Globe iconLogin iconRecap iconSearch iconTickets icon

news

MLB News

Former big league lefty Halsey dies at 33

MLB.com

Former Major League left-hander Brad Halsey died last week at the age of 33, according to a tweet by Halsey's agency, O'Connell Sports.

According to a report from USA Today citing anonymous sources, Halsey's death occurred Friday in a recreational climbing accident near his home in New Braunfels, Texas.

Former Major League left-hander Brad Halsey died last week at the age of 33, according to a tweet by Halsey's agency, O'Connell Sports.

According to a report from USA Today citing anonymous sources, Halsey's death occurred Friday in a recreational climbing accident near his home in New Braunfels, Texas.

Halsey's agency first tweeted the news on Tuesday night: "We are sorry to hear of the passing of longtime client, Brad Halsey. Our thoughts & prayers are with his family during this difficult time."

The southpaw spent three years in the Majors from 2004-06, pitching one season each with the Yankees, D-backs and Athletics. The lefty appeared in 88 career games, making 40 starts, and he went 14-19 with a 4.84 ERA.

According to Bob Nightengale's story in USA Today, the Comal (Texas) County Sheriff's Office is investigating Halsey's death and will not release any information until the case is closed.

Halsey was selected by the Yankees in the eighth round of the 2002 First-Year Player Draft out of the University of Texas. In addition to stops in Arizona and Oakland, he spent time in the Dodgers' organization.

Halsey won his first Major League start in June 2004, giving up two runs in 5 2/3 innings for the Yankees against the Dodgers in Los Angeles.

His last Major League appearance came for the A's in 2006. But Halsey was involved in a number of high-profile baseball moments over his career, including the '05 D-backs-Yankees trade involving Javier Vazquez and Randy Johnson; surrendering Barry Bonds' 714th career home run in '06; and starting for the Yankees against the Red Sox in the '04 game in which Derek Jeter famously dove into the stands for a foul ball.

Austin Laymance is a reporter for MLB.com. Joey Nowak is a reporter for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter at @joeynowak.