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Stroman placed on DL; Pannone recalled

Blue Jays option Santos, move Sanchez to 60-day DL
MLB.com @gregorMLB

NEW YORK -- The Blue Jays officially placed right-hander Marcus Stroman on the 10-day disabled list prior to Sunday's series finale against the Yankees.

Toronto also optioned right-hander Luis Santos to Triple-A Buffalo. As expected, the Blue Jays recalled lefty Thomas Pannone, and they also promoted right-hander Justin Shafer from Buffalo.

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NEW YORK -- The Blue Jays officially placed right-hander Marcus Stroman on the 10-day disabled list prior to Sunday's series finale against the Yankees.

Toronto also optioned right-hander Luis Santos to Triple-A Buffalo. As expected, the Blue Jays recalled lefty Thomas Pannone, and they also promoted right-hander Justin Shafer from Buffalo.

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The decision to place Stroman on the DL had been considered inevitable for the last couple of days. He was removed from Friday night's loss to the Yankees after four innings because of a blister issue on his right middle finger, marking his third consecutive start that was cut short by the injury.

"It has kind of been something I've prided myself on getting through, and I'm never one to bark about this being an issue, ever," Stroman said on Saturday. "I pride myself on being able to go out there and battle regardless of what I have going on, and I've gotten out there and I want to continue to go out there.

"I'm going to get through this, because that's who I am. But at this point right now I've just got to let it heal for a few days and kind of let that skin fully get back to being healthy."

Pannone is expected to take Stroman's spot in the starting rotation, and he is projected to start Wednesday against the Orioles. Shafer provides a fresh arm to the bullpen after Santos made appearances in back-to-back games on Friday and Saturday.

Video: TB@TOR: Pannone K's Kiermaier for 1st MLB strikeout

The 24-year-old Pannone made his Major League debut earlier this month. He made three appearances out of the bullpen and allowed two runs over three innings. He is ranked Toronto's No. 27 prospect, according to MLB Pipeline, and he was 0-3 with a 4.91 ERA in six starts for the Bisons this season.

Shafer made 32 appearances out of Buffalo's bullpen this year, posting a 2.45 ERA while striking out 29 and walking 16 over 36 2/3 innings.

The blister is another setback in what has become a frustrating 2018 campaign for Stroman. He missed approximately six weeks earlier this year because of a right shoulder injury. The product of Duke returned in late June, but after back-to-back seasons with at least 200 innings, he currently only has 100 2/3.

"Way more frustrating," Stroman admitted. "I [worked really hard] to be back this year, to get my shoulder right, and it's finally getting to the point where it feels great and to have this pop up, it sucks. It's something I have to deal with, it's something I'll get through. I usually channel and turn adversity into a positive, always, so I'll get through this.

Video: MIN@TOR: Santos strikes out Grossman to end the frame

"I know who I am as a pitcher, I know how dominant I'm going to be in this game for many, many years to come, and it's just a matter of getting this right. I'll get through it, and I'll come out stronger, like I always do."

To make room on the 40-man roster for Shafer, right-hander Aaron Sanchez was placed on the 60-day DL. Sanchez has been out since June 22 with a contusion on his right middle finger, and the move is simply procedural because he is technically eligible to return later this week. Sanchez is currently on a rehab assignment, but he is expected to need at least one more start before coming off the DL.

Gregor Chisholm has covered the Blue Jays for MLB.com since 2011. Follow him on Twitter @gregorMLB and Facebook, and listen to his podcast.

Toronto Blue Jays, Thomas Pannone, Luis Santos, Marcus Stroman

Blue Jays' rally falls short as rookie scuffles

MLB.com @gregorMLB

NEW YORK -- Sean Reid-Foley is not a finished product. He still has a long way to go before he can be considered a bona fide Major League pitcher, but with the Blue Jays an afterthought in the American League East, they have a unique opportunity to ride the highs and lows with one of their prized assets.

Reid-Foley was hit hard, early and often in an 11-6 loss to the Yankees on Saturday afternoon at Yankee Stadium. For a while, it looked like Reid-Foley might not even make it out of the second inning, but manager John Gibbons showed a lot of patience and seemed adamant about letting the 22-year-old righty work through his issues.

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NEW YORK -- Sean Reid-Foley is not a finished product. He still has a long way to go before he can be considered a bona fide Major League pitcher, but with the Blue Jays an afterthought in the American League East, they have a unique opportunity to ride the highs and lows with one of their prized assets.

Reid-Foley was hit hard, early and often in an 11-6 loss to the Yankees on Saturday afternoon at Yankee Stadium. For a while, it looked like Reid-Foley might not even make it out of the second inning, but manager John Gibbons showed a lot of patience and seemed adamant about letting the 22-year-old righty work through his issues.

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Video: TOR@NYY: Smoak rips an RBI single to right field

The final result wasn't pretty, as Reid-Foley allowed eight runs (six earned) on seven hits and three walks in a game that got out of hand quickly. But the outing also represented where the Blue Jays are headed. For the immediate future, Toronto isn't focused on wins and losses as much as it is on development. So despite the struggles, Reid-Foley was permitted to work through his issues in the hopes that it might pay off down the road.

"It was obviously frustrating, but I felt fine out there," Reid-Foley said after the second start of his career. "I just got behind in counts and threw balls that missed over the plate, and I obviously paid for them. They took advantage of my mistakes. Overall, I felt fine. I just have to move on and get ready for the next one now."

Video: TOR@NYY: Jansen singles through left side, scores one

New York scored two runs in the first, one in the second and two more in the third before Gibbons stepped out of the dugout and headed to the mound. Virtually everyone in the ballpark assumed that he was about to make a pitching change, but instead, Gibbons offered words of encouragement. He did all of the talking, as Reid-Foley listened and nodded, until home-plate umpire Hunter Wendelstedt broke up the meeting.

It was a rare move for Gibbons, who normally only goes to the mound when he's making a move for the bullpen. In the end, the talk didn't really change much. New York scored another run in the third, added one more in the fourth and another in the fifth before Reid-Foley was pulled from the game. He has now allowed 11 runs (nine earned) over 9 1/3 innings in his big league career.

Video: TOR@NYY: McKinney's single, error bring home 3 runs

"The only way you figure things out is to stay on the field and pitch," Gibbons said. "That was my intention. Plus, you can't [tire out] your 'pen either. Those guys have had a long year as well. But yeah, I think it's important, and it's only going to make him better."

Toronto's No. 10 prospect, according to MLB Pipeline, didn't receive much help from his defense, as both Devon Travis and Teoscar Hernandez could not complete a pair of makeable plays that led to two runs. Even so, Reid-Foley also gave up more than his fair share of hard contact, yielding home runs to Didi Gregorius, Giancarlo Stanton and Miguel Andujar. Reid-Foley also battled some control problems, recording a pair of wild pitches.

Video: TOR@NYY: Granderson doubles, advances on an error

The Blue Jays were trailing, 8-0, by the time Reid-Foley left the game, but Toronto battled back with a five-run sixth inning to make things interesting. Justin Smoak, Danny Jansen and Billy McKinney all had RBI singles, but Yankees right-hander Luis Severino still picked up the victory after he allowed two runs on six hits over five-plus innings of work. Smoak, Jansen, McKinney and veteran Curtis Granderson all finished with multiple hits. Kevin Pillar added an RBI double in the ninth.

"It definitely meant a lot," Reid-Foley said of being allowed to keep pitching despite the lopsided score. "I can definitely see that [Gibbons] is pulling for me. Everybody is pulling for me, letting me grind it out, and I was fortunate enough to work into the fifth inning after giving up [eight runs]. It was good."

Video: TOR@NYY: Pillar laces an RBI double to left-center

McKINNEY DEBUTS FOR BLUE JAYS
McKinney had a bit of a whirlwind afternoon while making his Blue Jays debut, in which he went 2-for-4 with a walk and two RBIs. He impressed in the top of the sixth inning with a single that cleared the bases, thanks to a throwing error from Neil Walker. The downside to the play, however, came on the basepaths, where McKinney was thrown out at third base. He was also picked off first base in the first.

The 23-year-old McKinney admitted after the game that he might have been trying to do too much in his first game for the Blue Jays. It was a combination of wanting to impress his new teammates, plus the added stress of facing his former team. Gibbons expects those jitters to be out of the way now that the debut is in his rearview mirror, and McKinney seems to expect the same.

Video: TOR@NYY: Severino catches McKinney leaning at first

"It was a lot of fun, it was a great experience," McKinney said. "Especially getting to play against some old teammates, but unfortunately we didn't get the win, and hopefully we'll get back out there tomorrow and get one. … I feel like I did all right. I felt comfortable and confident. I made a mistake on the bags and I have to make up for that, but other than that, I felt comfortable and felt like I did all right."

SOUND SMART
Jansen became the 11th player in Blue Jays franchise history to record at least one hit in each of his first four career games. Ryan Goins in 2013 was the last Toronto rookie to accomplish the feat, and Jansen is the only catcher on the list. Jansen finished 2-for-4 with an RBI double for the second multi-hit game of his career.

Video: TOR@NYY: Jansen laces his 1st big league double

UP NEXT
Left-hander Ryan Borucki (2-2, 3.29 ERA) will take the mound when the Blue Jays close out their three-game series against the Yankees on Sunday afternoon, with first pitch scheduled for 1:05 p.m. ET. Former Blue Jays pitcher J.A. Happ (13-6, 3.86 ERA) will get a chance to face his old team just a few weeks after he was traded to New York in exchange for Brandon Drury and McKinney. This will be Happ's first outing against Toronto since 2015.

Gregor Chisholm has covered the Blue Jays for MLB.com since 2011. Follow him on Twitter @gregorMLB and Facebook, and listen to his podcast.

Toronto Blue Jays, Danny Jansen, Billy McKinney, Justin Smoak

Longest home runs for every MLB team

Statcast measures farthest blast since 2015 for all 30 clubs
MLB.com

Ever since Babe Ruth launched Major League Baseball into the live-ball era with his awe-inspiring home runs, wowed fans have been asking: "How far did that ball go?"

Teams had their own methods for estimating home run distance for nearly a century. But now, the launch of Statcast™ has given us a whole new tool to answer the question, thanks to the tracking technology at every MLB ballpark.

Ever since Babe Ruth launched Major League Baseball into the live-ball era with his awe-inspiring home runs, wowed fans have been asking: "How far did that ball go?"

Teams had their own methods for estimating home run distance for nearly a century. But now, the launch of Statcast™ has given us a whole new tool to answer the question, thanks to the tracking technology at every MLB ballpark.

Here is a look at the longest homers hit by each of the 30 MLB clubs since Statcast™ began tracking home run distances at the start of the 2015 season.

American League East

Blue Jays: Josh Donaldson, April 23, 2015, vs. BAL; Sept. 17, 2017, at MIN
Distance: 481 feet (Watch them: HR No. 1; HR No. 2)
Both of these big flies were demolished. The first, with a 112.5-mph exit velocity, Donaldson launched into the second deck at the Rogers Centre. He hit the second even harder, at 113.5 mph, reaching the upper tank at Minnesota's Target Field. Full Blue Jays leaderboard

Orioles: Jonathan Schoop, Aug. 26, 2015, at KC
Distance: 484 feet (Watch it)
The Orioles have had their share of big sluggers in recent years, but it's Schoop who holds this title. One of baseball's best sluggers at second base, he jumped on this Johnny Cueto pitch that tailed in off the inside corner and kept it just fair down the left-field line at Kauffman Stadium. Full Orioles leaderboard

Rays: J.P. Arencibia, Sept. 7, 2015, at DET; C.J. Cron, Aug. 18, 2018, at BOS
Distance: 464 feet (Watch them: Arencibia's; Cron's)
Arencibia played only 24 games for Tampa Bay -- all in 2015, his final MLB season -- but he had no shortage of power. The opposing pitcher for this home run, the Tigers' Randy Wolf, was also in his final season. Nonetheless, they combined for an entry in the Rays' Statcast™ record book.

Arencibia got company when Cron showed off some light-tower power at Fenway Park in the dog days of August 2018. Cron crushed a 112.9 mph, 33-degree, 464-foot moonshot off David Price way over the Green Monster and over Lansdowne Street. Full Rays leaderboard

Red Sox: Hanley Ramirez, April 29, 2017, vs. CHC
Distance: 469 feet (Watch it)
Before this, Ramirez was tied with David Ortiz for the longest Red Sox homer, at 468 feet. But here, facing former Boston hurler John Lackey at Fenway Park, he took that honor all for himself. Ramirez drilled a center-cut two-seamer way over the Green Monster for a monstrous solo shot. Full Red Sox leaderboard

Yankees: Aaron Judge, June 11, 2017, vs. BAL
Distance: 495 feet (Watch it)
Judge became a sensation in 2017 because of feats like this one. The AL Rookie of the Year cleared the left-field bleachers at Yankee Stadium with a 118.6 mph, 495-foot homer. It was the longest homer of 2017 and tied Judge for the second-longest big fly in Statcast™ history. Full Yankees leaderboard

AL Central

Indians: Mike Napoli, Sept. 9, 2016 vs. MIN
Distance: 463 feet (Watch it)
The Party at Napoli's reached the highest deck at Target Field on this September night, as this blast helped the first baseman reach a career-high 93 RBIs on the season. Napoli had also hit a 464-foot ball in foul territory the night before at Progressive Field.

"That's good for bragging rights," Napoli's teammate, Rajai Davis, told MLB.com. "That's an awesome, great feeling. I don't think I've ever hit the ball that far in batting practice. He's doing it in games. That's awesome. We can all admire that." Full Indians leaderboard

Royals: Brandon Moss, July 1, 2017, vs. MIN
Distance: 477 feet (Watch it)
Moss left his mark during his lone season in Kansas City, golfing this pitch to help spur a four-run comeback for the home side against the rival Twins. Moss would retire the following spring, but his power clearly remained in his bat until the end. Full Royals leaderboard

Tigers: J.D. Martinez, July 21, 2015, vs. SEA
Distance: 467 feet (Watch it)
Not to be outdone by Nelson Cruz's 455-foot shot in the top half of the third inning, Martinez one-upped Seattle's slugger in the bottom half with this impressive blast to straightaway center at cavernous Comerica Park. The dinger impressed just about everyone in the ballpark, except perhaps the slugger who hit it.

"It all means the same to me," Martinez told MLB.com about his big fly. "I don't care. People get caught up on [distance]. To me, I really pay no mind. I just hit it, and I just hope it gets out." Full Tigers leaderboard

Twins: Kennys Vargas, June 20, 2017, vs. CWS
Distance: 483 feet (Watch it)
There really wasn't any doubt about this homer as soon as Vargas' bat met this pitch from White Sox starter Derek Holland with a scorching 114.1-mph exit velocity. Vargas' shot climbed high above the bullpen in left-center at Target Field for one of four 450-plus foot homers the first baseman hit in less than 800 at-bats in a Twins uniform. Full Twins leaderboard

Video: CWS@MIN: Vargas crushes a 483-foot home run

White Sox: Avisail Garcia, April 3, 2018, vs. TOR
Distance: 481 feet (Watch it)
Garcia was coming off a terrific 2017 campaign in which he finished second in the AL batting race with a .330 average, but he showed he could be much more than a slap hitter with this prodigious blast at Rogers Centre. Blue Jays starter J.A. Happ's slider caught too much of the plate, and Garcia punished it with a blistering 116.7-mph exit velocity.

"It was a pretty impressive blast, just from standing in the dugout and watching it," White Sox manager Rick Renteria told MLB.com. "Anybody who is a fan of baseball must have been impressed by that shot." Full White Sox leaderboard

AL West

Angels: Mike Trout, July 8, 2015, vs. COL
Distance: 477 feet (Watch it)
Trout's second homer of the night travelled deep to straightaway center field, landing halfway up the bleachers at Coors Field. Better yet, Trout's solo blast tied the ballgame and led to an eventual 3-2 win for the Angels. Full Angels leaderboard

Astros: George Springer, May 31, 2017, vs. MIN
Distance: 473 feet (Watch it)
Springer's blast capped a two-homer day against the Twins, part of a massive series for the eventual World Series champions in which they set a franchise record for runs scored in a three-game series.

"That's all I've got," Springer said of the homer. "That's about all I can hit it." Full Astros leaderboard

Athletics: Matt Olson, Sept. 15, 2017, vs. PHI
Distance: 483 feet (Watch it)
Olson's sky-high blast at Citizens Bank Park came at the peak of an incredibly powerful rookie season in which he crushed 24 homers in just 189 at-bats for Oakland. Phillies starter Mark Leiter Jr. knew he was in trouble as soon as Olson connected; all there was left to do was wait and see where the slugger's blast would eventually land. Full A's leaderboard

Mariners: Nelson Cruz, Sept. 24, 2016, vs. MIN
Distance: 493 feet (Watch it)
Few players in the game can crush a baseball like Cruz, and the Boomstick found the third deck at Target Field with this neck-craning blast. Cruz's shot remains among the longest homer hit outside the thin air of Coors Field, and it came one night after he had launched a different 454-foot homer for Seattle. Full Mariners leaderboard

Video: SEA@MIN: Cruz crushes 493-ft homer

Rangers: Nomar Mazara, May 25, 2016, vs. LAA
Distance: 491 feet (Watch it)
The rookie Mazara raised his profile substantially with this towering drive to the upper deck at Globe Life Park, turning on and punishing an offspeed pitch from Angels starter Hector Santiago.

"That was loud," said Rangers catcher Bobby Wilson of Mazara's dinger. "You need earplugs for that one." Full Rangers leaderboard

National League East

Braves: Freddie Freeman, June 13, 2015, vs. NYM
Distance: 464 feet (Watch it)
Atlanta's most consistent slugger got a hold of this first-inning fastball from Mets ace Jacob deGrom, pulling it high and deep onto the right-center-field bridge at Citi Field. Full Braves leaderboard

Marlins: Giancarlo Stanton, Aug. 6, 2016, vs. COL
Distance: 504 feet (Watch it)
This is it -- the longest home run since Statcast™ started tracking in 2015, and the only one projected at more than 500 feet. The 504-foot distance may have been aided by the thin air at Coors Field, but Stanton has shown plenty of times that he doesn't need any help to clear the fence. Full Marlins leaderboard

Video: Must C Crushed: Stanton connects on 504-foot home run

Mets: Yoenis Cespedes, April 24, 2018 vs. STL
Distance: 463 feet (Watch it)
Cespedes was off to a tough start to the 2018 season, batting .195 with an MLB-most 37 strikeouts entering this Tuesday night matchup in St. Louis. But with a pair of runners on in the fifth, New York's big slugger proved his power was still very much intact. Cespedes tied up the Cardinals with this moonshot that landed next to the "Big Mac Land" seating section in left field, surpassing Justin Ruggiano's 461-foot homer from Aug. 23, 2016, which also came at Busch Stadium. Full Mets leaderboard

Nationals: Michael A. Taylor, Aug. 20, 2015, vs. COL
Distance: 493 feet (Watch it)
Rockies starter Yohan Flande was cruising against the Nationals until Taylor gave his club a humongous game-tying lift on this blast to left-center. Taylor's dinger may have received an assist from the friendly Coors Field environment, but his 110.1-mph exit velocity was no joke. Taylor's ideal 26-degree launch angle also helped this ball go a long way. Full Nationals leaderboard

Phillies: Maikel Franco, July 10, 2016, vs. COL
Distance: 471 feet (Watch it)
Rockies reliever Jason Motte attempted to go up and in on Franco with a fastball, but the Phillies third baseman was ready for the challenge. Franco turned quickly on the pitch, pulling it into the high altitude at Coors Field for a long line-drive homer. Full Phillies leaderboard

NL Central

Brewers: Domingo Santana, July 26, 2017, vs. WSH
Distance: 476 feet (Watch it)
Nationals Park has housed plenty of its own sluggers, from Bryce Harper to Anthony Rendon to Ryan Zimmerman. But it was the visiting Santana who etched his name atop the ballpark's list of longest home runs on this summer evening. Santana turned on an inside fastball from Gio Gonzalez and crushed it over the visitors' bullpen, high into the left-field concourse. Full Brewers leaderboard

Cardinals: Marcell Ozuna, April 3, 2018, vs. MIL
Distance: 479 feet (Watch it)
Ozuna's first Cardinals home run also established him atop his new team's home run distance leaderboard. Facing Brewers starter Chase Anderson, Ozuna connected with a 117.2-mph exit velocity and sent Anderson's offering deep to left-center -- also setting a new Statcast™ mark for the longest homer at Miller Park. Full Cardinals leaderboard

Cubs: Kris Bryant, Sept. 6, 2015, vs. ARI
Distance: 495 feet (Watch it)
Wrigley Field can become a launching pad when the wind blows out toward the bleachers, but even as a rookie, Bryant proved he didn't need much help launching prolific blasts. This one bounced off the new scoreboard in left field -- fittingly right next to Bryant's own picture -- to further build Bryant's prestige with the North Siders. Full Cubs leaderboard

Video: ARI@CHC: Statcast™ on Bryant's blast off scoreboard

Pirates: Pedro Alvarez, Oct. 4, 2015, vs. CIN
Distance: 479 feet (Watch it)
Pittsburgh's hulking slugger decided the right-field seats at PNC Park weren't enough on the final day of the 2015 regular season, instead clearing the bleachers completely and depositing this ball into the Allegheny River. Alvarez simply demolished the pitch, connecting with a 115.4-mph exit velocity and uppercutting with an ideal 29-degree launch angle. Full Pirates leaderboard

Reds: Eugenio Suarez, June 2, 2016, vs. COL
Distance: 465 feet (Watch it)
Listed at just 5-foot-11 and 213 pounds, Suarez struck a blow for undersized infielders with this massive shot to left-center at Coors Field. This was actually Suarez's second homer of the game, capping an impressive evening for the third baseman. Full Reds leaderboard

NL West

D-backs: Jake Lamb, April 29, 2017, vs. COL
Distance: 481 feet (Watch it)
In the days before the humidor, balls flew out of Chase Field. What's surprising about Lamb's blast isn't where it was hit, but the opposing pitcher he victimized. The Rockies' Tyler Anderson is a left-hander, and southpaws overall had been extremely effective against Lamb. But in this at-bat, the platoon disadvantage didn't bother Lamb at all. Full D-backs leaderboard

Dodgers: Joc Pederson, June 2, 2015, at COL
Distance: 477 feet (Watch it)
Considering the Rockies are in their division, it's no surprise that the Dodgers hit their longest homer at Coors Field: a majestic blast by Pederson way up into the center-field bleachers. It came in a series in which Pederson crushed four home runs -- one in each game. Full Dodgers leaderboard

Giants: Brandon Belt, May 22, 2015, at COL
Distance: 475 feet (Watch it)
Another NL West club, another entry from the friendly environment of Coors Field. Belt jumped on a hanging changeup and launched it far into the third deck in right field. This type of blast has been a rarity for the Giants, who hit the second-fewest homers of 420-plus feet (74) from 2015-17, ahead of only the Braves. Full Giants leaderboard

Padres: Franchy Cordero, April 20, 2018 at ARI
Distance: 489 feet (Watch it)
Franchy absolutely crushed this one. The D-backs' Matt Koch grooved Cordero a fastball, and Cordero hammered it 116.3 mph all the way up the scoreboard in dead center at Chase Field, instantly establishing a new longest home run of the 2018 season and a Padres Statcast™ record. He obliterated the team's previous best of 465 feet, which had been set by Melvin Upton Jr. in June of 2016. Cordero's blast is also the longest hit at Chase Field since Statcast™'s introduction in 2015, and the 10th-longest hit by anyone in baseball since 2015. Full Padres leaderboard

Video: SD@ARI: Cordero crushes 489-ft. HR at 116.3 mph

Rockies: Mark Reynolds, July 21, 2016, vs. ATL
Distance: 484 feet (Watch it)
Yes, the Rockies' longest home run came at home. Reynolds, the powerful veteran, got ahead in the count 2-0 against a rookie left-hander, Hunter Cervenka, who fired a fastball over the middle of the plate. Reynolds demolished it at 108.8 mph, sending a drive most of the way up the bleachers beyond the left-center-field wall. Full Rockies leaderboard

David Adler is a reporter for MLB.com based in New York. Follow him on Twitter at @_dadler.

Matt Kelly is a reporter for MLB.com based in New York. Follow him on Twitter at @mattkellyMLB.

Andrew Simon is a research analyst for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter at @AndrewSimonMLB.

Tracking Vlad Jr.'s quest for a .400 season

No. 1 prospect in baseball chases feat not achieved in 57 years
MLB.com @MannyOnMLB

As we anticipate the Major League arrival of 19-year-old phenom Vladimir Guerrero Jr., let's not allow that anticipation to mask what could be a historic Minor League campaign. Guerrero is chasing a feat that hasn't been accomplished at any level of professional baseball in 57 years: a .400 batting average over a full season.

As we anticipate the Major League arrival of 19-year-old phenom Vladimir Guerrero Jr., let's not allow that anticipation to mask what could be a historic Minor League campaign. Guerrero is chasing a feat that hasn't been accomplished at any level of professional baseball in 57 years: a .400 batting average over a full season.

:: Complete prospect coverage ::

Guerrero, baseball's No. 1 prospect per MLB Pipeline, has played at four levels within the Blue Jays' system in 2018, and he is hitting .393 with 18 home runs in 80 games. In 61 games for Double-A New Hampshire, he slashed .402/.449/.671 with 14 homers, and since being promoted to Triple-A Buffalo, he's batting .345 with four homers, all coming in four consecutive games.

Guerrero's high-water mark for the season came on May 25, when he was batting .438. He was hitting .410 on June 6 before missing about five weeks due to a left knee injury. 

The last player to hit .400 or better over a full season, excluding short-season leagues, was the Cubs' Aaron Pointer in 1961. The brother of members of the Pointer Sisters singing group hit .401 in 97 games between Triple-A (four) and Class D (93).

Erubiel Durazo hit .404 between Double-A El Paso and Triple-A Tucson in 1999, but he was promoted to the D-backs in July and didn't hit .400 over the course of the full season, including his big league stats. And Gary Redus hit an MiLB record .462 during his professional debut for Billings in 1978, but that was in the short-season Pioneer League.

Watch: Vlad Jr. homers in 4th straight game

Here's a look at Guerrero's run at a .400 season since he was promoted to Triple-A Buffalo on July 31, at which point he was hitting .401:

Saturday, Aug. 18: Did not play at Gwinnett
Average: .391
Vlad Jr. had a scheduled day off, the first game he hasn't started for Buffalo since the second game of a doubleheader on July 1.

Friday, Aug. 17: 1-for-4 at Gwinnett
Average: .391
Guerrero salvaged the night with a base hit in the top of the ninth. After going 0-for-3 to begin the game, Guerrero did at least get a hit, but his average dipped two points further from .400.

Thursday, Aug. 16: 2-for-3 at Gwinnett
Average: .393
Guerrero got a base hit in his first at-bat to end a 1-for-15 skid and went 2-for-3 for his first multihit effort since Aug. 11. He also avoided going consecutive games without a hit -- something he hasn't done in over two years.

Wednesday, Aug. 15: 0-for-5 at Charlotte
Average: .390
Hitless for the fifth time in 14 games with Buffalo, Guerrero saw his average drop to its lowest point since it was .388 on April 30. His 0-for-5 performance was his first in over two years.

Tuesday, Aug. 14: 1-for-5 at Charlotte
Average: .397
Guerrero singled in the third, but that was all he managed on a day that seemed to be friendly to hitters as Buffalo finished with 14 runs on 18 hits.

Sunday, Aug. 12: 0-for-4 vs. Toledo
Average: .400

Guerrero not only saw his streak of four straight games with a homer come to an end, but he went hitless for the fourth time in 12 games with Buffalo after going hitless four times in his previous 52 games.

Saturday, Aug. 11: 2-for-4 vs. Toledo
Average: .406

Guerrero homered in his fourth straight game on, of all nights, Superhero Night at Coca-Cola Field. This one was an opposite-field solo shot in the fourth inning.

Friday, Aug. 10: 1-for-4 vs. Toledo
Average: .406

Though he was only 1-for-4 on this night, Guerrero made his one hit count, launching a solo homer in the first inning during Buffalo's 5-4 victory over Toledo.

Thursday, Aug. 9: 2-for-4 vs. Gwinnett
Average: .407

Guerrero belted a solo homer in the sixth inning, and then singled in the eighth during Buffalo's 9-5 loss to Gwinnett.

Wednesday, Aug. 8: 3-for-4 vs. Gwinnett
Average: .405

With a first-inning double, a third-inning single and a two-run homer in the fifth, Guerrero finished a triple shy of the cycle in Buffalo's 6-1 win over Gwinnett.

Tuesday, Aug. 7: 3-for-4 vs. Gwinnett
Average: .400

Guerrero singled three times in Buffalo's 2-0 loss, beginning a five-game stretch over which he would go 11-for-20 and raise his season batting average from .395 to .406.

Sunday, Aug. 5: 0-for-3 at Scranton/Wilkes-Barre
Average: .395

Guerrero went 0-for-3 at Scranton/Wilkes-Barre in a 6-5 victory, his third hitless game out of the first six games in his Triple-A career.

Saturday, Aug. 4: 2-for-2 at Scranton/Wilkes-Barre
Average: .399

With a walk in the first inning, an RBI single in the third, a walk in the fourth, and another single in the seventh, Guerrero tacked on four points to his average to get it back to the cusp of .400.

Saturday, Aug. 4: 0-for-2 at Scranton/Wilkes-Barre
Average: .395

Though he walked in the sixth inning of a 3-1 loss during the first game of a doubleheader, Guerrero was hitless for the second time in his first four Triple-A games.

Thursday, Aug. 2: 1-for-3 vs. Lehigh Valley
Average: .398

Guerrero went 1-for-3 with a first-inning double and a fifth-inning walk in Buffalo's 6-4 loss to Lehigh Valley.

Wednesday, Aug. 1: 1-for-3 vs. Lehigh Valley
Average: .398

Following a pair of strikeouts, Guerrero picked up his first Triple-A hit with a line-drive single to left field in a 1-0 loss.

Tuesday, July 31: 0-for-1 vs. Lehigh Valley
Average: .399

Guerrero walked in his first three Triple-A plate appearances, then hit a sacrifice fly in the sixth inning to drive in his first Triple-A run before grounding out in the eighth inning of the 11-8 loss. His average dropped below .400 for the first time since May 13.

Manny Randhawa is a reporter for MLB.com based in Denver. Follow him on Twitter at @MannyOnMLB.

Toronto Blue Jays

GM: Gibbons will finish '18 as Blue Jays skipper

Club, manager will discuss future at the end of season
MLB.com @gregorMLB

NEW YORK -- John Gibbons will finish out the season as Blue Jays manager and then his future with the organization will be revisited, according to general manger Ross Atkins.

A report from Sportsnet's Jeff Blair earlier this month referenced "chatter" about how Gibbons was possibly embarking on his final homestand as manager. The dismissal never happened, but a couple of days later, MLB Network's Ken Rosenthal reported that the Blue Jays "seemed destined" to fire Gibbons at the end of the year.

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NEW YORK -- John Gibbons will finish out the season as Blue Jays manager and then his future with the organization will be revisited, according to general manger Ross Atkins.

A report from Sportsnet's Jeff Blair earlier this month referenced "chatter" about how Gibbons was possibly embarking on his final homestand as manager. The dismissal never happened, but a couple of days later, MLB Network's Ken Rosenthal reported that the Blue Jays "seemed destined" to fire Gibbons at the end of the year.

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The media reports prompted Atkins to sit down with Gibbons in an attempt to clear the air. Gibbons, who is under contract through 2019, hasn't received any guarantees about returning next year, but Atkins is adamant that no decision will be made before the end of the regular season.

"We were always having those discussions. We're constantly having discussions about how we can get better, how we can improve, and he's always a part of those," Atkins said when asked whether he needed to sit down with Gibbons because of the speculation.

"Those rumors, that's what they ended up being, we did have to have discussions about them, that's just the nature of working with human beings, but ultimately our discussions were around the same things they're always about. How can we get better? How can we improve? Decided we certainly want to continue this year together and we'll revisit at the end of the year what that means for next year."

Gibbons is in the midst of his second tenure as Toronto's manager. The native of San Antonio took over as manager in 2004 when Carlos Tosca was fired, and Gibbons remained in place until 2008. He was brought back by former Blue Jays GM Alex Anthopoulos prior to the 2013 and has been in charge ever since, despite wholesale changes to the organization's front office.

The 56-year-old Gibbons entered play on Friday with a 755-766 record as Toronto's manager. Cito Gaston, who also had two stints with the Blue Jays, is the only manager with more wins in franchise history (894).

"When it becomes a distraction, it certainly is less than ideal," Atkins said when asked whether he was bothered by the constant speculation surrounding Gibbons' job status. "This game is about players. It's about fans. It's not about Gibby. It's not about me. Never will be, it's always going to be about the players, and so as soon as we can get the focus back on the field and on Ryan Borucki, Dan Jansen, Kevin Pillar and Justin Smoak the better."

Gregor Chisholm has covered the Blue Jays for MLB.com since 2011. Follow him on Twitter @gregorMLB and Facebook, and listen to his podcast.

Toronto Blue Jays

Happ emotional about facing former teammates

Blue Jays will take on left-hander Sunday at Yankee Stadium
MLB.com @gregorMLB

NEW YORK -- J.A. Happ tried as best he could to avoid the rumors that marred his final weeks in a Blue Jays uniform. Despite his best efforts, that proved to be almost impossible.

Text messages from friends, interview requests from both sides of the border, people seeing him out in the community, there were reminders everywhere. Even for a guy who tried to isolate himself from the outside baseball world was presented with the reality of his situation on a daily basis. He couldn't avoid it.

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NEW YORK -- J.A. Happ tried as best he could to avoid the rumors that marred his final weeks in a Blue Jays uniform. Despite his best efforts, that proved to be almost impossible.

Text messages from friends, interview requests from both sides of the border, people seeing him out in the community, there were reminders everywhere. Even for a guy who tried to isolate himself from the outside baseball world was presented with the reality of his situation on a daily basis. He couldn't avoid it.

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That's why, more than any other reason, Happ could not help but feel a sense of relief when the Blue Jays finally traded him to the Yankees on July 26 for infielder Brandon Drury and outfielder Billy McKinney. This wasn't necessarily how Happ envisioned his time in Toronto coming to an end, but once it became inevitable, Happ embraced the end of the long, drawn-out process.

"I think there was a little bit," Happ said when asked whether he felt a sense of relief when the trade became official. "If I had to guess, I thought that I would probably go somewhere. I just didn't know where it was going to be.

"The questions, as you get closer, they keep coming and keep coming. You just get used to saying the same thing, 'We'll wait and see.' We finally saw, and then you try to move forward and try to take advantage of the opportunity you have, and that's kind of my goal now."

Two days after the deal was announced, Happ bid an emotional farewell to the fans by releasing a lengthy letter on the Blue Jays' social-media platforms. The decision to reach out to the fan base was his, and his alone, and it came as a spur-of-the-moment feeling when Happ was traveling to meet his new teammates.

Tweet from @BlueJays: A special message from J.A. Happ. pic.twitter.com/rB56wwD1Z3

Among the things Happ wrote in that letter was that one of his goals when he signed before the 2016 season was to "win over the Blue Jays fans. I would like to think I did, but I know for sure that they made me fall in love with them much more."

It was a classy tribute and one that he said was motivated by all of the text messages and notes he was receiving from the Blue Jays family who were wishing him the best of luck in pinstripes and thanking him for all of the memories in Toronto.

"I had some time on the plane, and I was just thinking about all the messages I was getting and seeing some messages that people left and wrote and I felt like I needed to say something to show my appreciation," Happ said. "So I wrote that on my phone, just some stuff from the heart about how I felt. I wanted to let the fans and the organization know."

As for the new Yankees surroundings, Happ admitted that he is excited about joining a contending team and getting back to the postseason for the first time in a couple of years. In 2009, he saw firsthand what it was like to experience Yankee Stadium in October when the Phillies and Yankees squared off in the World Series, and he's hoping for a similar experience while playing for one of his former divisional rivals.

Before any of that can happen, though, Happ will first have to face his former teammates when he takes the mound on Sunday afternoon at Yankee Stadium.

"I think it will be, to an extent," Happ said when asked whether it will be a weird or awkward experience. "I spent a lot of time [there] and have a lot of respect for those guys and I feel like I have some good friendships over there.

"That part is always a little strange, especially so soon. It's only been a couple of weeks. Hopefully it will be one of those things where the anxiety will be there before the game, and once you start getting into it you're just competing."

Maile to paternity list
Blue Jays catcher Luke Maile was placed on the paternity list on Friday afternoon. McKinney was recalled from Triple-A Buffalo to take his spot on the 25-man roster.

The short-term departure of Maile means that Russell Martin will return to his traditional catching position while splitting time with recently called-up rookie Danny Jansen. Martin played third base during Toronto's recent four-game series vs. Kansas City as Maile and Jansen split time behind the plate.

"He'll be in there tomorrow," Blue Jays manager John Gibbons said in reference to starting McKinney somewhere in the outfield for the second game of this series.

Tweet from @BlueJays: Familiar surroundings, fresh blue threads. Welcome to the #BlueJays, @billy_mckinney! pic.twitter.com/kMjKvNVgjC

Gregor Chisholm has covered the Blue Jays for MLB.com since 2011. Follow him on Twitter @gregorMLB and Facebook, and listen to his podcast.

Toronto Blue Jays, J.A. Happ

See the Blue Jays Players' Weekend nicknames

MLB.com @gregorMLB

For the second consecutive year, Major Leaguers will put their personalities and passions on the field when Players' Weekend takes center stage during all games from Friday, Aug. 24, through Sunday, Aug. 26.

Here are the nicknames the Blue Jays will wear on their backs while sporting colorful, non-traditional uniforms featuring alternate designs inspired by youth-league uniforms:

For the second consecutive year, Major Leaguers will put their personalities and passions on the field when Players' Weekend takes center stage during all games from Friday, Aug. 24, through Sunday, Aug. 26.

Here are the nicknames the Blue Jays will wear on their backs while sporting colorful, non-traditional uniforms featuring alternate designs inspired by youth-league uniforms:

:: Players' Weekend presented by Valspar Stain ::

Shop for Players' Weekend gear
2018 Players' Weekend nicknames
Best nickname for every team
All you need to know about Players' Weekend

Danny Barnes: "BARNZY"

Barnes will use a variation of his last name but jokes he wishes he had thought to use former teammate Darwin Barney's last name instead.

Joe Biagini: "JOE THE GREAT"

"I would say that I am somewhat of a 'Seinfeld' aficionado," Biagini said. "And in 'Seinfeld' is featured an episode where Jerry demands to be called 'Jerry the Great,' I think it's the one where Elaine is dating the maestro and he prefers to be called that. So first of all, 'Joe the Great' because it is a given, second of all, because I appreciate the greatest show ever made and I wanted to honor it in such a way that only I and probably everyone else could."

Video: Get ready, 2018 Players' Weekend is August 24-26

Ryan Borucki: "BORUCKI"
Tyler Clippard: "CLIP"
Aledmys Diaz: "PAPITO"

"I never had a nickname when I was younger," Diaz said through an interpreter. "I call my son 'Papito,' so for me this weekend is like a family week, and I want this name to mean something to me, so I put 'Papito' because that's how I call my son."

Josh Donaldson: "BRINGER OF RAIN"

Donaldson has said that his nickname was lifted from the TV show "Spartacus: Blood and Sand," in which the gladiator Spartacus defeats a daunting foe in the arena and rain falls on a nation in drought immediately after. Donaldson liked the story and swiped the nickname for his Twitter handle.

Brandon Drury: "DRU"
Marco Estrada: "ESTRATOSPHERE"

"I think fans have said it before and somehow it got back to me," Estrada said. "I kind of liked the way it sounded, so I said I'm going to try it this year."

Jaime Garcia: "JAIMITO"
Sam Gaviglio: "GAVIGLIO"
Ken Giles: "100 MILES GILES"

Giles' name comes from his high-velocity fastball that he uses over 50 percent of the time.

Lourdes Gurriel Jr.: "YUNITO"

The name comes from his older brother, Yuli Gurriel, and means "little brother" or "little Yuni."

Curtis Granderson: "GRANDYMAN"
Randal Grichuk: "GRICH"
Teoscar Hernandez: "OCA"
Luke Maile: "LUKEY BARRELS"

"It was given to me by [Kevin] Pillar earlier in Spring Training," Maile said. "He told me that we lost 'Joey Bats,' but we gained Lukey Barrels. ... So I went ahead and took it, but some of the guys took it a little bit more seriously than I thought they would, so it just kind of stuck."

Video: Maile announces his Players' Weekend nickname

Russell Martin: "LE MUSCLE"

The Blue Jays' French-Canadian catcher is known for his power and endurance behind the plate, hence the name "Russell Le Muscle."

Kendrys Morales: "MONINA"

"In Cuba, it's like 'friend,'" Morales said through an interpreter. "I've always been called that by everybody, and everybody calls me that, too."

Jake Petricka: "PETEY"
Kevin Pillar: "KP"

Pillar's usual "Superman" nickname was unavailable due to it being trademarked, so Pillar went with a variation of his name. Last year, he wore Superman cleats for Players' Weekend, which could be a possibility for this year.

Aaron Sanchez: "SANCHIZE"

Sanchez's nickname is a play on his last name, but it is also a reflection of his importance to the organization. He earned the nickname during his rise to prominence in the Blue Jays' 2015 run to the American League Championship Series.

Luis Santos: "EL NITO"
Justin Smoak: "MOAKEY"

Some call Smoak "Smoaky," but he says his Latino teammates call him "Moakey," and that's the variation he chose.

Yangervis Solarte: "TUTU"

The name comes from a friend who couldn't pronounce Yangervis, instead he just called him "tutu."

Marcus Stroman: "HDMH"

Stroman has switched from "Stro Show" to "HDMH," his personal motto standing for "Height Doesn't Measure Heart."

Ryan Tepera: "TEP"
Devon Travis: "D-TRAV"
Troy Tulowitzki: "TULO"
Richard Urena: "RICHI"

Gregor Chisholm has covered the Blue Jays for MLB.com since 2011. Follow him on Twitter @gregorMLB and Facebook, and listen to his podcast.

Toronto Blue Jays

Stroman DL-bound after blister ends outing

Blue Jays' 4-run first doesn't hold up in rainy opener vs. Yanks
MLB.com @gregorMLB

NEW YORK -- Marcus Stroman gained a reputation of being an innings-eater during the early stages of his career, but that hasn't been the case this month, thanks in large part to a blister on his right middle finger that has him heading to the disabled list, according to his manager.

Stroman was limited to five innings or fewer for the third time in four outings on Friday night in the Blue Jays' 7-5 rain-shortened loss to the Yankees at Yankee Stadium. He allowed five runs on six hits and a pair of walks over four frames while throwing 54 of his 88 pitches for strikes. The loss went to righty Joe Biagini, who allowed one run in relief.

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NEW YORK -- Marcus Stroman gained a reputation of being an innings-eater during the early stages of his career, but that hasn't been the case this month, thanks in large part to a blister on his right middle finger that has him heading to the disabled list, according to his manager.

Stroman was limited to five innings or fewer for the third time in four outings on Friday night in the Blue Jays' 7-5 rain-shortened loss to the Yankees at Yankee Stadium. He allowed five runs on six hits and a pair of walks over four frames while throwing 54 of his 88 pitches for strikes. The loss went to righty Joe Biagini, who allowed one run in relief.

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Since the blister has lingered for the last couple of weeks without any signs of improving, Blue Jays manager John Gibbons said on Saturday morning that the right-hander will go on the 10-day disabled list. Though it's not official, Gibbons indicated that Thomas Pannone will take his spot on the roster and start Wednesday against the Orioles.

Stroman left the Blue Jays clubhouse before the media was allowed in and did not make himself available for comment.

"His blister flared up on him again," Gibbons said. "It was irritating him and it was affecting him a little bit."

Video: TOR@NYY: Stroman strikes out Stanton in the 1st

Unlike Stroman's previous two starts, there wasn't a noticeable sign that the blister was bothering him against the Yankees. It didn't appear to bust open and start bleeding like it did against the Rays in his previous outing, but it was still apparent in his pitch selection. Stroman once again heavily relied on his sinker and cutter while eliminating most of his secondary offerings.

According to Statcast™, Stroman used his curveball just once, and 65 of his pitches were of the fastball variety. That's not the norm for a pitcher who typically uses his slider 30.5 percent of the time and a curveball/changeup 6.1 percent of the time. Stroman was able to go to his slider more often than he did in his previous two starts, but he's still clearly protecting himself against the lingering ailment.

With Stroman's blister causing issues, Gibbons turned things over to his bullpen with the Blue Jays locked in a 5-5 tie after 4 1/2 innings. Either way, this marked the seventh time in as many starts at Yankee Stadium since the beginning of 2015 that Stroman, a Long Island native, was not able to complete six innings. Stroman is 2-5 with a 6.37 ERA when pitching in the Bronx.

"There's no doubt, his finger irritates him when he's hitting those seams," Gibbons said. "He has battled through it before. It's a tough lineup. You're staring at that short right-field wall. … Tough night after a long day."

Video: TOR@NYY: Diaz singles home 2 runs with bases loaded

The Blue Jays got started early against Yankees right-hander Lance Lynn, batting around during a four-run first. Kendrys Morales, Kevin Pillar and Aledmys Diaz all had run-scoring singles as Toronto staked Stroman to a 4-0 lead before throwing a pitch, but the Yankees began chipping away right out of the gate.

Stroman allowed two two-out runs in the bottom of the first, on an RBI triple by Didi Gregorius and an RBI double by Miguel Andujar. Stroman held the Yankees scoreless the next two innings before New York took a 5-4 lead in the fourth inning on a three-run homer by Neil Walker. Stroman finished the inning and was taken off the hook for a loss when Toronto tied the game at 5 in the fifth on an RBI single by Devon Travis, but the righty didn't return for the bottom half of the frame.

Video: TOR@NYY: Travis plates Granderson with single in 5th

Toronto hasn't been experiencing much luck with the weather of late either. Three of the Blue Jays' four games in Kansas City earlier this week were delayed because of rain, and it was an issue again in New York. After a Giancarlo Stanton homer off Luis Santos made it a 7-5 game in the bottom of the seventh inning, play was suspended and later called because of inclement weather.

"It affects both teams, so you just deal with it," Gibbons said of the 85-minute delay before the game was called. "It's not like it's the first time it has ever happened. This time of the year, everybody is tired to begin with. Everybody is professionals, so you just try to push through it as best you can."

MOMENTS THAT MATTERED
On the move: The Blue Jays were the victim of a perfectly executed hit-and-run in the bottom of the fifth. With one out, Biagini induced what normally would have been an inning-ending double-play grounder off the bat of Andujar. The problem was that Aaron Hicks was running on the play and Travis vacated his position at second to cover the bag, allowing the ball to sneak through. Gleyber Torres later grounded into an RBI fielder's choice that scored the go-ahead run.

Video: TOR@NYY: Torres brings home Hicks on fielder's choice

Going yard: Stroman made it through each of his last five starts without allowing a home run, but his good fortunes came to an end when Walker hit a three-run shot to right field that was projected by Statcast™ to travel 402 feet with an exit velocity of 101 mph. It was the first home run Stroman had allowed since Boston's Xander Bogaerts hit a solo homer off him on July 15.

Video: TOR@NYY: Walker smacks 3-run HR to right field in 4th

SOUND SMART
Russell Martin (1-for-3) has reached base safely in 14 consecutive games and is batting .366/.509/.659 during that span with 10 runs, three doubles, three homers, seven RBIs and nine walks.

UP NEXT
Right-hander Sean Reid-Foley (0-1, 5.40 ERA) will make the second start of his big league career when the Blue Jays continue their three-game series against the Yankees on Saturday afternoon at Yankee Stadium. Reid-Foley made his Major League debut earlier this week in Kansas City and allowed three runs over five innings while being saddled with the loss. New York will counter with ace right-hander Luis Severino (15-6, 3.27). First pitch is scheduled for 1:05 p.m. ET, but it is expected to be pushed back by approximately 30 minutes as the Yankees honor their 1998 World Series team in an on-field ceremony before the start of the game.

Gregor Chisholm has covered the Blue Jays for MLB.com since 2011. Follow him on Twitter @gregorMLB and Facebook, and listen to his podcast.

Toronto Blue Jays, Marcus Stroman

Blue Jays derailed by balk in loss to Royals

Gaviglio labors in pivotal 3-run 4th to extend winless streak
Special to MLB.com

KANSAS CITY -- There were encouraging early signs that Blue Jays starter Sam Gaviglio might be on his way toward getting his first victory since May 25. But after a bizarre balk sequence in the fourth inning, nothing much went right for the right-hander.

Instead the Royals used a three-run rally in the fourth as a springboard to a 6-2 victory on Thursday night at Kauffman Stadium. That meant Gaviglio's winless streak reached 15 starts, which tied Ricky Romero for the second-longest streak in club history.

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KANSAS CITY -- There were encouraging early signs that Blue Jays starter Sam Gaviglio might be on his way toward getting his first victory since May 25. But after a bizarre balk sequence in the fourth inning, nothing much went right for the right-hander.

Instead the Royals used a three-run rally in the fourth as a springboard to a 6-2 victory on Thursday night at Kauffman Stadium. That meant Gaviglio's winless streak reached 15 starts, which tied Ricky Romero for the second-longest streak in club history.

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"It was a tough night," manager John Gibbons said of Gaviglio's outing. "He has been getting hit around a little bit lately, primarily because pitches are up in the zone. That's not his style. You can't do that."

It was all going according to plan for Gaviglio as he held a 2-1 lead in the fourth with two out and none on. But Rosell Herrera singled to right and that's where the positives began to dissipate for Gaviglio.

Video: TOR@KC: Gaviglio balks, Herrera advances

On a rainy night that prompted a delay of 2 hours, 14 minutes at the outset, Gaviglio attempted to keep Herrera close by throwing to first. But the ball slipped out of his hand as he was in his throwing motion and Herrera was awarded second on a balk call.

Gibbons came out for a clarification and the umpires eventually called for a rules check. They received verification that when a pitcher fails to complete a throw to first it is by definition a balk.

Gaviglio had to stand around and wait for the play to be sorted out and then promptly surrendered three consecutive scoring hits. An RBI triple by Jorge Bonifacio tied the game at 2 and Ryan O'Hearn put the Royals ahead with an RBI single. A run-scoring double by Hunter Dozier completed the two-out uprising.

Gaviglio refused to use the delay as an excuse for how his fourth inning unraveled.

"No, I don't think so," Gaviglio said. "I think I just got a little elevated. Two quick outs [in the fourth]. I need to get through that. I just made a few mistakes and they took advantage of it."

Royals right-hander Glenn Sparkman, making his first Major League start in place of the injured Danny Duffy, allowed two runs on four hits through four innings before the Kansas City bullpen took over. Gaviglio went 4 1/3 innings, allowing eight hits and five runs.

JANSEN IMPRESSES
In his third Major League start, catcher Danny Jansen went 1-for-3 with an RBI as he lifted his batting average to .400 (4-for-10).

Jansen gave the Blue Jays a 1-0 lead in the second with his sacrifice fly to right.

Video: TOR@KC: Jansen plates Hernandez with a sacrifice fly

"Good piece of hitting," Gibbons said. "Two strikes and he shot that ball to right field for a sacrifice fly. He has handled himself like a champ."

SOUND SMART
With his outfield assist in the second inning, left fielder Teoscar Hernandez is only one behind the Major League leaders.

Video: TOR@KC: Hernandez throws out Bonifacio at second

Hernandez threw out Bonifacio as Bonifacio tried to stretch a single into a double. It was the ninth outfield assist for Hernandez this season.

UP NEXT
Blue Jays right-hander Marcus Stroman (4-8, 5.03 ERA) gets the ball for the opener of a three-game series at 7:05 p.m. ET on Friday at Yankee Stadium. Stroman allowed one run on five hits over five innings in a no-decision against the Rays in his last time out on Sunday. The Yanks will go with righty Lance Lynn (8-8, 4.46 ERA), who has been highly effective since coming over from the Twins. He allowed just one run over his first 16 2/3 innings with New York.

Robert Falkoff is a contributor to MLB.com based in Kansas City.

Toronto Blue Jays, Sam Gaviglio

Every 30-30 season, ranked by club

MLB.com

The marvel of the 30-30 club is predicated on the rare combination of speed and power it takes to swipe 30 bases and bash 30 homers in the same season. The feat has been pulled off just 60 times in baseball history, though there are a few players who could join the club in 2018, starting with Cleveland's Jose Ramirez, who has already surpassed 30 homers and has 27 steals through Wednesday's action.

40-40 club: 40 steals, 40 homers in a season

The marvel of the 30-30 club is predicated on the rare combination of speed and power it takes to swipe 30 bases and bash 30 homers in the same season. The feat has been pulled off just 60 times in baseball history, though there are a few players who could join the club in 2018, starting with Cleveland's Jose Ramirez, who has already surpassed 30 homers and has 27 steals through Wednesday's action.

40-40 club: 40 steals, 40 homers in a season

Here is a team-by-team breakdown of the 30-30 club, ranked in order from the team with the most 30-30 seasons to least -- there are actually eight teams that have never had someone pull off the feat. (Note: We list franchises together, even if the club moved.) 

Giants: 7
Barry Bonds, 1997 (40 HR, 37 SB)
Barry Bonds, 1996 (42 HR, 40 SB)
Barry Bonds, 1995 (33 HR, 31 SB)
Bobby Bonds, 1973 (39 HR, 43 SB)
Bobby Bonds, 1969 (32 HR, 45 SB)
Willie Mays, 1957 (35 HR, 38 SB)
Willie Mays, 1956 (36 HR, 40 SB)
Mays posted the first two 30-30 seasons in National League history, and narrowly missed the mark in 1958 (29 HR, 31 SB) and '59 (34-27). In the twilight of his career, he saw teammate Bobby Bonds accomplish the feat twice with the Giants (en route to finishing his career with five). The younger Bonds later matched his father with his third, fourth and fifth 30-30 seasons in the late '90s -- no other hitter has notched three straight such campaigns. Remarkably, both of the Bonds came within four homers or steals of another 30-30 campaign three times each.

Mets: 5
David Wright, 2007 (30 HR, 34 SB)
Howard Johnson, 1991 (38 HR, 30 SB)
Howard Johnson, 1989 (36 HR, 41 SB)
Howard Johnson, 1987 (36 HR, 32 SB)
Darryl Strawberry, 1987 (39 HR, 36 SB)
It's surprising to see Strawberry's name on this list only once -- though it should come as no surprise that he also came close in 1984 (26 HR, 27 SB), '85 (29-26), '86 (27-28) and '88 (39-29). Johnson, his teammate for nine seasons, wasn't even an All-Star in '87, when the Mets became one of only two teams ever with two 30-30 players in a season. Only Mike Cameron came close until Wright's career-best '07 campaign.

Video: NYM@CHC: Strawberry swipes bag, joins 30/30 club

Braves: 4
Ron Gant, 1991 (32 HR, 34 SB)
Ron Gant, 1990 (32 HR, 33 SB)
Dale Murphy, 1983 (36 HR, 30 SB)
Hank Aaron, 1963 * (44 HR, 31 SB)
* Milwaukee Braves
Aaron's 30-30 season was just the fourth in history, and he came close again in 1968 (29 HR, 28 SB). Gant came close again when he had 36 homers and 26 steals in 1993. In Chipper Jones' NL MVP Award-winning year of 1999, he slugged 45 homers and swiped 25 bags, which is Atlanta's closest call since then.

Rangers: 4
Ian Kinsler, 2011 (32 HR, 30 SB)
Ian Kinsler, 2009 (31 HR, 31 SB)
Alfonso Soriano, 2005 (36 HR, 30 SB)
Bobby Bonds, 1978 (31 HR, 43 SB)
Bonds posted the last of his then-unheard-of five 30-30 seasons in 1978, starting the year with the White Sox before posting the majority of his homers (29) and steals (37) in 130 games with the Rangers. His five 30-30 campaigns was matched only by his son, Barry, though Soriano also came close with four. The consistent Kinsler's only 30-30 campaigns came in the only two 30-steal seasons of his career.

Video: TEX@LAA: Kinsler joins 30-30 club with steal of third

Astros: 3
Carlos Beltran, 2004 (38 HR, 42 SB)
Jeff Bagwell, 1999 (42 HR, 30 SB)
Jeff Bagwell, 1997 (43 HR, 31 SB)
Beltran actually split his memorable 2004 season between Kansas City and Houston, coming over via trade just ahead of the non-waiver Trade Deadline. Beltran swiped a career-high 42 bases that year, including 28 in just 90 games with the Astros. Bagwell, who was never overly touted for his speed, quietly swiped 61 of his career 202 over the 1997 and '99 seasons. 

Video: HOU@CIN: Bagwell is first Astro to join 30-30 club

Brewers: 3
Ryan Braun, 2012 (41 HR, 30 SB)
Ryan Braun, 2011 (33 HR, 33 SB)
Tommy Harper, 1970 (31 HR, 38 SB)
Coming off a 73-steal campaign with the expansion Seattle Pilots in 1969, Harper knocked a career-high 31 homers in '70 for the first 30-30 season in the American League since Ken Williams of the St. Louis Browns in '22. Braun's two 30-30 seasons were the only 30-steal campaigns of his career, for which he won the NL MVP Award in 2011.

Video: MIL@CIN: Braun homers twice to join 30-30 club

Dodgers: 3
Matt Kemp, 2011 (39 HR, 40 SB)
Raul Mondesi, 1999 (33 HR, 36 SB)
Raul Mondesi, 1997 (30 HR, 32 SB)
Davey Lopes, Pedro Guerrero and Kirk Gibson all came close, but Mondesi finally became the first Dodger in the 30-30 club with the only 30-steal campaigns of his 13-year career in 1997 and '99. Kemp flirted with the feat in 2009 (26 HR, 34 SB) before achieving it in '11 with a league-leading 39 homers and 126 RBIs to go with a career-best 40 steals. He lost the NL MVP Award to Braun, a fellow 30-30 club member in '11.

Video: COL@LAD: Kemp joins 30-30 club with homer in seventh

Nationals: 3
Alfonso Soriano, 2006 (46 HR, 41 SB)
Vladimir Guerrero, 2002 * (39 HR, 40 SB)
Vladimir Guerrero, 2001 * (34 HR, 37 SB)
* Montreal Expos
Guerrero had two 30-steal seasons in his 16-year career, and he made the most of both with a pair of 30-30 campaigns, narrowly missing the fourth 40-40 season in history in 2002. Four years later, following the franchise's move to the nation's capital, Soriano recorded the most homers ever in a 30-30 campaign (his fourth) and registered the fourth and final 40-40 season to date.

Phillies: 3
Jimmy Rollins, 2007 (30 HR, 41 SB)
Bobby Abreu, 2004 (30 HR, 40 SB)
Bobby Abreu, 2001 (31 HR, 36 SB)
Abreu's 2001 and '04 campaigns were the finest of his career, representing the two highest homer and steal totals of his 18 seasons in the Major Leagues. Rollins was always a threat on the basepaths, but his power only began to emerge later in his career, culminating in a career-high 30 homers, 41 steals and league-leading triple (20) and run (139) totals in his 2007 NL MVP Award-winning campaign.

Reds: 3
Brandon Phillips, 2007 (30 HR, 32 SB)
Barry Larkin, 1996 (33 HR, 36 SB)
Eric Davis, 1987 (37 HR, 50 SB)
In 1987, Davis joined the 30-30 club in style, becoming the first player to do so with 50 steals (only Barry Bonds has joined him since) -- and he only played in 129 games. A season earlier, he was only three homers shy of an astonishing 30-80 season. Davis and Rickey Henderson remain the only members of the 20-80 club. Larkin's 33 homers in '96 were by far a career high, as were Phillips' 30 long balls in 2007.

Video: HOU@CIN: Phillips joins 30-30 club with 30th homer

Rockies: 3
Larry Walker, 1997 (49 HR, 33 SB)
Dante Bichette, 1996 (31 HR, 31 SB)
Ellis Burks, 1996 (40 HR, 32 SB)
The 1996 Blake Street Bombers were the second team in history ('87 Mets) with two 30-30 hitters in the same season. Bichette wasn't so much of a surprise -- he'd posted double-digit homers and steals in the three previous years. But Burks raised some eyebrows with his 30-30 campaign, as he'd stolen a combined 36 bases in the previous six seasons. Walker's 49 homers and 33 steals were both career highs as he won the NL MVP Award in '97.

Yankees: 3
Alfonso Soriano, 2003 (38 HR, 35 SB)
Alfonso Soriano, 2002 (39 HR, 41 SB)
Bobby Bonds, 1975 (32 HR, 30 SB)
Though Mickey Mantle (31 HR, 21 SB) came reasonably close in 1959, Bonds became the first Yankee in the 30-30 club in '75. Rickey Henderson had a pair of 20-80 campaigns, including a 28-homer, 87-steal season in '86, but it was Soriano that ultimately joined Bonds with the first two of his four 30-30 seasons. Since then, Curtis Granderson came closest, with 41 homers and 25 steals in 2011.

Video: NYY@BAL: Soriano clubs 30th homer to join 30-30 club

Angels: 2
Mike Trout, 2012 (30 HR, 48 SB)
Bobby Bonds, 1977 (37 HR, 41 SB)
Trout took the Majors by storm during his rookie season in 2012, compiling a 30-30 year that hasn't been matched since. Some argue that had it not been for Miguel Cabrera winning the first Triple Crown in 45 years that Trout would've won the AL MVP Award that season. Bonds spent parts of just two seasons in Anaheim, and he made his second count. 

Video: LAA@TEX: Trout becomes youngest member of 30/30 club

Blue Jays: 2
Jose Cruz, 2001 (34 HR, 32 SB)
Shawn Green, 1998 (35 HR, 35 SB)
The 1998 Jays missed the playoffs despite Green posting the first 30-30 season in team history and Jose Canseco coming a steal shy (46 HR, 29 SB) of joining him. The 35 steals were a career high for Green, who hadn't posted more than 16 homers or steals in a season to that point. Cruz more than doubled his previous career high in steals for his 30-30 campaign.

Cubs: 2
Sammy Sosa, 1995 (36 HR, 34 SB)
Sammy Sosa, 1993 (33 HR, 36 SB)
Sosa began his career with decent power and great speed before morphing into the feared slugger that he became in his prime. During his transition, his power and speed came together for a pair of 30-30 campaigns, including his first All-Star season in 1995. Ryne Sandberg had come close in '90 (40 HR, 25 SB), and Corey Patterson came close most recently (24-32) in 2004.

Video: PIT@CHC: Sosa joins 30/30 club for second time

Indians: 2
Grady Sizemore, 2008 (33 HR, 38 SB)
Joe Carter, 1987 (32 HR, 31 SB)
Carter's only 30-steal season of his 16-year career gained him entry to the 30-30 club in 1987 after he came a homer and a steal shy a year earlier. He threatened again a season later (27 HR, 27 SB). Before injuries derailed a promising career, Sizemore was a perennial 30-30 threat, finally achieving the feat in 2008 with career bests in both homers and steals.

Video: Sizemore's leadoff homer gets him into the 30-30 club

Marlins: 2
Hanley Ramirez, 2008 (33 HR, 35 SB)
Preston Wilson, 2000 (31 HR, 36 SB)
Ramirez burst onto the scene with a pair of 50-steal seasons to start his career, but as his power numbers increased, his stolen-base numbers dwindled, and though he came close in 2007 (29 HR, 51 SB), his only 30-30 season came a year later. Wilson swiped 87 bags in four full seasons with the Marlins, and a career-high total of 36 came in '00.

Video: Hanley Ramirez joins the 30-30 club

Pirates: 2
Barry Bonds, 1992 (34 HR, 39 SB)
Barry Bonds, 1990 (33 HR, 52 SB)
Bonds' 52 steals in 1990 were the most in a 30-30 campaign, putting him in an elite group -- he and the Reds' Eric Davis (in '87) are the only members of the 30-50 club. Needless to say, he won the first of his seven NL MVP Awards that year, and he repeated the feat two years later, winning another MVP Award in his walk year before joining the Giants in free agency. More recently, Jason Bay, Nate McLouth and Andrew McCutchen have come close.

Video: PHI@PIT: Bonds hits 30th homer to join 30-30 club

Athletics: 1
Jose Canseco, 1988 (42 HR, 40 SB)
Forget 30-30 -- how about 40-40? Canseco's memorable 1988 campaign saw him lead the Majors with 42 homers and 124 RBIs en route to the AL MVP Award, and he became not only the first in franchise history to 30-30, but he also became the first in baseball history to 40-40. Only three others have matched the feat since.

Video: OAK@MIL: Canseco becomes first player to go 40/40

Mariners: 1
Alex Rodriguez, 1998 (42 HR, 46 SB)
Many don't associate Rodriguez with speed anymore, but he stole double-digit bases in 13 of his first 14 full seasons in the Major Leagues. A-Rod posted lofty homer and RBI totals as a 22-year-old shortstop in 1998, and he also ran wild that season, swiping a career-high 46 bags (but also being caught 13 times), posting one of only four 40-40 seasons in history.

Orioles: 1
Ken Williams, 1922 * (39 HR, 37 SB)
* St. Louis Browns
The idea of a 30-30 season before the end of the dead ball era in 1920 was far-fetched, but with the emergence of sluggers like Babe Ruth and Rogers Hornsby, it became at least a possibility -- though Ruth wasn't exactly known for his speed. Williams had both the power and speed tools, though, and in '22, with Ruth suspended for 60 games to open the season, Williams led the league in homers and swiped 37 bags for the first 30-30 campaign in baseball history.

Red Sox: 1
Jacoby Ellsbury, 2011 (32 HR, 39 SB)
For as long as the storied Red Sox franchise has been around, it took until Ellsbury's tremendous 2011 campaign, the only season of his career with more than 16 homers, for Boston to finally have a hitter join the 30-30 club. Carl Yastrzemski (40 HR, 23 SB) came close in 1970, as did Nomar Garciaparra (30 HR, 22 SB) in '97, and Mookie Betts is on pace to join Ellsbury in 2018, boasting 27 homers and 24 steals with over a month remaining in the season.

Video: BOS@NYY: Ellsbury homers to become part of 30-30 club

Cardinals: 0
Closest call: Ray Lankford, 1998 (31 HR, 26 SB)
For all of their rich history, the Cardinals perhaps suprisingly haven't had a player compile a 30-30 season. Lankford was perhaps the closest to accomplish the feat, coming just four stolen bases shy in 1998. 

D-backs: 0
Closest call: Paul Goldschmidt, 2016 (24 HR, 32 SB)
A perennial threat on the bases -- in spite of his size, stature and position -- Goldschmidt stole a career-high 32 bases in 2016, but he did so in a year where he had a power drought, at least by his standards, which is why he's included here. Goldschmidt had clubbed 30 homers in three of his six full seasons entering '18. In an era where clubs are becoming more apprehensive on the basepaths, the D-backs remain one of the most aggressive. Perhaps they won't be without a member for long. 

Padres: 0
Closest call: Wil Myers, 2016 (28 HR, 28 SB)
Myers came just two homers and two stolen bases shy of becoming the first player in Friars history to join the coveted club during his All-Star season in 2016. 

Rays: 0
Closest call: Melvin Upton Jr., 2012 (28 HR, 31 SB)
Upton put together one of his best seasons in 2012, coming just two homers shy of becoming the first Rays player to join the 30-30 club. Upton's 31 stolen bases that year were impressive, but three times in his career he exceeded 40. His 28 homers in '12 were a personal high, and he clubbed them in the final year before he hit free agency. That offseason, Upton signed a massive multiyear contract with the Braves. 

Royals: 0
Closest call: Carlos Beltran, 2002 (29 HR, 35 SB)
There can't be a more credible close call here than an actual member of the 30-30 club, and despite coming just one homer shy in 2002, he went on to join the club two seasons later, in a year he was traded from the Royals to the Astros. 

Tigers: 0
Closest call: Kirk Gibson, 1985 (29 HR, 30 SB)
Gibson clubbed a career-high 29 in 1985, coming just one deep fly shy of being the lone Tiger in the franchise's rich history in the 30-30 club. 

Twins: 0
Closest call: Corey Koskie, 2001 (26 HR, 27 SB)
No Twins player has come all that close to joining the 30-30 club other than Koskie, who put together his best offensive year in 2001 but didn't reach either of the baselines.

White Sox: 0
Closest call: Magglio Ordonez, 2001 (31 HR, 25 SB)
The six-time All-Star had one of his best seasons in 2001, leading the team with 25 steals. No White Sox player has come all that more close to joining the club, though, before or since. 

Daniel Kramer is a reporter for MLB.com based in Denver. Follow him on Twitter at @DKramer_.

Do-Hyoung Park is a reporter for MLB.com based in the Bay Area. Follow him on Twitter at @dohyoungpark.