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Inbox: How is the Rays' trade haul looking?

Beat reporter Bill Chastain answers questions from fans
MLB.com @wwchastain

Can you believe the haul the Rays got for Chris Archer? Tyler Glasnow looks like he can be a No. 1 starter, and I'm looking forward to seeing Austin Meadows when they bring him to Tropicana Field. The Rays should be so lucky in all of their deals.
-- Brad C., Tampa, Fla.

I'll tell you what, Glasnow has been impressive. In three starts, the right-hander has allowed three runs on six hits and three walks while striking out 20 in 12 innings. And I'm looking forward to seeing Meadows play, too. But I think it's too early to judge this trade just yet. I do think it will be good for Archer to get a fresh start with Pittsburgh. And again, Glasnow looks really, really good.

Can you believe the haul the Rays got for Chris Archer? Tyler Glasnow looks like he can be a No. 1 starter, and I'm looking forward to seeing Austin Meadows when they bring him to Tropicana Field. The Rays should be so lucky in all of their deals.
-- Brad C., Tampa, Fla.

I'll tell you what, Glasnow has been impressive. In three starts, the right-hander has allowed three runs on six hits and three walks while striking out 20 in 12 innings. And I'm looking forward to seeing Meadows play, too. But I think it's too early to judge this trade just yet. I do think it will be good for Archer to get a fresh start with Pittsburgh. And again, Glasnow looks really, really good.

:: Submit a question to the Rays Inbox ::

Why did the Rays trade Wilson Ramos away for a song? He's the best catcher in franchise history. We've gone years without having a solid backstop, and Ramos was an All-Star. He's a free agent after the season. Do you think there's a chance they'll sign him?
-- Bob D., St. Petersburg

First, I totally get the trade. Ramos was in the back end of a two-year deal. And the fact he was on the disabled list further diminished his trade value. Given what the Rays seem to be doing, which is cashing in their older assets to go with younger players, I don't see them re-signing Ramos.

OK, I get it -- the Rays love Willy Adames, and they want to see if he can play a little bit. And since they gave him the shortstop job, he's played better. What I don't get is why they gave up on Adeiny Hechavarria. He might be the best fielding shortstop the Rays have had, and he's just 29. Doesn't that qualify him, age-wise, for what they're trying to do? I would rather have seen the team slide Adames over to second and keep Hechavarria.
-- Barry A., Clearwater, Fla.

While I'll agree with you that Hechavarria could field the position rather well -- see the six errors total that he made in 492 chances with the Rays -- the club believes it has an all-around shortstop in Adames. All of the scouts I've talked to agree with that viewpoint.

The Rays have had good fortune using their "openers" and having bullpen days this season. Do you think going forward they will use openers and bullpen days?
-- Ken C., Tampa, Fla.

Based on the effectiveness of their innovative pitching methods, I do believe they will continue to use both, but in a modified form. I can see them having two or three traditional starters, then using relievers for the other two or three days. It should be fun to watch and see what they do.

As a longtime fan going back to Devil Rays days, I'm discouraged at the gap in the standings between the Rays and the first-place Red Sox. Is there any hope of closing that gap?
-- Ben L., Tampa, Fla.

Boston is on track for one of the best seasons in Major League history, and that happens sometimes. As for the Rays, I've marveled at what they've done this season. They've turned over the team and continued to play well throughout. Going forward, I believe this core group of players will lead the team to some exciting times to where they will be challenging the Red Sox and Yankees for the American League East title.

Bill Chastain has covered the Rays for MLB.com since 2005.

Tampa Bay Rays

Glasnow paying dividends despite Rays' loss

Tampa Bay unable to back right-hander, who allows 1 run in five-plus innings
MLB.com

TORONTO -- Early returns on Tyler Glasnow have continued to impress, as the 24-year-old struck out six over five-plus innings on Sunday.

The 24-year-old left the game after surrendering a leadoff walk to Luke Maile in the sixth inning that eventually came around to score, the only run surrendered by Glasnow in a 2-1 loss to the Blue Jays at Rogers Centre.

View Full Game Coverage

TORONTO -- Early returns on Tyler Glasnow have continued to impress, as the 24-year-old struck out six over five-plus innings on Sunday.

The 24-year-old left the game after surrendering a leadoff walk to Luke Maile in the sixth inning that eventually came around to score, the only run surrendered by Glasnow in a 2-1 loss to the Blue Jays at Rogers Centre.

View Full Game Coverage

"Similar strike throwing, this time he had to kind of pitch out of some jams, which was good to see," Rays manager Kevin Cash said. "Another really really strong performance."

Video: TB@TOR: Wendle jumps high to rob Granderson

Glasnow got into trouble in the fourth inning, giving up a leadoff single to Devon Travis who quickly stole second, then moved to third on a Justin Smoak groundout. The Rays brought their infield in to hold the one-run lead, but Glasnow got Randal Grichuk swinging on a breaking ball that bounced in the dirt. He then fanned Teoscar Hernandez on a 98.7-mph fastball to end the inning.

"When you see Major league hitters like we did today … when they're swinging at 55-foot breaking balls, it's pretty telling how electric his stuff can be," Cash said.

Video: TB@TOR: Cash on Glasnow's solid pitching performance

Glasnow threw a season-high 79 pitches, 60.8 percent of them for strikes. His fastball sat at 97.1 mph and maxed out at 99.7 mph on the afternoon. Entering play Sunday, he had the third hardest average fastball for Major League starting pitchers, just behind Luis Severino (97.6) and Noah Syndergaard (97.5).

Video: TB@TOR: Perez catches Travis trying to steal second

"I went through the Minor Leagues starting, so going back out there is a familiar feeling," Glasnow said. "I've been feeling good recently, just some physical adjustments and just going out there with some confidence is helping me."

After Willy Adames singled in a run in the fourth, Tampa Bay gave up the lead in the sixth inning when Jose Alvarado allowed a pinch-hit double to Kevin Pillar and then a single to Travis that scored Maile to tie the game. Then two batters later, Pillar scored the go-ahead run on a fielder's choice from Grichuk.

Video: TB@TOR: Adames knocks in Wendle on single to left

Alvarado recorded just one out and was followed by Ryne Stanek, who pitched two-thirds of an inning. Then Ryan Yarbrough finished the afternoon.

Marcus Stroman went five innings for the Blue Jays, allowing just one run and five hits, but exited the game early with a developing blister.

Video: TB@TOR: Bauers robs Pillar, turns two in 8th

"[Stroman] did a nice job of getting some cutters into lefties, we just couldn't make the adjustment," Cash said. "It seemed like he had it going pretty good, then they turned it over to the bullpen and everybody followed suit."

Danny Barnes got into trouble in the seventh inning, but Tyler Clippard shut down the Rays' offense before Ken Giles closed out the game and recorded the save.

MOMENT THAT MATTERED
Rays can't convert in seventh:
After a pair of quick outs, Brandon Lowe walked before moving to third on Perez's single. Blue Jays manager John Gibbons yanked Barnes, and Clippard forced Mallex Smith to ground out to second.

Video: TB@TOR: Clippard wiggles out of trouble in the 7th

MITEL REPLAY OF THE DAY
Grichuk hit a dribbler just in front of the plate that Michael Perez corralled and looked off Pillar at third before firing to first base for the second out of the inning. As Perez made the throw, Pillar came charging down for home forcing a play at the plate, but the Blue Jays center fielder slid around Stanek's tag for the go-ahead run. Tampa Bay challenged the play, but the call stood, meaning there was not enough evidence to overturn the call.

Video: TB@TOR: Pillar beats throw to plate for go-ahead run

"Initially I was thinking about making a fake throw, but looking at the runner going to first base, he was half way down the line already so I decided to make the sure out at first," Perez said through a translator. "I mean it was a good play from Pillar, he had a good read on it, and it was close at the plate."

ROSTER MOVES
The Rays will activate right-hander Chaz Roe from the 10-day disabled list prior to Tuesday's game against the Yankees. Roe has a 3.60 ERA over 35 innings this season. Right-hander Jaime Schultz was optioned to Triple-A Durham following Sunday's game.

SOUND SMART
Adames recorded his third consecutive multihit game, the longest multihit streak of his career. He has hits in each of his last six games and has hit .353 over his last 15 games.

UP NEXT
The Rays head to New York for a three-game series against the Yankees starting Tuesday. Tampa Bay has lost 12 consecutive series at Yankee Stadium, the longest streak ever by any team in the current building, and they have lost the series opener 11 straight series. No starter has been announced for either team.

Aaron Rose is a reporter for MLB.com based in Toronto.

Tampa Bay Rays, Tyler Glasnow

Franco makes Pipeline Team of the Week

MLB.com @JimCallisMLB

MLB Pipeline's Prospect Team of the Week honors the best performances from the previous seven days. Any Minor Leaguer currently on an organization Top 30 Prospects list on our Prospect Watch is eligible.

A strained patellar tendon in his left knee sidelined Vladimir Guerrero Jr. for five weeks, and that's apparently the only way to stop baseball's best prospect from hitting. Since coming back in mid-July, the Blue Jays third baseman has breezed through a four-game rehab assignment, homered three times in seven games when he returned to Double-A and laughed at Triple-A pitching.

MLB Pipeline's Prospect Team of the Week honors the best performances from the previous seven days. Any Minor Leaguer currently on an organization Top 30 Prospects list on our Prospect Watch is eligible.

A strained patellar tendon in his left knee sidelined Vladimir Guerrero Jr. for five weeks, and that's apparently the only way to stop baseball's best prospect from hitting. Since coming back in mid-July, the Blue Jays third baseman has breezed through a four-game rehab assignment, homered three times in seven games when he returned to Double-A and laughed at Triple-A pitching.

:: Complete prospect coverage ::

Just 19, Guerrero homered in four straight contests last week, batted .458/.458/1.000 in six games overall and claimed his record fifth Prospect Team of the Week accolade of 2018. That's a single-season record since we started the PTOW in 2015, eclipsing AJ Reed ('15), Kyle Schwarber ('15), Gary Sanchez ('16) and Brendan Rodgers ('17), who each had four mentions.

Guerrero also notched the sixth PTOW honor of his career, leaving him one behind Lewis Brinson, Tyler O'Neill and Rodgers for the most all-time. He leads the Minors in hitting (.400), slugging (.681), OPS (1.135) and ranks second in on-base percentage (.454).

Below is the complete PTOW, based on games from Aug. 6-12:

2018 Prospect Teams of the Week

C: Deon Stafford, West Virginia Power (low Class A)
(Pirates' No. 30 prospect)
.364/.400/.773, 6 G, 22 AB, 8 R, 8 H, 1 2B, 1 3B, 2 HR, 9 RBI, 2 BB, 4 SO

Stafford drove in six runs on Saturday, snapping a 1-1 tie with a two-run double in the eighth inning and then swatting a grand slam in the ninth. His big night propelled him to his second PTOW of the year and improved his season line to .267/.326/.445 with eight homers in 76 games.

1B: Michael Chavis, Portland Sea Dogs (Double-A)
(Red Sox's No. 1 prospect/MLB No. 99)
.560/.593/.880, 6 G, 25 AB, 7 R, 14 H, 2 2B, 2 HR, 6 RBI, 1 BB, 7 SO, 1 SB

Chavis placed third in the Minors with 68 extra-base hits and fifth with 31 homers in 2017, and he's back slugging after serving an 80-game suspension after testing positive for a performance-enhancing substance during the offseason. He homered twice on Thursday, topped all Minor Leaguers with 14 hits last week and is batting .309/.404/.556 with five homers in 22 Double-A games.

2B: Bret Boswell, Lancaster JetHawks (Class A Advanced)
(Rockies' No. 29 prospect)
.409/.464/.955, 6 G, 22 AB, 7 R, 9 H, 3 2B, 3 HR, 8 RBI, 4 BB, 10 SO, 1 SB

Lancaster might be the most favorable hitting enviroment in the Minors and Boswell has taken advantage since his July 31 promotion, going deep twice on Wednesday and collecting four hits on Thursday. Between two Class A stops, he's batting .295/.338/.526 with 22 homers in 108 games during his first full pro season.

3B: Vladimir Guerrero Jr., Buffalo Bisons (Triple-A)
(Blue Jays' No. 1 prospect/MLB No. 1)
.458/.458/1.000, 6 G, 24 AB, 5 R, 11 H, 1 2B, 4 HR, 5 RBI, 2 SO

Guerrero is now batting .395/.489/.763 through 12 Triple-A games after hitting .402/.449/.671 in Double-A. He has as many homers as strikeouts (four) in Triple-A and has whiffed in just 9.8 percent of his overall plate appearances -- and remember he's just 19. Guerrero's career line: .333/.417/.534 with 109 extra-base hits, 139 walks and 129 strikeouts in 258 games.

Watch: Vlad Jr. goes yard

SS: Wander Franco, Princeton Rays (Rookie)
(Rays' No. 4 prospect/MLB No. 40)
.500/.571/.708, 6 G, 24 AB, 7 R, 12 H, 2 2B, 1 HR, 11 RBI, 4 BB, 2 SO

The youngest and best of the three brothers named Wander Franco currently playing in the Minors, he was the top international amateur on the 2017 market. Making his pro debut at age 17, he has reached base in 40 consecutive games and collected at least one hit and one RBI in each of his six games last week to make the PTOW for the second time. Franco is the second-youngest regular in the Appalachian League and tops the circuit in batting, hits (65), total bases (108) and RBIs (45) while hitting .367/.421/.610 with eight homers in 44 games.

OF: Austin Dean, New Orleans Baby Cakes (Triple-A)
(Marlins' No. 29 prospect)
.647/.700/1.353, 5 G, 17 AB, 7 R, 11 H, 3 2B, 3 HR, 7 RBI, 3 BB, 5 SO

Dean was arguably the hottest hitter in the Minors last week, leading everyone in slugging (1.353) and OPS (2.053) while ranking second in batting (.647) and third in on-base percentage (.700). He already has established career highs in most categories this year, posting a combined .346/.412/.514 line with 12 homers in 108 games between Double-A and Triple-A.

Watch: Dean blasts off

OF: Alek Thomas, Missoula Osprey (Rookie)
(D-backs' No. 6 prospect)
.467/.600/1.000, 4 G, 15 AB, 10 R, 7 H, 2 2B, 2 HR, 4 RBI, 5 BB, 4 SO

A second-round pick in June, Thomas hit his first professional home run on Thursday and went deep again on Sunday, part of a week in which he reached bases 12 times in four games and led all Minor Leaguers with 10 runs. He's hitting .348/.417/.484 in 37 games between two Rookie levels.

Watch: Thomas rips double

OF: Kyle Tucker, Fresno Grizzlies (Triple-A)
(Astros' No. 2 prospect/MLB No. 8)
.471/.471/1.059, 4 G, 17 AB, 8 R, 8 H ,1 2B, 3 HR, 6 RBI, 3 SO, 2 SB

Tucker began the week by homering in three consecutive games and finished it in Houston after getting called up to replace the injured Jake Marisnick. His second PTOW mention of 2018 is the sixth of his career, tying him with J.D. Davis, Guerrero and Jordan Patterson for one shy of the all-time lead. Tucker is batting .311/.373/.532 with 17 homers and 17 steals in 89 games, though he's just 7-for-48 (.146) in the big leagues.

Watch: Tucker connects on homer

LHP: Joe Palumbo, Down East Wood Ducks (Class A Advanced)
(Rangers' No. 8 prospect)
0-0, 0.00 ERA, 1 G, 5 IP, 2 H, 0 R, 0 ER, 0 BB, 11 SO, 0.40 WHIP

Palumbo had his best outing since having Tommy John surgery in 2017, striking out 11 of the 18 batters he faced in five scoreless innings on Tuesday. He now has a 3.52 ERA, 40/4 K/BB ratio and .225 opponent average in 30 2/3 innings between Rookie ball and high Class A.

RHP: Deivi Garcia, Tampa Tarpons (Class A Advanced)
(Yankees' No. 12 prospect)
0-0, 0.00 ERA, 1 G, 7 IP, 0 H, 0 R, 0 ER, 0 BB, 12 SO, 0.00 WHIP

Garcia would have had a perfect game in the nightcap of a doubleheader last Monday, but Tampa couldn't score and lost both the perfecto and the game thanks to an error in the eighth inning. Just 19, he's having no trouble handling Class A hitters, logging a 3.10 ERA, 82/13 K/BB ratio and a .176 opponent average in 52 1/3 innings between two stops.

RP: Jose Ruiz, Birmingham Barons (Double-A)
(White Sox No. 24 prospect)
0-0, 0.00 ERA, 2 G, 1 SV, 3 IP, 0 H, 0 R, 0 ER, 0 BB, 4 SO, 0.00 WHIP

The White Sox claimed Ruiz off waivers from the Padres last December and may have gotten a steal. He retired all nine batters he faced last week, four via strikeouts, and has a 3.20 ERA, 70/18 K/BB ratio and .184 opponent average in 50 2/3 innings between high Class A and Double-A.

Jim Callis is a reporter for MLB.com. Follow @jimcallisMLB on Twitter. Listen to him on the weekly Pipeline Podcast.

Bullpen of the Week: Rays

Relievers post 2.14 ERA to help Tampa go 4-2
MLB.com @MannyOnMLB

The Rays went 4-2 last week to improve to 60-58 this season, continuing to defy the odds in large part thanks to a unique bullpen strategy and a solid performance from the relief corps. That continued with Tampa Bay's bullpen posting a 2.14 ERA over 33 2/3 innings from Aug. 6-12 to earn the MLB Bullpen of the Week presented by The Hartford honors.

As part of The Hartford Prevailing Moments program, each Monday throughout the 2018 season, MLB.com is honoring the MLB Bullpen of the Week presented by The Hartford. An industry-wide panel of MLB experts, including legendary stats guru Bill James, constructed a metric based on James' widely renowned game-score formula, to provide a weekly measurement of team-bullpen performance.

The Rays went 4-2 last week to improve to 60-58 this season, continuing to defy the odds in large part thanks to a unique bullpen strategy and a solid performance from the relief corps. That continued with Tampa Bay's bullpen posting a 2.14 ERA over 33 2/3 innings from Aug. 6-12 to earn the MLB Bullpen of the Week presented by The Hartford honors.

As part of The Hartford Prevailing Moments program, each Monday throughout the 2018 season, MLB.com is honoring the MLB Bullpen of the Week presented by The Hartford. An industry-wide panel of MLB experts, including legendary stats guru Bill James, constructed a metric based on James' widely renowned game-score formula, to provide a weekly measurement of team-bullpen performance.

Here's how the Bullpen Rating System is compiled for each week. For reference, a weekly score of 100 is considered outstanding:

• Add 1.5 points for each out recorded
• Add 1.5 points for each strikeout
• Add 5 points for a save
• Subtract 2 points for each hit allowed
• Subtract 4 points for each earned run allowed
• Subtract 2 points for each unearned run allowed
• Subtract 1 point for each walk
• Subtract 5 points for a blown save

With a score of 107.0, the Rays edged the Angels (106.5) by the slimmest of margins. Led by 23-year-old left-hander Jose Alvarado, who despite a hiccup Sunday posted a 2.70 ERA with six strikeouts and no walks in 3 1/3 innings, Rays relievers struck out 27 and walked seven, holding opposing hitters to a .198 batting average during the week.

The unexpected: Rookie right-hander Yonny Chirinos was called upon to enter a game in relief as early as the third inning for the first time in his career last Thursday, with the Rays trailing the Orioles, 3-0, at Tropicana Field. It was just the third relief appearance (seven starts) of the 24-year-old's career.

How they prevailed: Chirinos rose to the occasion, yielding one run on three hits, walking none and striking out four over five innings to keep Tampa Bay in the game long enough for the Rays to chip away at the deficit and come back to win the contest, 5-4. Chirinos turned the baseball over to Alvarado for a scoreless eighth inning, and veteran right-hander Sergio Romo came on to close the game with a 1-2-3 ninth.

Manny Randhawa is a reporter for MLB.com based in Denver. Follow him on Twitter at @MannyOnMLB.

Tampa Bay Rays

Each team's jersey number likely to be retired next

MLB.com @williamfleitch

Over the weekend, the Giants retired the No. 25 worn by Barry Bonds and the Tigers retired Jack Morris' No. 47. Bonds became the 12th Giant and Morris the seventh Tiger so honored (along with Jackie Robinson's No. 42 for both teams, of course). Bonds played for the Giants for 15 seasons and Morris pitched for the Tigers for 14 years and was just inducted into the Hall of Fame: It was a no-brainer for the Tigers once he was in.

This whole exercise got us thinking: Which active players might end up with their own jerseys retired? Who potentially has that immortality in their future? Thus, this week at The Thirty, in honor of Bonds and Morris, we take a look at the most likely active player to someday have their number retired for every team. Note the wording there, by the way: The player has to be active, but he does not have to be actively playing for the team that will retire his number at this specific moment.

Over the weekend, the Giants retired the No. 25 worn by Barry Bonds and the Tigers retired Jack Morris' No. 47. Bonds became the 12th Giant and Morris the seventh Tiger so honored (along with Jackie Robinson's No. 42 for both teams, of course). Bonds played for the Giants for 15 seasons and Morris pitched for the Tigers for 14 years and was just inducted into the Hall of Fame: It was a no-brainer for the Tigers once he was in.

This whole exercise got us thinking: Which active players might end up with their own jerseys retired? Who potentially has that immortality in their future? Thus, this week at The Thirty, in honor of Bonds and Morris, we take a look at the most likely active player to someday have their number retired for every team. Note the wording there, by the way: The player has to be active, but he does not have to be actively playing for the team that will retire his number at this specific moment.

Now, some of these teams have a rule that they won't retire anyone's number who wasn't elected to the Hall of Fame. In this case, if there is no obvious Hall of Fame candidate, when necessary, we'll pick the player most likely to be inducted into the team's Hall of Fame. But the general principle remains: Who's the active player most likely to go down in history for each specific franchise? Here's our list.

AMERICAN LEAGUE EAST

Blue Jays
19: Jose Bautista

This is probably the last year for Bautista, who is peddling his wares for the Mets, his second team this season. This jersey retirement probably won't end up happening, so they may just have to do a statue of his bat flip.

Video: MLB Tonight uses Statcast™ on Bautista's bat flip

Orioles
10: Adam Jones

Jones may be traded in August, but he'll be forever an Oriole. He's Captain America for crying out loud.

Rays
3: Evan Longoria

He's the best player in franchise history by a wide, wide margin.

Red Sox
15: Dustin Pedroia

Pedroia is already one of the franchise's 10 best players by WAR (per Baseball Reference) in history, and if he ever gets healthy again, he'll pass David Ortiz (whose No. 34 is already retired) in a matter of weeks. Also, those two World Series championships don't hurt.

Video: 2007 WS Gm1: Dustin Pedroia leads off with homer
Yankees
99: Aaron Judge

It's obviously early, but it's not like anyone else is clamoring for the number.

AL CENTRAL

Indians
12: Francisco Lindor

This is a tough call: Corey Kluber (28) is right there, too, but Lindor could be here for decades to come as a franchise icon.

Royals
13: Salvador Perez

Anybody else get the feeling that come 2028 we're going to be having the same Hall of Fame arguments about Perez that we're having about Yadier Molina right now?

Video: Perez receives World Series MVP Award in presentation

Tigers
24: Miguel Cabrera

Cabrera will end up having been a Tiger for 16 years by the time his contract is over … and heck, maybe even longer.

Video: WS2012 Gm3: Miggy receives trophy for Triple Crown

Twins
7: Joe Mauer

Remember, Kent Hrbek has a statue outside Target Field. If he has a statue, they should probably just name the stadium after Mauer.

White Sox
49: Chris Sale

Probably pushing it here, but if he ends up spending longer than seven years -- the amount of time he spent with the White Sox -- with any other team, we'll be surprised.

AL WEST

Angels
27: Mike Trout

Sorry, Vlad.

Astros
27: Jose Altuve

The jersey might be retired before the player is.

Video: Watch Jose Altuve's top 10 moments of the 2017 season

Athletics
26: Matt Chapman

Without question the toughest call on the board, but we'll just imagine a theoretical future where he turns into Brooks Robinson and plays with the A's for the next 15 years.

Mariners
51: Ichiro Suzuki

He's not technically retired yet, remember.

Video: A look at Ichiro's first and last hits in the Majors

Rangers
29: Adrian Beltre

If only he could have won one of those World Series…

NATIONAL LEAGUE EAST

Braves
5: Freddie Freeman

He's still only 28 years old. The guy the Braves didn't trade years ago may end up being an Atlanta lifer … and perhaps someday a champion.

Marlins
27: Giancarlo Stanton

He's the Marlins' all-time leader in bWAR, by a significant margin. But by the time he retires, will anyone remember he ever played here?

Video: Stanton caps off historic 2017 with NL MVP Award

Mets
5: David Wright

Oh, what could have been.

Nationals
31: Max Scherzer

He's under contract with the Nationals through 2021, which gives him a lot of time to win some more Cy Young Awards.

Video: BOS@WSH: Scherzer records 1,000th K with Nationals

Phillies
26: Chase Utley

We've got five years to debate his Hall of Fame case. OK, probably 10, at least.

NL CENTRAL

Brewers
8: Ryan Braun

Is this crazy? This is probably crazy. But we might feel a lot differently about Braun's offense in 20 years than we do now.

Cardinals
5: Albert Pujols

Molina might end up having his jersey retired as well, but the Cardinals haven't given out No. 5 since Pujols left and surely won't ever again.

Video: WS2011 Gm3: Pujols' trio of homers ties Series record

Cubs
17: Kris Bryant

Incredibly tough call between Bryant and Anthony Rizzo here, but we'll go with the guy with the MVP Award and maybe some more coming.

Video: Bryant continues magical year with NL MVP Award

Pirates
22: Andrew McCutchen

Still pretty strange that his old team has a better record than his new one does.

Reds
19: Joey Votto

At this point, Votto will probably retire a Red, and maybe as the best Red since the Big Red Machine.

NL WEST

D-backs
44: Paul Goldschmidt

Goldschmidt might have gotten started too late in his career to have much of a shot at the Hall of Fame, but he'll be beloved in Phoenix forever.

Dodgers
22: Clayton Kershaw

We'll see what happens this offseason, but 11 years of brilliance so far is plenty.

Video: Kershaw sets Dodgers, MLB record with strikeout mark

Giants
28: Buster Posey

Barely edging out Madison Bumgarner, if just because Posey is less likely to ever play anywhere else.

Padres
23: Fernando Tatis Jr.

Heck, why not?

Rockies
28: Nolan Arenado

The question, as with many Rockies: How long will he remain a Rockie?

Video: Must C Cycle: Arenado gets cycle with walk-off homer

Will Leitch is a columnist for MLB.com.

Rays' nicknames for Players' Weekend

MLB.com @wwchastain

ST. PETERSBURG -- Players' Weekend is on the horizon, bringing about year two for one of Major League Baseball's initiatives to give fans an opportunity to know the players a little better.

"We were extraordinarily pleased that the first Players' Weekend gave fans greater insight into the players, their stories and their paths to the Major Leagues," said Commissioner Robert D. Manfred Jr. in a release from Major League Baseball. "By highlighting their positive influences, Players' Weekend showcased the significance of youth baseball and its role in the development of Major Leaguers. We look forward to the event returning and continuing to bring fans closer to the greatest baseball players in the world."

ST. PETERSBURG -- Players' Weekend is on the horizon, bringing about year two for one of Major League Baseball's initiatives to give fans an opportunity to know the players a little better.

"We were extraordinarily pleased that the first Players' Weekend gave fans greater insight into the players, their stories and their paths to the Major Leagues," said Commissioner Robert D. Manfred Jr. in a release from Major League Baseball. "By highlighting their positive influences, Players' Weekend showcased the significance of youth baseball and its role in the development of Major Leaguers. We look forward to the event returning and continuing to bring fans closer to the greatest baseball players in the world."

:: Players' Weekend presented by Valspar Stain ::

Thursday afternoon, Tampa Bay unveiled their Players' Weekend jerseys featuring nicknames that the Rays will wear when they host the Red Sox from Aug. 24-26. All Major League teams will participate in the colorful weekend.

"The Outlaw" is probably the most well-known nickname on the squad. And as any Rays fan with a pulse knows, the moniker belongs to Kevin Kiermaier and comes from the Rays center fielder's ability to rob hits from opposing teams.

Video: Get ready, 2018 Players' Weekend is August 24-26

Many of the nicknames for the players on the 25-man roster are self-explanatory, such as "Duffman" for Matt Duffy, and "JB" for Jake Bauers. Others need an explanation.

Shop for Players' Weekend gear
2018 Players' Weekend nicknames
Best nickname for every team
All you need to know about Players' Weekend

Sergio Romo is "El Mechon" -- a nickname that found him when he pitched for the Giants.

"It's pretty much from Mexico," Romo said. "I came out to the song 'El Mechon' at the end of 2011. I think it's pretty fitting. It means 'The Lock.' 'El Mechon' also means a highlight in your hair. And I've always had mohawks and long hair."

Carlos Gomez is "El Final", a moniker that comes from his where he hails in the Dominican Republic.

"Where I come from, Santiago, we use that a lot," Gomez said. "It's like, 'It's over.'"

Players will wear specially designed uniforms created for the three games with jerseys by Majestic, caps by New Era and socks from Stance.

"Players envisioned Players' Weekend as a way to express themselves and connect with fans in a fun and more personal way," MLBPA Executive Director Tony Clark said.

Game-worn Players' Weekend jerseys will be auctioned at MLB.com/auctions. All proceeds will be donated to the MLB-MLBPA Youth Development Foundation, a joint effort established in July 2015 by MLB and the MLBPA with an initial commitment of $30 million focused on improving the caliber, effectiveness and availability of amateur baseball and softball programs across the United States and Canada.

Here are the nicknames the Rays will wear on their backs while sporting colorful, non-traditional uniforms featuring alternate designs inspired by youth-league uniforms:

Willy Adames: "THE KID"
Jose Alvarado: "EL POCHO"
Jake Bauers: "JB"
Jalen Beeks: "BEEKER"
Diego Castillo: "SAMANA"
Yonny Chirinos: "YONITO"
Ji-Man Choi: "JI"
C.J. Cron: "BIG FELLA"
Jose De Leon: "PULPITO"
Matt Duffy: "DUFFMAN"
Jake Faria: "FUH-REE-UH"
Wilmer Font: "FONKY"
Tyler Glasnow: "MINI HORSE"
Carlos Gomez: "EL FINAL"
Kevin Kiermaier: "OUTLAW"
Adam Kolarek: "AK"
Vidal Nuno: "SLEEPY"
Michael Perez: "MYKII"
Tommy Pham: "PHAMTASTIC"
Daniel Robertson: "D-ROB"
Chaz Roe: "RANCH"
Sergio Romo: "EL MECHÓN"
Jaime Schultz: "SCHULTZY"
Mallex Smith: "M EFFECT"
Blake Snell: "ZILLA"
Ryne Stanek: "STANNY"
Jesus Sucre: "SOOKY"
Joey Wendle: "MENDLE"
Hunter Wood: "WOODY"
Ryan Yarbrough: "YARBITRON"

Bill Chastain has covered the Rays for MLB.com since 2005.

Tampa Bay Rays

Stanek, bullpen hold Blue Jays to 1 run in win

Romo shuts the door for 99th career save, 15th of year
MLB.com

TORONTO -- Lights-out pitching from a bullpen day coupled with heads-up baserunning lifted the Rays to a 3-1 victory over the Blue Jays at Rogers Centre on Saturday afternoon.

Since the All-Star break, Tampa Bay has been running wild, leading the Major Leagues with 19 stolen bases, but it's not just stealing bases that has troubled opposing teams. The Rays are also second in the American League over the last 30 days in Base Running (BsR), an all-encompassing baserunning statistic from Fangraphs that turns stolen bases, caught-stealing and other baserunning plays into a metric.

View Full Game Coverage

TORONTO -- Lights-out pitching from a bullpen day coupled with heads-up baserunning lifted the Rays to a 3-1 victory over the Blue Jays at Rogers Centre on Saturday afternoon.

Since the All-Star break, Tampa Bay has been running wild, leading the Major Leagues with 19 stolen bases, but it's not just stealing bases that has troubled opposing teams. The Rays are also second in the American League over the last 30 days in Base Running (BsR), an all-encompassing baserunning statistic from Fangraphs that turns stolen bases, caught-stealing and other baserunning plays into a metric.

View Full Game Coverage

"We're not a very high scoring offense, so we have to take advantage of any little mistake, bobble, whatever you want to call it, to get that extra 90 feet," Rays manager Kevin Cash said. "We preach to be aggressive and smart on the bases."

Mallex Smith showed off his blazing speed in the first inning when he turned a lazy ground ball with a 14 percent hit probability, according to Statcast™, into a leadoff double.

"Initially I thought I would beat out the ball and just get the single," Smith said. "But then I heard the crowd go, 'Ohhh.' So I thought they bobbled it. But then I saw it just helplessly rolling out to center field and I was like, 'Kevin isn't going to get to that ball before I get to second, so I'm going to take two.'"

Indecision from the Blue Jays' middle infielders allowed Smith to reach second standing up.

"Speed is very important, that's probably my carrying tool," Smith said. "Everything that I can do better makes the speed just that much more valuable."

He reached a top speed of 30.5 feet per second on the play, the average speed of Byron Buxton, the fastest player in the Majors according to Statcast™.

Matt Duffy followed with a ground ball to shortstop that likely would have been a double play had Smith stayed at first, but instead he advanced to third on the play. A batter later, Joey Wendle cashed him in with a ground-rule double to give the Rays an early 1-0 lead.

Video: TB@TOR: Wendle plates Smith with ground-rule double

An inning later, Kevin Kiermaier used his wheels to take second when Kevin Pillar bobbled the ball in center field just long enough to allow Kiermaier to slide safely into second.

"You just think it's a single, then you see him bobble it and it gets passed him, and whenever I see his numbers and turning around to go get the ball, I'm going to go," Kiermaier said.

He took third base during the next at-bat, and was cashed in by Willy Adames on a groundout to shortstop.

Video: TB@TOR: Kiermaier hustles home on Adames' groundout

"With our lineup and the guys we have, we have to execute the small things a lot more than other teams," Kiermaier said. "We don't have the big home run hitters and all that, we just try to move base to base anytime we can."

The "opener" strategy has worked for the Rays since adopting it on May 19 against the Los Angeles Angels. The Rays' bullpen has posted a 3.89 ERA in games started by openers and openers have a 2.65 ERA over their last 24 starts.

"I think it's been successful," Cash said. "It allows some of these young pitchers that were starters in Triple-A and are coming up through the system, to get a little deeper in the ballgame, and we can make a decision on that third time through the lineup, especially the top of the lineup for whatever opposing team we're facing."

Video: TB@TOR: Romo locks down his 99th career save

Ryne Stanek made his 19th start of the season for the Rays. He pitched 1 1/3 innings before giving way to the revolving door of bullpen arms. Diego Castillo went 2 2/3 innings and recorded the win. He was followed by Jaime Schultz, who went two innings, allowing the Blue Jays' lone run on a solo homer from Aledmys Diaz. Hunter Wood, Jose Alvarado and Sergio Romo closed out the game. Romo shut the door for his 99th career save and 15th of the year.

After a rocky first two innings for Blue Jays starter Sam Gaviglio, the 28-year-old settled down to finish the afternoon with seven strikeouts and one earned run over 5 1/3 innings. Tampa Bay couldn't get to Toronto's bullpen until the ninth, when Adames scored from second on a single from Jesus Sucre.

MOMENT THAT MATTERED
Castillo escapes jam: Stanek left the game in the second inning with one out, after giving up a leadoff double to Teoscar Hernandez and walking Kendrys Morales. Castillo came in and plunked Russell Martin, before falling behind 3-1 to Diaz, but Castillo got Diaz swinging on a low cutter then forced a popout to the catcher for the second out. He wrapped up the inning by getting Pillar to ground out to second to keep the Blue Jays off the board.

Video: TB@TOR: Castillo ends bases-loaded threat in the 2nd

SOUND SMART
Smith has hit .389 with a 1.093 OPS over 31 games since the start of July.

UP NEXT
Tyler Glasnow (1-2, 4.14 ERA) will make his third start for the Rays in the series finale against the Blue Jays on Sunday at 1:07 p.m. ET. Glasnow has combined to pitch just seven innings and 109 pitches in his first two starts, but he's posted 14 strikeouts and allowed just a pair of runs. Marcus Stroman (4-8, 5.20) takes the mound for Toronto.

Aaron Rose is a reporter for MLB.com based in Toronto.

Tampa Bay Rays

Snell pulled after 5 perfect frames in Rays' win

All-Star lefty K's six, throws 47 pitches; Perez hits first MLB home run
MLB.com

TORONTO -- Blake Snell was perfect in his second start since returning from the disabled list, but Rays manager Kevin Cash wouldn't let him go all the way.

The 25-year-old All-Star retired all 15 batters he faced until he was pulled after the fifth inning, but the Rays' offense put the game away with a 7-0 victory over the Blue Jays at Rogers Centre on Friday night.

View Full Game Coverage

TORONTO -- Blake Snell was perfect in his second start since returning from the disabled list, but Rays manager Kevin Cash wouldn't let him go all the way.

The 25-year-old All-Star retired all 15 batters he faced until he was pulled after the fifth inning, but the Rays' offense put the game away with a 7-0 victory over the Blue Jays at Rogers Centre on Friday night.

View Full Game Coverage

"His stuff is generally always pretty electric," Cash said. "But when he's throwing it over the plate and establishing all the pitches ... that's where he puts the hitters on such defense that you don't want to get deep in the count with him because his stuff is so good."

Cash had said prior to the game that he was planning to use Snell for five or six innings after the left-hander went four innings and threw 59 pitches against the White Sox in his return from the 10-day disabled list on Saturday. Prior to that start, Snell had been on the DL for two weeks with left shoulder fatigue.

After just 47 pitches, pitching coach Kyle Snyder decided it was time to get Snell out of the game.

"Cash said I was done, Kyle told me why and I'm not going to argue," Snell said. "Kyle wants what's best for my career, future-wise and everything. I felt great, yes, but I haven't gone five innings in a month, so to be able to do that and be as consistent as I wanted to with my pitches is something that I was very excited about."

Video: TB@TOR: Cash, Snell, Perez on Rays' 7-0 win vs. Jays

Snell confused Blue Jays batters and proved his command is back to elite form. He threw more than 70 percent of his pitches for strikes, striking out six batters and allowing just three balls out of the infield.

"He's one of the best young arms in the game," Blue Jays manager John Gibbons said. "He's just getting better and better. He has a great fastball and as good of a curveball as you're going to see in the game. … He was pretty impressive tonight."

Kendrys Morales looked like he might break up the perfect-game bid in the fifth inning when he hit a line drive off Snell's glove, but Willy Adames fielded the ball barehanded and threw out Morales at first.

Snell lowered his ERA to 2.18, moving ahead of Trevor Bauer for second place in the American League in ERA, trailing only Chris Sale (2.04). He's also now given up two or fewer runs in 18 starts this year, tying him for the AL lead with Justin Verlander.

"Overall, I'm happy with the fastball. I mean everything was really good today," Snell said. "The velocity on the curveball I was happy with. It had good bite with great arm speed. The fastball was jumping as well today."

Cash's decision to pull his starter made Snell just the fourth pitcher since 1920 to be yanked during a perfect-game bid of at least five innings, joining Rich Hill (Sept. 10, 2016), Daniel Norris (Sept. 22, 2015) and Bob Knepper (Oct. 5, 1986).

Jake Faria gave up the perfect game in the sixth inning, allowing Luke Maile to hit a leadoff infield single.

Video: TB@TOR: Maile singles in 6th to end Rays' perfecto

Blue Jays starter Marco Estrada kept the Rays' offense quiet for the first two innings, but he got into trouble in the third inning, surrendering a two-run homer and finishing the night with just 5 1/3 innings pitched and five runs allowed. Tampa Bay then got to the Blue Jays' bullpen, scoring a pair of runs off Thomas Pannone, who was pitching in his Major League debut.

Video: TB@TOR: Choi clubs a solo home run to right

MOMENTS THAT MATTERED
Michael Perez launched a curveball from Estrada over the right-field wall for his first career home run. The 26-year-old catcher knocked in Adames with the drive to give the Rays an early two-run lead in the third inning.

"I'm excited. I'm very happy," Perez said through a translator. "You're always eager to get that first one. I'm glad it came when it did."

Video: TB@TOR: Perez slugs a 2-run jack for 1st career HR

SOUND SMART
Adames doubled twice and singled in his first career three-hit game. He also drew a walk in the third inning. Adames has reached base safely in 12 of his last 13 games and has hit .326 over that span.

Video: TB@TOR: Adames doubles for his 3rd hit of the game

UP NEXT
The Rays will send Ryne Stanek (1-3, 2.56 ERA) to the mound to open Saturday's game against the Blue Jays with first pitch scheduled for 4:07 p.m. ET. He'll look to rebound after allowing back-to-back homers in a two-inning outing against the Orioles on Wednesday. Sam Gaviglio (2-4, 5.08) will start for the Blue Jays at Rogers Centre.

Aaron Rose is a reporter for MLB.com based in Toronto.

Tampa Bay Rays, Blake Snell

Myers spins a gem for Bowling Green

MLB.com @MannyOnMLB

Here's MLB Pipeline's roundup of the top prospect performances in the Minor Leagues on Friday.

What more can be said about Vladimir Guerrero Jr.? His torrid season continues, and his bat is doing plenty of talking. The 19-year-old Blue Jays prospect, ranked the No. 1 prospect in baseball, homered in his third straight game during Triple-A Buffalo's 5-4 victory over Toledo. He's hitting .433 (13-for-30) with two doubles and the trio of homers since his promotion from Double-A New Hampshire.

Here's MLB Pipeline's roundup of the top prospect performances in the Minor Leagues on Friday.

What more can be said about Vladimir Guerrero Jr.? His torrid season continues, and his bat is doing plenty of talking. The 19-year-old Blue Jays prospect, ranked the No. 1 prospect in baseball, homered in his third straight game during Triple-A Buffalo's 5-4 victory over Toledo. He's hitting .433 (13-for-30) with two doubles and the trio of homers since his promotion from Double-A New Hampshire.

Guerrero Jr. homers in third straight game

Guerrero, son of Hall of Fame outfielder Vladimir Guerrero, slashed .402/.449/.671 with 14 homers in 61 games for New Hampshire, and is continuing his rapid ascension toward the Majors.

:: Complete prospect coverage ::

Other top prospect performances from Friday's action:

Twins No. 2 prospect Alex Kirilloff, the No. 30 overall prospect in baseball, went 3-for-3 with a double and sacrifice fly in Class A Advanced Fort Myers' 6-4 victory over Florida. The 20-year-old right fielder is hitting .371/.394/.543 in 43 games since his promotion from Cedar Rapids, where he slashed .333/.391/.607 with 13 homers in 65 games.

White Sox No. 5 prospect Dylan Cease, the No. 44 prospect overall, gave up a run on two hits and struck out six over 5 2/3 innings during Double-A Birmingham's 18-2 rout of Montgomery. He did walk five batters, though he worked around his control issues to lower his ERA to 1.94 over eight starts since his promotion from Class A Advanced Winston-Salem, where he posted a 2.89 ERA over 13 starts.

In the same game, Chicago's No. 8 prospect, Zack Collins, capped a huge performance with two homers in the ninth inning, a solo shot and later a grand slam. Overall, the catcher was 3-for-6 with six RBIs, and is hitting .246 with 14 homers in 105 games.

Collins' grand slam

• A pair of Astros prospects starred for Class A Advanced Buies Creek as Seth Beer (No. 7) and J.J. Matijevic (No. 20) each homered in a 6-4 victory over Frederick.

Beer, whom the Astros selected 28th overall in this year's Draft, went 2-for-4 with his first homer at the Class A Advanced level, and is 9-for-34 (.265) since his promotion from Class A Quad Cities, where he posted a .934 OPS in 29 games.

Matijevic belted a two-run homer in the first inning for his 15th of the season. The left fielder has homered in four of his last five games and is hitting .261/.330/.510 in 69 games for Buies Creek this season.

• T.J. Zeuch, the Blue Jays' No. 16 prospect, tossed six scoreless innings in Double-A New Hampshire's 4-1 victory over Richmond. He yielded four hits, walking none and striking out five to lower his ERA to 3.12 in 17 starts for the Fisher Cats this season. Over his past two outings, the right-hander has turned in 12 scoreless frames.

Brewers No. 3 prospect Corey Ray continued his power surge at the plate with his third homer in five games during Double-A Biloxi's 3-2 win over Tennessee. The center fielder has hit 25 homers in 113 games for Biloxi this season, after hitting a career-high seven in 112 games for Class A Advanced Carolina in 2017.

Ray's 25th homer

• Michael Rucker, the Cubs' No. 13 prospect, threw six strong innings in Double-A Tennessee's 3-2 loss to Biloxi. He gave up a run on one hit, walking one and fanning four. He's yielded just three runs over his last three starts (1.59 ERA). Overall, he's posted a 3.12 ERA in 22 starts this season.

Mets prospects Franklyn Kilome (No. 5) and Adrian Hernandez (No. 14) turned in strong performances, with Kilome striking out 10 over 6 2/3 innings for Double-A Binghamton, and Hernandez going 3-for-4 with a homer -- his third in four games -- in the DSL.

Kilome gave up two runs on six hits, walking two in the 5-2 loss to Reading. In three starts for Binghamton, the right-hander has a 2.95 ERA. Prior to being traded from the Phillies in the deal that sent Asdrubal Cabrera to Philadelphia, Kilome had a 4.24 ERA in 19 starts for Reading.

Kilome's 10th strikeout

Rays No. 22 prospect Tobias Myers tossed seven scoreless frames in Class A Bowling Green's 2-0 loss to West Michigan. He gave up four hits, walked two and struck out six, and has a 0.96 ERA (three earned runs in 28 innings) over his last four starts. Overall, the 20-year-old right-hander owns a 3.50 ERA in 20 appearances (18 starts) this season.

• Twins No. 19 prospect Luke Raley went 3-for-5 with a triple, homer and three RBIs in Double-A Chattanooga's 8-2 victory over Jackson. The outfielder/first baseman is hitting .273/.349/.481 with 19 homers across two levels this season, including eight games at Double-A over which he's batting .250 (7-for-28) with a pair of homers.

Manny Randhawa is a reporter for MLB.com based in Denver. Follow him on Twitter at @MannyOnMLB.

Tampa beats Philly in Junior RBI World Series

MLB.com

MINNEAPOLIS -- For much of this season, Rays RBI Tampa relied on Dontavious Johnson on the mound, but hadn't necessarily needed his bat. On Friday, with his team in need of an offensive spark, Johnson came through in a big way at the plate and propelled a late rally as he and the Rays made program history.

Johnson's run-scoring triple in the bottom of the sixth set off a five-run outburst that helped Tampa top Philadelphia, 5-3, in dramatic fashion to win the Junior division title of the Reviving Baseball in Inner Cities (RBI) World Series at Siebert Field on the University of Minnesota campus.

MINNEAPOLIS -- For much of this season, Rays RBI Tampa relied on Dontavious Johnson on the mound, but hadn't necessarily needed his bat. On Friday, with his team in need of an offensive spark, Johnson came through in a big way at the plate and propelled a late rally as he and the Rays made program history.

Johnson's run-scoring triple in the bottom of the sixth set off a five-run outburst that helped Tampa top Philadelphia, 5-3, in dramatic fashion to win the Junior division title of the Reviving Baseball in Inner Cities (RBI) World Series at Siebert Field on the University of Minnesota campus.

Video: PHI@RAYS: Rays take the lead with a 5-run inning

While Tampa's program had found success at the RBI World Series in the past -- its senior squad won the title in 2001 -- '18 marked the first time its junior team (ages 13-15) had ever qualified for the tournament. After losing its opening game on Monday, Tampa bounced back and won five games in a row to finish off its title run.

"We never got down on ourselves," Johnson, who was named Championship Game MVP, said. "I've been playing with lots of these guys since I was little and we always knew we could do it."

Phillies RBI gradually built up a 3-0 lead over the first five innings and appeared to have control of the game as they ran wild on the bases. Cameron Simms scored on a double-steal for Philadelphia in the third inning to push its lead to 2-0. Then, Phillies RBI executed another double-steal in the fifth to set up Devon Koger's RBI groundout and make it 3-0.

Video: PHI@RAYS: Simms scampers home during a rundown

To that point, Philadelphia starter Steven Shaffer had been lights-out, allowing just one hit over the first five innings.

Video: PHI@RAYS: Shaffer tosses 5 2/3 strong innings

"I think we just had to straighten up [Shaffer's] breaking ball a little bit and start putting the ball in play," Tampa head coach Mark Whiten said. "I felt like if he was throwing that good, it was gonna be a long game. But we just kept plugging away."

In the sixth, Douglas Thompson drilled a leadoff single, and Johnson followed by crushing a triple to deep left field that gave Tampa its first run of the game.

Video: PHI@RAYS: Johnson laces an RBI triple to left

"Just when it started, man, the energy level went way up," Whiten said. "That's huge with these kids. They started having fun again. It wasn't fun for, like, four innings."

De'Mario Williams then drew a walk and stole second, and Trenton Bullen followed with another walk to load the bases.

Tyson Sutton drilled a sharp grounder to third that forced a Philadelphia throwing error at the plate, and Tampa cut its deficit to 3-2. Solomon Grayson then tied the game on a sacrifice fly, and Trarell Howard later came home on a wild pitch to score the go-ahead run.

Tre'Quan Davis crushed a run-scoring double that pushed Tampa's lead to 5-3 and completed the comeback.

Phillies RBI, which won the Junior division championship last season, finished the tournament 4-2. Much of last year's title-winning roster graduated to Philadelphia's Senior squad, and the Junior Phillies RBI team featured just three players who had played in the tournament last season.

"With a team this young, guys who are still early in their careers, it's hard to step up in that last inning knowing that you need two runs," Philadelphia head coach Devon Buchanan said. "I tip my hat to the Rays. They did what they needed to do."

For Tampa, the biggest dilemma is now deciding where the championship trophy will reside.

"I haven't decided that yet," Whiten laughed. "I might take it home for a little while and then pass it around -- maybe."

Jarrid Denney is a reporter for MLB.com based in Minneapolis.

Tampa Bay Rays, Philadelphia Phillies

Chirinos a sweet relief for Rays in 1st MLB win

Right-hander throws five innings of 1-run ball as Tampa Bay moves to one game above .500
MLB.com @wwchastain

ST. PETERSBURG -- Tampa Bay's "opener" struggled Thursday night. Fortunately for the Rays, their "follower" got the job done in a 5-4 win over Orioles at Tropicana Field.

Tampa Bay's win allowed the Rays to finish their homestand with a 5-4 mark, moving the team to 58-57 for the season.

View Full Game Coverage

ST. PETERSBURG -- Tampa Bay's "opener" struggled Thursday night. Fortunately for the Rays, their "follower" got the job done in a 5-4 win over Orioles at Tropicana Field.

Tampa Bay's win allowed the Rays to finish their homestand with a 5-4 mark, moving the team to 58-57 for the season.

View Full Game Coverage

Hunter Wood opened for the Rays and allowed three runs in the second to put the Rays in a 3-0 hole. Yonny Chirinos followed Wood, and the Rays' fortunes changed.

The rookie right-hander held the Orioles to one run on three hits while striking out four in five innings to earn his first Major League win.

"Probably a frustrating outing for Hunter," Rays manager Kevin Cash said. "Came out of the gate really letting it go, and they quickly made some adjustments against him. His two-strike location wasn't at its best, for whatever reason. After that … Yonny was outstanding. That's two back-to-back outings where he's been very efficient. Tempo's been outstanding."

Video: BAL@TB: Cash on bullpen, Lowe in win over Orioles

Chirinos had a tough outing at Baltimore on July 29, allowing three earned runs in three innings. He has since sped up his tempo, enjoying good results over the weekend against the White Sox, and then again against the Orioles on Thursday night.

"I was pitching real slow, the timing was off, the mechanics and everything there," Chirinos said through an interpreter. "But I made the adjustment since then, and I think it's benefited me."

First baseman Jake Bauers noted how Chirinos seemed to calm the Rays in the series finale.

"He came in and kept the tempo up," Bauers said. "Pumping strikes and obviously keeping us in the ballgame the whole way."

Bauers put the Rays up 5-4 with a two-run single in the seventh. Jose Alvarado then pitched a scoreless eighth and, a night after blowing a save, Sergio Romo pitched a scoreless ninth.

Video: BAL@TB: Romo strikes out Nunez to earn his 14th save

"We're taught to have short memories and forget the day before," Romo said. "You take bits and pieces from the day before, and you don't completely forget them. But more or less, you forget the outcome regardless of if it's good or not."

MOMENTS THAT MATTERED
Willy Adames singled to lead off the Rays' seventh before Mallex Smith and Matt Duffy drew consecutive two-out walks to load the bases for Bauers, who swung at the first pitch he saw from Cody Carroll, a 96-mph fastball. The rookie first baseman lined the ball into the right-center-field gap to score two, putting Tampa Bay ahead to stay.

Video: BAL@TB: Bauers ropes a go-ahead 2-run single in 7th

"I was just looking for something I could handle and hit a line drive," said Bauers, who drove in three runs Thursday night. "It would have been easy to kind of get jumpy and kind of jump at something. But I just tried to put a good swing on something and luckily got a line drive."

SOUND SMART
The Rays have played six consecutive one-run games for the second time in franchise history. They join the Mariners as the second team to do that this season. Tampa Bay's past six games have been decided in the seventh inning or later.

YOU GOTTA SEE THIS
Rookie second baseman Brandon Lowe made a diving backhanded stop of a Trey Mancini shot up the middle, and threw to first for the second out of the ninth.

Video: BAL@TB: Lowe robs Mancini with impressive diving stop

"He makes that play," Romo said. "That's a tip-of-the-cap moment."

HE SAID IT
"Maybe some young pitchers might have some hiccups, but Sergio doesn't think too much of it. He knows that if he makes his pitches, he is going to have success." -- Cash, on Romo nailing down the save

UP NEXT
Blake Snell (12-5, 2.27 ERA) will start Friday when the Rays open a three-game series against the Blue Jays at 7:07 p.m. ET at Rogers Centre in Toronto. Snell will make his second start since returning from the DL (left-shoulder fatigue), so he's still stretching himself out. He pitched four innings against the White Sox on Saturday, allowing one run on three hits and two walks. Right-hander Marco Estrada (5-8, 4.65) will start for the Blue Jays.

Bill Chastain has covered the Rays for MLB.com since 2004.

Tampa Bay Rays, Yonny Chirinos