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Will Padres seek long-term deal for Galvis?

Beat reporter AJ Cassavell answers questions from fans
MLB.com @AJCassavell

What are the realistic chances that Freddy Galvis is in San Diego for longer than a year?
-- Kevin C.

The way the front office has spoken about Galvis, it sure seems like a possibility. The Padres clearly see value in Galvis -- especially on the defensive side. And general manager A.J. Preller has made it clear he wouldn't mind keeping Galvis in San Diego long term. Galvis is not a one-year stopgap in the same vein as Clint Barmes, Alexei Ramirez and Erick Aybar were for the club.

What are the realistic chances that Freddy Galvis is in San Diego for longer than a year?
-- Kevin C.

The way the front office has spoken about Galvis, it sure seems like a possibility. The Padres clearly see value in Galvis -- especially on the defensive side. And general manager A.J. Preller has made it clear he wouldn't mind keeping Galvis in San Diego long term. Galvis is not a one-year stopgap in the same vein as Clint Barmes, Alexei Ramirez and Erick Aybar were for the club.

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At 28, Galvis is still in his prime. And while the Padres have a number of talented young infield prospects on the horizon, that doesn't mean there's no place for Galvis. In fact, the opposite could be true. If Galvis would be willing to take on a bit of a utility role, he could be the perfect mentor for Luis Urias and Fernando Tatis Jr., ranked the club's No. 3 and 4 prospects by MLBPipeline.com.

Galvis is going to test the open market next offseason. The Padres now have an entire season to figure out what resources -- if any -- they'd like to commit to bringing him back. It's a tossup.

Video: Padres shore up shortstop via trade for Galvis

What's the backup plan, in case the Padres don't land Eric Hosmer?
-- Pog L.

I suspect the backup plan is simply to stay the course. Hosmer is a luxury and not a necessity, considering Wil Myers -- who currently owns the largest contract in franchise history -- already mans first base. It's not an area of need.

If the Padres don't sign Hosmer, they're not about to spend on a first baseman in his stead. They'd likely set about the remainder of the offseason looking to acquire affordable options in the rotation and 'pen, along with a backup catcher. (Those are the primary areas of need regardless of whether they land Hosmer.)

Video: Green discusses pursuit of Hosmer, Myers' versatility

Signing Hosmer, of course, would take a serious commitment -- likely larger than the six-years and $83 million the Padres guaranteed Myers in January. The money they'd save by passing on Hosmer could theoretically be used next offseason on a solid long-term rotation piece or a different lefty bat.

Does Carlos Asuaje have the ability to play third base in the future when Urias is promoted?
-- Danny J., San Diego

Urias' arrival -- which could come sometime this season -- has been on the Padres' radar for a long time. And yet, they still haven't played Asuaje anywhere other than second base at the big league level. That says it all.

The Padres view Asuaje as a second baseman exclusively, and they love the strides he's made on defense. He showed up for 2017 much rangier and quicker around the bag than the previous year.

Video: PEO@SUR: Urias lines a double to drive in a pair

If Urias can establish himself as a Major League option, the club will have a decision to make at second. But it doesn't look like the answer to that question is for Asuaje to move to third. More likely: Urias' emergence could force the Padres into a trade next offseason. (Hey, it's still possible Asuaje gets moved this winter.)

Which current pitching prospect in the Padres' system is most likely to get 12 big league starts this year? Joey Lucchesi, Cal Quantrill, Eric Lauer, other or none?
-- Dan, San Diego

Twelve starts is a high bar for an organization without a big league-ready arm currently in the Minors. All three pitchers mentioned above will get Major League invites to Spring Training. But barring something unforeseen, none will make the Opening Day roster.

I'd rule out Quantrill and Lauer. Both were very good at Class A Advanced Lake Elsinore last season. But their promotion to Double-A proved a challenge. Lucchesi, meanwhile, took the same trajectory. But he was actually better when tasked with facing Double-A hitters. Lucchesi, the oldest of the bunch by two years, posted a 1.79 ERA in 10 games for San Antonio.

If his quick progression continues, he could be in line for a second-half callup. If there's any Minor Leaguer in line for 12 starts this season, it's either him or Triple-A righty Walker Lockett (who's not currently in the club's Top 30 Prospects list).

AJ Cassavell covers the Padres for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter @ajcassavell.

 

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