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Jansen doing well after heart surgery

Closer promises to return 'stronger than ever' in Twitter video
November 26, 2018

LOS ANGELES -- Dodgers closer Kenley Jansen underwent corrective heart surgery on Monday and, in a video he posted on Twitter, promised he will be stronger than ever in 2019."Guys, I'm fine," Jansen said in the video. "The anesthesia is finally out of my system. I'm doing good. Enjoying the

LOS ANGELES -- Dodgers closer Kenley Jansen underwent corrective heart surgery on Monday and, in a video he posted on Twitter, promised he will be stronger than ever in 2019.
"Guys, I'm fine," Jansen said in the video. "The anesthesia is finally out of my system. I'm doing good. Enjoying the Christmas spirit. We'll see you guys soon in 2019, stronger than ever."

The club issued the following statement on Jansen's condition:
"Today, Dodger pitcher Kenley Jansen underwent an ablation procedure with Dr. Koonlawee Nademanee in Los Angeles. The procedure went as expected and Jansen is resting comfortably in the hospital. The club anticipates Jansen will be ready for Spring Training and available on Opening Day."
Jansen, 31, suffered an atrial fibrillation episode in August in Denver as a result of a heart condition that leaves him vulnerable to an irregular heartbeat at high altitude. He skipped a return trip against the Rockies in September after a cardiologist advised he would be at "high risk" of another incident.
After missing time in August, Jansen allowed seven runs in four innings in his first four appearances off the disabled list, but he settled in to post a 2.70 ERA in his final 14 regular-season appearances (13 1/3 innings). He pitched 6 2/3 scoreless frames in the National League Division Series and NL Championship Series, but he gave up two home runs and blew both of his save opportunities against the Red Sox in the World Series.
Jansen underwent a catheter ablation in the left atrium of his heart after the 2012 season to cauterize the damaged area and prevent it from generating abnormal electrical signals. He expected a similar procedure would be required this time with an estimated recovery of eight weeks, in time for the start of Spring Training.

Ken Gurnick has covered the Dodgers for MLB.com since 2001.