballots in his 10th and final year of eligibility.

Schilling, whose career spanned 20 years and five teams, first blossomed in Philadelphia, where he was a three-time All-Star. In all, the right-hander won 216 games and posted a 3.46 ERA (127 ERA+) and a 4.38 strikeout-to-walk ratio that is the best in the modern era among those with at least 2,000 innings. His postseason exploits, including the famous “bloody sock” game with Boston in the 2004 ALCS and his co-MVP honor in the 2001 World Series with Arizona, added to his argument.

Schilling's top career moments

Schilling was one of six players with Phillies connections on the ballot. Scott Rolen (35.3 percent) and Billy Wagner (31.7 percent) improved their vote percentages from 2019. Rolen and Wagner appeared on 17.2 percent and 16.7 percent of ballots last year, respectively.

This was Rolen’s third year on the ballot and Wagner’s fifth. Like Schilling, they still have time and are trending the right way.

Bobby Abreu appeared on just 5.5 percent of ballots in his first year of eligibility. Players need five percent of the vote to remain on the ballot. His candidacy is interesting because he has Hall of Fame-type numbers, but he's on the outside looking in. He slashed .291/.395/.475 in his career. He had 2,470 hits and stole 400 bases. He played in more than 150 games in 13 consecutive seasons (1998-2010). His 1,990 games in right field rank 11th on the all-time list.

Abreu posted a 60.0 career WAR, according to Baseball-Reference, and a 59.8 career WAR, according to FanGraphs.

Baseball-Reference’s Hall of Fame Monitor gives Abreu a score of 94. A score of 100 means a likely Hall of Famer. Its Hall of Fame Standards gives Abreu a score of 54. The average Hall of Famer has a score of 50. The JAWS system ranks Abreu as the 20th-best right fielder in baseball history with a 60.0 career WAR and a 41.6 WAR over a seven-year peak. The average right fielder has a 71.5 career WAR and a 42.1 WAR over a seven-year peak.

Cliff Lee (0.5 percent) and Raúl Ibañez (0.3 percent) were on the ballot for the first time. They will not return.

Todd Zolecki has covered the Phillies since 2003, and for MLB.com since 2009. Follow him on Twitter and Facebook .