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Jeter, Sherman turn attention to play on the field

As Marlins open full-squad workouts, new owners excited
MLB.com @JoeFrisaro

JUPITER, Fla. -- After spending the offseason revamping the organization and restructuring the roster, the Marlins opened full-squad workouts on Monday at the Roger Dean Stadium complex in Jupiter, Fla.

"This is what everyone looks forward to," Marlins chief executive officer Derek Jeter said. "They look forward to paying attention to what happens on the field. There's been a lot of noise that's been out there, a lot of stories that's been out there. A lot of people want to see what happens on the field."

JUPITER, Fla. -- After spending the offseason revamping the organization and restructuring the roster, the Marlins opened full-squad workouts on Monday at the Roger Dean Stadium complex in Jupiter, Fla.

"This is what everyone looks forward to," Marlins chief executive officer Derek Jeter said. "They look forward to paying attention to what happens on the field. There's been a lot of noise that's been out there, a lot of stories that's been out there. A lot of people want to see what happens on the field."

• Marlins' Spring Training information

The ownership group headed by Bruce Sherman and Jeter purchased the club from Jeffrey Loria for $1.2 billion in October, and they repeated they are building the franchise from the bottom up.

"This is a dream come true," said Sherman, the organization's principal owner. "I'm an analytical person by nature. I got into this with full disclosure. I was privileged and honored to have the opportunity to participate in a Florida franchise in Major League Baseball.

:: Spring Training coverage presented by Camping World ::

"I think it comes across once in a lifetime. My family has been supportive. Derek has been great. It's just a privilege. We now want to give back to the city, the county, the state and have a sustainable product out there for a long, long time."

Sherman made it clear ownership has a long-term commitment and is not seeking to turn short-term profits.

"I didn't get into this personally, nor did the other partners get into this, for one, two or three years," Sherman said. "Nobody is in this to make any short-term profits, whatsoever. This is a long, long haul, and I'm excited we get to play baseball now and I can be a fan again."

To move the franchise forward, the Marlins broke up the previous core, trading Giancarlo Stanton, Dee Gordon, Christian Yelich and Marcell Ozuna.

Video: Hot Stove discusses Gary Denbo's role with Marlins

The organization made it clear the day they took over in October that some moves would be unpopular. The reality the Marlins face was they were 77-85 in 2017 -- their eighth straight losing season. The organization lacked pitching and depth, and the decision was made to break the roster down to strengthen their Minor League system while creating payroll flexibility.

Some of the moves have created a negative public backlash, but Jeter reminds that many fans are supportive.

Tweet from @Marlins: This is brand new. This is the beginning.#MarlinsST pic.twitter.com/wl0k82gTUk

"That narrative needs to start to change that every single fan is upset," Jeter said. "I've met with many fans over the last four months, who all said, 'We have patience.' They understand what we're doing. They're giving us a chance. Mentioning that all fans are upset, that can't be further from the truth."

Joe Frisaro has covered the Marlins for MLB.com since 2002. Follow him on Twitter @JoeFrisaro and listen to his podcast.

Miami Marlins

Brinson visits Parkland students in hospital

Native of nearby Coral Springs, Fla., Marlins outfielder glad to cheer up kids
MLB.com @JoeFrisaro

JUPITER, Fla. -- The day before the Marlins started full-squad workouts, outfielder Lewis Brinson had more than baseball on his mind. The 23-year-old made a trip to a local hospital to visit two students being treated for injuries sustained in last week's shootings at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla.

Brinson made an impromptu visit and spent some time with the students and their families. He had not previously known the students, nor did he reveal their full names or which specific hospital they are being treated.

JUPITER, Fla. -- The day before the Marlins started full-squad workouts, outfielder Lewis Brinson had more than baseball on his mind. The 23-year-old made a trip to a local hospital to visit two students being treated for injuries sustained in last week's shootings at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla.

Brinson made an impromptu visit and spent some time with the students and their families. He had not previously known the students, nor did he reveal their full names or which specific hospital they are being treated.

• Marlins' Spring Training information

"Those kids are warriors," Brinson said. "What they went through, all the wounds they have. They have battle scars for being in high school. That's unheard of. It needs to stop at some point."

A resident of Coral Springs, Fla., Brinson lives close to Stoneman Douglas High, which was his high school's biggest rival. Brinson and the Marlins will pay tribute to Stoneman Douglas on their caps prior to Friday's Grapefruit League opener against the Cardinals in Jupiter.

:: Spring Training coverage presented by Camping World ::

"It was a hard moment for me last week just to know something could go on in a neighborhood I grew up in," Brinson said. "It was a tough pill for me to swallow. But they'll get through it."

On Monday, it was time for baseball, with the Marlins having their first full-squad workouts at the Roger Dean Chevrolet Stadium complex. But Brinson pledged that he would make a return visit to see the Douglas students.

"I told them I would be back to check on them," Brinson said. "For all the heartache and pain they're going through, I was glad I was able to put a smile on those kids' faces. Just to say hi to them."

Tweet from @JoeFrisaro: Taking his swings @LewisBrinson @Marlins #SpringTraining pic.twitter.com/YAaUQnQjyo

Ready to turn the page

Before taking the field for the first full-squad workouts, a couple of prominent Marlins from the past few seasons once again addressed Miami's offseason moves.

In a busy offseason, the Marlins traded Giancarlo Stanton, Dee Gordon, Christian Yelich and Marcell Ozuna. The revamped roster includes a number of new faces that were acquired in those offseason trades.

Third baseman Martin Prado said the players who were dealt will be missed, but it's time for a new beginning.

"Those guys are super professional," Prado said. "I wish them the best, wherever they are at. Now, I have to handle myself. I have to handle my new teammates. We have to move on."

First baseman Justin Bour noted that even last season, when the team fell far out of the race by the All-Star break, that sweeping changes could be made.

Video: Outlook: Bour poised for elite season if healthy

"I think we had a good possibility this could happen," Bour said. "We talked to each other throughout the season and this offseason. We realized it was something that might take place. It wasn't like some crazy thing just happened out of nowhere.

"Obviously, it's tough to lose those guys. We played with them. They're your friends. But you've got to continue to do your job, be professional and go out there and play every day."

Live BP

With the first Grapefruit League game scheduled for Friday against the Cardinals, the position players don't have much time before they see game action.

So the first day position players were on the field, the hitters faced live pitching.

"It's definitely an advantage for the pitchers," catcher J.T. Realmuto said. "It's tough as a batter the first day of live BP. It looks like everybody is throwing 110 mph. So that's always fun."

Among the pitchers Realmuto faced were hard-throwing Sandy Alcantara, who does throw 100 mph. Realmuto lined one Alcantara fastball to deep center field.

Tweet from @JoeFrisaro: Future @Marlins aces Jorge Guzman (left) and Sandy Alcantara #SpringTraining 🔥 ������ Both regularly top 100 mph @MLB pic.twitter.com/HqqHHL2hjc

"For the pitchers, it's just nice for them to finally get a hitter in the box and kind of working on the stuff they've been working on, and actually competing and trying to get guys out," Realmuto said.

Worth noting

• The roster is at 69 players, but one was unable to report. Outfielder Rafael Ortega had visa issues and has not been able to leave his native Venezuela.

Up next: The Marlins on Tuesday will be taking the field at 9:30 a.m. ET at the Roger Dean Chevrolet Stadium complex. Workouts are open to the public.

Joe Frisaro has covered the Marlins for MLB.com since 2002. Follow him on Twitter @JoeFrisaro and listen to his podcast.

Miami Marlins

MLB announces pace of play initiatives for '18

MLB.com @_dadler

Major League Baseball will implement new pace of play rules for the 2018 season, Commissioner Rob Manfred announced Monday, but there will be no pitch clock this season.

After consulting with the MLB Players Association and all 30 clubs, MLB announced its slate of rules changes, among them a limit on mound visits per game.

Major League Baseball will implement new pace of play rules for the 2018 season, Commissioner Rob Manfred announced Monday, but there will be no pitch clock this season.

After consulting with the MLB Players Association and all 30 clubs, MLB announced its slate of rules changes, among them a limit on mound visits per game.

A pitch clock -- giving the pitcher a certain amount of time to deliver the ball -- had been one of the major proposals considered. MLB decided to defer implementation of a pitch clock, as well as a between-batter timer, in order to give players an opportunity to respond to the new rules and positively affect pace of play throughout the 2018 season.

"I am pleased that we were able to reach an understanding with the Players Association to take concrete steps to address pace of play with the cooperation of players," Manfred said in a statement. "My strong preference is to continue to have ongoing dialogue with players on this topic to find mutually acceptable solutions."

New phone lines connecting the video review rooms and the dugout will be installed and monitored, limiting the ability of teams to steal signs, which is viewed as a contributing factor to the increasing number of mound visits. Rules governing when players can and cannot leave the batter's box between pitches, instituted during the 2017 season, remain in effect.

"Players were involved in the pace of game discussion from Day 1, and are committed to playing a crisp and exciting brand of baseball for the fans, but they remain concerned about rule changes that could alter the outcome of games and the fabric of the game itself -- now or in the future," said Tony Clark, the MLBPA executive director.

Here is a breakdown of the new rules:

• Mound visits: Mound visits will be limited to six per team per nine innings. Teams will receive an additional visit for every extra inning played. Any manager, coach or player visit to the mound will count as a mound visit. Visits to the mound to clean cleats in rainy weather, to check on an injury or potential injury or after the announcement of an offensive substitution are excepted. Also, normal communication between player and pitcher that do not require either to vacate their position on the field do not count as a visit. If a team is out of visits, the umpire will have discretion to grant a visit at the catcher's request if he believes there has been a cross-up between the pitcher and catcher.

Video: Hot Stove on mound visits regarding pace of play

• Between-inning breaks: As has been the case since the start of the 2016 season, a timer will count down between innings from 2:05 for breaks in locally televised games, from 2:25 in nationally televised games and from 2:55 for tiebreaker and postseason games. The difference now is that at the 25-second mark, the umpire will signal for the final warmup pitch and the pitcher must throw it before the clock hits 20. The batter will be announced at the 20-second mark and the pitcher must begin his windup to throw the first pitch of the inning as the clock hits zero. Another important change is that a pitcher is no longer guaranteed eight warmup pitches between innings. However, he can take as many as he wants within the countdown parameters noted above. The timer will start on the last out of the inning, unless the pitcher is on base, on deck or at bat, in which case the timer shall begin when the pitcher leaves the dugout for the mound. If the final out of the inning is subject to replay, the timer begins when the umpire signals the out.

• Timing of pitcher changes: The timing clock -- as listed above -- also applies to pitching changes, and it will begin as soon as the relief pitcher crosses the warning track.

Video: Hot Stove on batter's box rule, replay review changes

• Instant replay: All club video review rooms will now receive direct slow-motion camera angles in order to speed up challenges and the resulting review. New phone lines will connect the rooms to the dugout and will be monitored to prevent their use for sign stealing.

Summary of 2018 Rule Changes

I) Mound Visits 
1. Number
A. 2018 Championship Season. Mound visits without a pitching change shall be limited to six (6) per team, per nine innings. For any extra-innings played, each Club shall be entitled to one additional non-pitching change mound visit per inning.  
B. OBR 5.10(l). Official Baseball Rule 5.10(l), which governs mound visits by a manager or coach, remains in effect (i.e., a pitcher must be removed on the second visit by a manager/coach in an inning). 

2. Definition of Mound Visit. A manager or coach trip to the mound to meet with the pitcher shall constitute a visit. A player leaving his position to confer with the pitcher, including a pitcher leaving the mound to confer with another player, shall also constitute a mound visit, regardless of where the visit occurs or the length of the visit, except that the following shall not constitute mound visits:
A. Discussions between pitchers and position player(s) that (i) occur between batters in the normal course of play and do not require either the position player(s) or the pitcher to relocate;
B. Visits by position players to the mound to clean spikes in rainy conditions;
C. Visits to the mound due to an injury or potential injury of the pitcher; and
D. Visits to the mound after the announcement of an offensive substitution.

3. Cross-Up in Signs. In the event a team has exhausted its allotment of mound visits in a game (or extra inning) and the home plate umpire determines that the catcher and pitcher did not have a shared understanding of the location or type of pitch that had been signaled by the catcher (otherwise referred to as a "cross-up"), the home plate umpire may, upon request of the catcher, allow the catcher to make a brief mound visit. Any mound visit resulting from a cross-up prior to a team exhausting its allotted number of visits shall count against a team's total number of allotted mound visits.

II) Inning Breaks and Pitching Changes
1. Time of Break. The timer will count down from 2:05 for breaks in locally televised championship season games, from 2:25 for breaks in nationally televised championship season games, and from 2:55 for tie-breaker and postseason games as follows: 

Time Remaining | Required Action
25 seconds: 
Umpire signals pitcher to complete last warmup pitch.
20 seconds: Batter's announced and must leave on-deck circle, batter walk-up music shall begin, and pitcher shall complete last warmup pitch.
0 seconds: Pitcher must begin motion to deliver first pitch.

A. The pitcher may take as many warm-up pitches as he desires, but regardless of how many warm-up pitches he has thrown, he must deliver his final warm-up pitch at least 20 seconds prior to the end of an inning break or pitching change. OBR 5:07 will be revised to reflect that pitcher is not guaranteed eight warm-up pitches. 
B. The umpire shall signal for the last warm-up pitch at 25 seconds, unless a special circumstance (as described below) applies. 
C. The batter must leave the on-deck circle and proceed directly to the batter's box when the pitcher throws his final warm-up pitch.  
D. The pitcher must begin his motion for the first pitch as soon as the batter steps into the box and is alert to the pitcher; provided, however, the pitcher cannot begin his motion for the first pitch more than five seconds prior to the end of an inning break or pitching change so that television is ensured to be back from commercial break. 

2. Special Circumstances. A Player will be excused from following the time limits set forth above if the umpire determines that any of the following special circumstances are present:  
A. There is a delay in normal warm-up activities during the inning break due to no fault of the Players (e.g., injury or other medical emergency, equipment issues, playing field or grounds crew issues);
B. The umpire believes the pitcher is at a legitimate risk of injury if he does not receive additional time to throw warm-up pitches; 
C. The umpire believes the batter is at a legitimate risk of injury if he does not receive additional time to enter the batter's box; 
D. Any other special circumstances which, in the umpire's judgment, warrant allowing the pitcher to throw after the deadline. 

3. Start of Timer for Inning Breaks
A. Last Out of Inning. The timer shall start on the last out of an inning for an inning break.   
B. Close Plays/Replay Review. The Field Timing Coordinator shall delay the start of the timer if the final out of the inning is a close play that may be reviewed by instant replay. If the final out of the inning is determined in instant replay, the timer shall start as soon as the out is signaled by the umpire.  
C. Pitcher or Catcher On Base/On Deck. If a pitcher ends an inning on base, on deck, or at bat, the timer shall reset when the pitcher leaves the dugout for the mound. If a catcher ends the inning on base, on deck, or at bat, the timer will reset when the catcher enters the dugout (and another catcher must begin warming up the pitcher). 
 
4. Start of Timer for Pitching Changes
A. Pitcher Crosses Warning Track. The pitching change timer shall begin as soon as the relief pitcher crosses the warning track (or foul line for on-field bullpens) to enter the game. In the case of a pitching change that occurs during an inning break, the timer shall reset if previously started as soon as the relief pitcher crosses the warning track (or foul line for on-field bullpens).  
B. Relief Pitchers Must Promptly Leave Bullpen. Relief pitchers shall leave the bullpen promptly following an appropriate signal by their manager or coach. During the playing of God Bless America, or any other extended inning event previously approved by the Office of the Commissioner, the timer will begin at the conclusion of the song or event. 
 
5. Enforcement. Umpires shall direct players and enforce the inning break and pitching change time limits on the field. Players who consistently or flagrantly violate the time limits will be subject to progressive discipline for just cause by the Office of the Commissioner pursuant to Article XI(C) of the Basic Agreement.

III. Batter's Box Rule
The batter's box rule that was in effect during the 2017 season will remain in effect during the 2018 season.

IV. Video Replay Review
The following adjustments will be made to the video replay technology:
A. Install capability for all Club video review rooms to receive direct slow motion camera angles for the 2018 championship season; 
B. Install new phone lines connecting the video review rooms and the dugout, and monitor the communications over those lines to prevent their use for sign-stealing.

David Adler is a reporter for MLB.com based in New York. Follow him on Twitter at @_dadler.

Captain's Camp laying foundation for future

MLB.com @JoeFrisaro

JUPITER, Fla. -- As the Marlins embark on a new beginning under new ownership and leadership, the foundation of expectations is being ingrained into two dozen young players at "Captain's Camp."

Under the supervision of Marlins vice president of player development and scouting Gary Denbo, the camp is a three-week orientation program outlying organizational standards.

JUPITER, Fla. -- As the Marlins embark on a new beginning under new ownership and leadership, the foundation of expectations is being ingrained into two dozen young players at "Captain's Camp."

Under the supervision of Marlins vice president of player development and scouting Gary Denbo, the camp is a three-week orientation program outlying organizational standards.

Respect, accountability and being a good teammate are among the messages repeatedly being spoken daily.

"When they leave here, when they graduate from this camp, the expectations are high for these guys, and we expect them to take a leadership role in the clubhouses they go to, at whatever affiliate they start at, and even at the Major League level," Denbo said. "Their managers and coaches are going to know that these guys have been through this process and have a clear understanding of what it takes to become a championship-type player."

:: Spring Training coverage presented by Camping World ::

The camp started days before Spring Training opened and runs through Feb. 28. It involves workouts and meetings, which include guest speakers. Marlins manager Don Mattingly and former Major Leaguers Juan Pierre, Mike Lowell and Alfonso Soriano have already spoken to the players.

"It's a beginning of leadership that you're asking guys to play with," Mattingly said. "Accountability. We talk about, when a guy is coming into our system, no matter if it's A ball or whatever, you want them to know what the expectations are. If a guy knows this is what is expected of you, it's a lot easier to get guys on board with where you're going."

Participants range from Rookie League to the big leagues.

"That's the expectations of these guys going forward," Denbo said. "They're going to not only be held accountable for being a professional every day and preparing and competing the right way every day, but they're also going to be expected to hold their teammates accountable for doing things the right way."

Video: Mattingly discusses Marlins' new Captain's Camp

Denbo introduced Captain's Camp when he was with the Yankees, and he's now unveiling it in Miami. The beliefs being expressed to the Marlins' players mirror the image Derek Jeter, the Marlins' new chief executive officer, displayed when he was captain of the Yankees.

"There is some brainwashing going on here," Denbo said. "Every speaker that has come in so far has mentioned the word respect, mentioned the word accountability -- mentioned about being a good teammate and about treating other people fairly. I love that our players are hearing those words."

Some of the participants who have been juggling Captain's Camp and big league camp are pitching prospects Trevor Richards, Nick Neidert, Zac Gallen and Jordan Yamamoto.

Video: Hill pleased with young pitching depth of Marlins

Since Spring Training started on Wednesday, the four have still attended Captain's Camp meetings -- if there aren't any big league camp conflicts.

"The guys in that room in that camp right now are what they think is the future," Richards said. "They expect you to take what you learn in that camp and take it to each affiliate that you go to."

The Marlins open full-squad workouts on Monday, and a couple more Captain's Camp members will be in big league camp, including outfielder Monte Harrison and infielder Isan Diaz. According to MLB Pipeline, Harrison is Miami's No. 2 prospect, and Diaz is ninth.

"We have a lot of young guys in camp, moreso than in the past when I was with the Yankees," Denbo said. "This is a group that I like a lot. We have a lot of good young players here, athletic players with potential. I think this is the start of building the core group of players that hopefully competes for championships here over the next several years."

Tweet from @WoahitsNelly: Unreal feeling to see my name in this locker room pic.twitter.com/8PFDksmdoT

Before Spring Training started in Jupiter, Captain's Camp was held one day in Miami at Marlins Park.

"They definitely hold us to a higher standard," Neidert said. "They're basically laying the foundation of, 'Hey, this is what we expect from you guys. We want you to go out there and lead by example, and what you're learning in this camp.'"

Joe Frisaro has covered the Marlins for MLB.com since 2002. Follow him on Twitter @JoeFrisaro and listen to his podcast.

Miami Marlins

Marlins hope Prado will be ready Opening Day

Riddle (left shoulder surgery) also out of ST games until mid-March
MLB.com @JoeFrisaro

JUPITER, Fla. -- Full-squad workouts for the Marlins begin on Monday, but that doesn't mean two projected infield starters will be at full speed. Third baseman Martin Prado and shortstop JT Riddle are each in rehab protocol, and neither is expected to participate in Grapefruit League games until mid-March.

Prado underwent right knee surgery last season, and Riddle had left shoulder surgery. The two will spend the early part of Spring Training building back up.

JUPITER, Fla. -- Full-squad workouts for the Marlins begin on Monday, but that doesn't mean two projected infield starters will be at full speed. Third baseman Martin Prado and shortstop JT Riddle are each in rehab protocol, and neither is expected to participate in Grapefruit League games until mid-March.

Prado underwent right knee surgery last season, and Riddle had left shoulder surgery. The two will spend the early part of Spring Training building back up.

"We're going to be very patient with [Prado], making sure that he's kind of stepping along," Marlins manager Don Mattingly said on Sunday. "In my mind, and I think in our minds, he's still in rehab protocol from the standpoint of we're going to keep him to a minimum and work him towards making sure he's ready [Opening Day].

"Riddle is a lot like Martin. Again, he's coming off of surgery, and I still look at him as being in rehab. He really is in kind of rehab protocol from the standpoint of he can only do this, he can only do that."

:: Spring Training coverage presented by Camping World ::

With Prado out of game action, at least early in Spring Training, it opens opportunity for Brian Anderson, the organization's No. 8 prospect, according to MLB Pipeline. Non-roster invitees Johnny Giavotella, Eric Campbell and Peter Mooney will be among the candidates to get some time at third.

Miguel Rojas will work mostly at shortstop.

"They're talking about [Riddle] not being able to play until the middle of March," Mattingly said. "That's our earliest date. That's without anything else going on."

Prado had an injury-plagued 2017, appearing in just 37 big league games. He last saw big league action on July 17, and Riddle's last game came on July 19.

"[Prado] hasn't played in a year, if you really think about it," Mattingly said.

Video: Hill, Riddle on Marlins shortstop situation in 2018

Last Spring Training, Prado sustained a right hamstring injury at the World Baseball Classic. He opened the season on the disabled list and reinjured his hamstring again in May.

Eventually, Prado hurt his right knee, which required surgery.

"For me, the date on Martin is Opening Day," Mattingly said. "I'd love for Martin to be ready on Opening Day."

Worth noting

• Right-hander Severino Gonzalez has been outrighted. The 40-man roster is now at 39.

• Miami's first Grapefruit League game is on Friday, when the Marlins are the home team against the Cardinals at 1 p.m. ET at Roger Dean Chevrolet Stadium. Dillon Peters, the Marlins' 11th-ranked prospect, according to MLB Pipeline, will make the start. He is tentatively set to throw two innings.

• Since there are just four days before the first game, the hitters will waste little time seeing live pitching. On Monday, the first day of full-squad workouts, pitchers will face hitters.

• The Marlins will have 12 of their top 30 prospects, per MLB Pipeline, on the field on Monday. The list includes their top three prospects -- Lewis Brinson, Monte Harrison and Sandy Alcantara, respectively. Rounding out the top 30 list are: Magneuris Sierra (7th), Anderson (8th), Isan Diaz (9th), Nick Neidert (10th), Peters (11th), Merandy Gonzalez (13th), Zac Gallen (18th), Trevor Richards (27th) and Pablo Lopez (30th).

Up next: Full-squad workouts get underway at 1 p.m. ET on Monday on the back fields at the Roger Dean Chevrolet Stadium complex in Jupiter. Miami has 68 players in camp. Workouts are open to the public.

Joe Frisaro has covered the Marlins for MLB.com since 2002. Follow him on Twitter @JoeFrisaro and listen to his podcast.

Miami Marlins, Martin Prado, JT Riddle

Young pitchers spur excitement in front office

Hill lauds depth in all levels of Minors
MLB.com @JoeFrisaro

JUPITER, Fla. -- Sandy Alcantara, Nick Neidert, Zac Gallen, Merandy Gonzalez, Pablo Lopez and the list goes on of high-ceiling pitching prospects who have been added to what had been a thin Marlins' system.

Around the organization, the excitement level is high among team executives because they're finally getting to see the collection of promising pitchers throw off the mounds.

JUPITER, Fla. -- Sandy Alcantara, Nick Neidert, Zac Gallen, Merandy Gonzalez, Pablo Lopez and the list goes on of high-ceiling pitching prospects who have been added to what had been a thin Marlins' system.

Around the organization, the excitement level is high among team executives because they're finally getting to see the collection of promising pitchers throw off the mounds.

Spring Training: Info | Tickets | Gear

:: Spring Training coverage presented by Camping World ::

"I think you look around the first few days and you see the energy," Marlins president of baseball operations Michael Hill said. "You see the excitement. All of our pitchers and catchers alike, just understand what's in front of them. There's a tremendous opportunity in this organization to be a part of something that is going to be special."

With all their offseason turnover, the Marlins are getting aquainted to their new collection of young talent. Many are unknown names to fans, but within the industry, they're highly coveted. Five pitchers acquired in trades dating back to last July rank on the Marlins' Top 30 prospect list, according to MLB Pipeline.

Alcantara rates No. 3, and he projects as a top of the rotation talent. Neidert, per Pipeline, is the 10th-rated prospect, followed by Gonzalez (13), Gallen (18) and Lopez (30).

Marlins notebook: Campbell inivited to camp

"I think the biggest thing you'll see is there's layers of pitching depth now," Hill said. "There's pitchers that we've acquired that will fall right in with our existing inventory of pitching at the A-ball level. We were able to add a number of pitchers who will be a part of the Double-A and Triple-A rotations, and those who will be competing for our Major League rotation."

Of all the pitchers in camp, Alcantara is the most celebrated. The hard-throwing right-hander threw 8 1/3 innings at the big league level with the Cardinals in 2017. The 22-year-old features a fastball, that according to Statcast™, averaged 98.51 mph.

Video: Top Prospects: Sandy Alcantara, RHP, Marlins

Miami acquired Alcantara from St. Louis as part of the Marcell Ozuna trade. Alcantara is competing for an Opening Day rotation spot, but if the club feels he isn't completely ready, he could open at Triple-A New Orleans.

Neidert came to Miami from the Mariners in the Dee Gordon trade in December. Gonzalez was involved in the deal made last July with the Mets for AJ Ramos.

Lopez is a 21-year-old who was part of the David Phelps trade with the Mariners last summer. Lopez may be ranked 30th on the prospect list, but he's already impressing the staff.

As the Marlins build their system from the bottom up, they've made an effort to infuse players into every organizational level, from Class A ball up to Triple-A, and eventually into the big leagues.

Video: Top Prospects: Merandy Gonzalez, RHP, Marlins

"We didn't have depth," Hill said. "I don't think that's a secret. We didn't have upper-level depth. When you don't, it puts you in a tough spot. For us to be built the right way, and to have a sustainable organization, you have to have depth at the Minor League level."

Of the five pitchers, Alcantara and Gonzalez are on the 40-man roster. For all, Spring Training is a showcase, but the organization pledges it will not rush anyone.

"I think everyone, and our coaches included, understands that it's all a process," Hill said. "The goal every day is to try to get better, and to make players better and pitchers better, and there's no shortcuts. I think we understand our inventory and what we have here, and we're extremely excited about the ceilings and the talent that we have in camp. We're going to let it develop at its pace." 

Joe Frisaro has covered the Marlins for MLB.com since 2002. Follow him on Twitter @JoeFrisaro and listen to his podcast.

Miami Marlins

Campbell joins camp as non-roster invite

Straily puts arbitration ruling behind him
MLB.com @JoeFrisaro

JUPITER, Fla. -- An already crowded Spring Training roster for the Marlins grew by one more on Saturday. Eric Campbell, who played parts of three seasons with the Mets, has been added to big league camp as a non-roster invitee. Miami now has 69 players in camp.

The 30-year-old was with the Mets from 2014-16, and last year played 21 games in Japan for the Hanshin Tigers.

JUPITER, Fla. -- An already crowded Spring Training roster for the Marlins grew by one more on Saturday. Eric Campbell, who played parts of three seasons with the Mets, has been added to big league camp as a non-roster invitee. Miami now has 69 players in camp.

The 30-year-old was with the Mets from 2014-16, and last year played 21 games in Japan for the Hanshin Tigers.

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"It's good to have him in camp," manager Don Mattingly said. "I saw him a little bit with the Mets. He can play third and some first. He can hit the ball out of the ballpark. He's a guy we'll get to look at and see where he fits."

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Campbell had signed recently with the Marlins, but it was a strict Minor League contract without an invitation to big league camp. Now, when full-squad workouts begin on Monday at the Roger Dean Chevrolet Stadium complex, Campbell will be competing for a bench role.

The 6-foot-3, 215-pounder is a right-handed bat who can play first base. He will be in the mix with other non-roster invitee corner infielders, Jonathan Rodriguez and Yadiel Rivera.

Arbitration ruling behind Straily
The arbitration ruling handed down on Friday didn't go Dan Straily's way, but the right-hander has no hard feelings, and his focus is back to preparing for the upcoming season.

A three-person panel on Friday ruled in favor of the Marlins in their hearing with Straily, which took place on Thursday in Phoenix. Straily will make $3.375 million this year. He had filed at $3.55 million.

"Just because I didn't win my hearing doesn't mean there is any animosity towards my team," Straily said. "That doesn't exist, no matter what. I'm just kind of happy that it's over."

Video: Outlook: Straily could anchor Marlins rotation

The timing of the hearing is what bothered Straily because it disrupted his first couple of days of camp.

The Marlins opened Spring Training on Wednesday. That morning he threw off the mound, and then was excused to travel to Phoenix. He was back in uniform on Friday.

"I wish it would have been a few days earlier," Straily said. "I'm happy it's over, and I get to be with my team now, and leave the off-the-field stuff behind, and just be here, and work towards the common goal here.

"It could have been before camp started because that's two days I didn't get to spend with my teammates. Not that it's really like a distraction. It breaks up my chance to be with my guys the first two days. We're all anxious to get here. I came here for like five minutes and had to leave."

Worth noting
Saturday was a light workout day for the pitchers, who threw off the mound and went through pitchers' fielding drills. The first full-squad workouts begin on Monday, when pitchers will begin facing hitters.

Up next: The final day of strictly pitchers and catchers' workouts will be on Sunday at 9:30 a.m. ET at the Roger Dean Chevrolet Stadium complex. Practice is open to the public. 

Joe Frisaro has covered the Marlins for MLB.com since 2002. Follow him on Twitter @JoeFrisaro and listen to his podcast.

Miami Marlins, Eric Campbell, Dan Straily

Ozuna on Fernandez: I 'keep him in my heart'

Outfielder reports to Cardinals Spring Training, reflects on former teammate
MLB.com @JoeTrezz

JUPITER, Fla. -- Marcell Ozuna pushed open the doors of his new clubhouse Saturday, and with it, walked into a new future with St. Louis. Still, he couldn't help talk about the past. The wounds it left are still too tender, the painful tug of it too strong, especially back at the spring complex he once shared with Jose Fernandez.

The memory of the late Fernandez, whom Ozuna called his "best friend," will never leave the outfielder's mind. He looks to it for guidance, for support, when things seem dim or when he just needs to smile. Even last season, when Ozuna wove the loose edges of his tremendous talent into a full package of production, he found himself writing Fernandez's name in chalk and looking to the heavens for help.

JUPITER, Fla. -- Marcell Ozuna pushed open the doors of his new clubhouse Saturday, and with it, walked into a new future with St. Louis. Still, he couldn't help talk about the past. The wounds it left are still too tender, the painful tug of it too strong, especially back at the spring complex he once shared with Jose Fernandez.

The memory of the late Fernandez, whom Ozuna called his "best friend," will never leave the outfielder's mind. He looks to it for guidance, for support, when things seem dim or when he just needs to smile. Even last season, when Ozuna wove the loose edges of his tremendous talent into a full package of production, he found himself writing Fernandez's name in chalk and looking to the heavens for help.

"I talked to the sky: 'Brother are you there? Help me the most you can,'" said Ozuna. "Some days, you go inside [the clubhouse] and next to you would have been a guy you loved, that you spent time with, that was a friend. And you don't see him. That's hard. "You say, 'Come on, let's go. Give me the strength to play the game like you did before.'"

Fernandez famously wore a constant, infectious smile. The similar energy Ozuna brings was evident on his first day at Cardinals camp on Saturday, when he cracked jokes with reporters and cage tosses from coaches.

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A day before position players were required to report, the club's premier offseason acquisition held court in a corner of the clubhouse reserved for veterans. Rap music blasted for the first time this spring. Dexter Fowler -- who welcomed Ozuna to the team via FaceTime (a call that included Barry Bonds, who coached Ozuna in Miami, as well) over the winter -- offered one of many joyous bear hugs.

Shortly after the Cardinals traded three prospects to the Marlins for him in December, Ozuna was welcomed into a team group chat by Carlos Martinez. The two have known each other since the low Minors and have since bonded over similar experiences. Martinez (26) and Ozuna (27) are nearly the same age, come from the same country (Dominican Republic) and both have lost close teammates to tragic, sudden deaths. Martinez was especially close to late Cardinals outfielder Oscar Tavares, who died in a car accident in 2014 at age 22. Fernandez died in a boating accident off Miami in '16, at age 24. Both deaths rocked the baseball world.

Tweet from @Cardinals: No gloves needed! #CardsSpringTraining pic.twitter.com/BUG37sWahP

"I have fun and enjoy the game," Ozuna said. "After you lose your best friend, Jose Fernandez, it's hard. The only thing I put in my mind [last season] was, I don't want to have time to think. I am going to do my job and I'm going to keep him in my heart and have fun."

It's this emotional pivot that Ozuna credits, more than anything physical, for the rousing success he enjoyed in 2017. A National League All-Star for the second time, Ozuna blossomed into one of the top outfielders in baseball, hitting .312/.376/.548 with 37 home runs and 124 RBIs as part of the sport's most productive outfield units. Ozuna set career highs in almost every offensive category after a promising, if uneven, first four big league seasons.

Tweet from @Cardinals: Matheny���s thoughts on Ozuna���s professionalism and dedication. #CardsSpringTraining pic.twitter.com/dLu2fk8Rwi

"Its progression," Cardinals manager Mike Matheny said. "I'll be the first one to tell him, 'What you did isn't your ceiling. Don't let that be your ceiling.'"

Matheny slotted Ozuna in as his cleanup hitter before camp even opened. With two years left of team control, the Cardinals hope Ozuna anchors their lineup for more than the immediate future. Whatever that brings in St. Louis, the outfielder will bring the spirit of Fernandez along with him.

"I am never going to forget," he said. "I will take it with me the rest of my life."

Joe Trezza is a reporter for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter @joetrezz.

St. Louis Cardinals, Marcell Ozuna

Straily not sweating departures of Stanton, Yelich

MLB.com @JoeFrisaro

JUPITER, Fla. -- The Marlins are in the process of building an organization from the bottom up, and Dan Straily hopes to be an integral part of the process.

The 29-year-old right-hander has seen a similar blueprint work first-hand before, and he envisions that happening in Miami. Straily also made it clear that the young, restructured roster is not about to roll over, and he's not losing sleep over the former Marlins traded over the winter, especially those who lobbied for a trade.

JUPITER, Fla. -- The Marlins are in the process of building an organization from the bottom up, and Dan Straily hopes to be an integral part of the process.

The 29-year-old right-hander has seen a similar blueprint work first-hand before, and he envisions that happening in Miami. Straily also made it clear that the young, restructured roster is not about to roll over, and he's not losing sleep over the former Marlins traded over the winter, especially those who lobbied for a trade.

"I'm glad they're gone," Straily said in a not-so-veiled reference to Giancarlo Stanton and Christian Yelich. "If they don't want to be here, then good for them. Then, they can continue their career elsewhere.

"I got it. It's not like I was upset or insulted. It's no secret our starting rotation last year, we didn't exactly carry the team around. I get that. That was pretty much the talk of it. As a guy who is in the rotation, it motivated me when I hear that kind of stuff to continue to really focus on bettering my game."

Straily has been on the go since the Marlins opened Spring Training on Wednesday at the Roger Dean Chevrolet Stadium complex. He threw a bullpen session that morning, then was excused from camp to attend his arbitration hearing in Phoenix.

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A source confirmed to MLB.com that Straily lost his case and will make $3.375 million in 2018. He had filed at $3.55 million. The hearing was on Thursday, and Straily was back with the club on Friday.

Now that the hearing is over, Straily is focused on the season. And he made it clear: He is ready to lead by performance and example.

"I'm excited to be here with some younger guys and finally get a chance to really kind of mentor and try to help guys come into the big leagues for the first time," Straily said. "It's something I really enjoyed in Cincinnati. I enjoy that role."

Straily also knows a thing or two about teams that shock the world. He began his career in Oakland and was part of the 2012 club that improved by 20 games to win the American League West before winning the division again in '13. He also pitched for the 2015 Astros, who improved by 16 games and won the AL Wild Card Game. After being acquired from the Reds in '17, Straily enters his second season with the Marlins. He went 10-9 with a 4.26 ERA, pacing the team in innings (181 2/3). Straily is ready to take on a leadership role for a rotation that promises to have many new faces over the course of the season.

The Marlins made unpopular moves in the offseason, trading Stanton, Dee Gordon, Marcell Ozuna and Yelich.

Since last year, the organization has brought in more than 20 prospects.

"I really, I guess, kind of agree with what happened," Straily said. "All the moves they've made. I really feel the pieces they've brought in, this might flip around a little quicker.

"I'm not saying like today, but this might flip around quicker than a lot of people realize because of some of the players they were able to acquire back in those trades."

Video: MIA@PHI: Straily K's 10 over six strong innings

Manager Don Mattingly said it's important to have the players on board for the process the organization is going through.

"It's good," Mattingly said. "I think, for all of us, from an organizational standpoint, you really want it from the guy helping you out at the door, the guy selling tickets to the top, all the way through our organization. You want people that are here to build a championship mentality, and a championship model that the people of South Florida are going to be proud of. Obviously, you want your players to feel that way."

Straily certainly does, and he believes his team will surprise a lot of people.

"I don't think it's a race to the bottom," he said. "No one that comes through this room will happily be willing to lose a baseball game. That's just not how it works in this room."

Joe Frisaro has covered the Marlins for MLB.com since 2002. Follow him on Twitter @JoeFrisaro and listen to his podcast.

Miami Marlins, Dan Straily

Marlins likely to carry extra pitcher on staff

MLB.com @JoeFrisaro

JUPITER, Fla. -- Carrying 13 pitchers worked well for the Marlins in 2017, and there's a strong possibility the club will enter the season with an extra pitcher yet again.

Because so much can change before setting the Opening Day roster, the club isn't officially declaring it will go with eight relievers. But it's highly likely, barring something unforeseen.

JUPITER, Fla. -- Carrying 13 pitchers worked well for the Marlins in 2017, and there's a strong possibility the club will enter the season with an extra pitcher yet again.

Because so much can change before setting the Opening Day roster, the club isn't officially declaring it will go with eight relievers. But it's highly likely, barring something unforeseen.

The tentative plan of five starters and eight relievers became more accepted throughout the big leagues last year, but it was a change from 2016, when the Marlins went with 13 position players and 12 pitchers.

"I'd say that would be our original plan and where we start," Marlins manager Don Mattingly said. "And try to build versatile players who play multiple positions. With the state of pitching and bullpens, and how much you go to them and how quickly you go to them, 13 seems to be the norm now, more than the exception."

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At this point, the Marlins have two rock solid starters in their rotation: Dan Straily and Jose Urena. The other three spots are up in the air.

It's a deep pool of candidates, which includes lefty Jarlin Garcia, who is converting from the bullpen to the rotation. Last season, Garcia paced the club in appearances with 68.

But there is no guarantee Garcia will make the Opening Day rotation. He will have to earn his place as he builds up his innings.

One thing the Marlins aren't contemplating is going with a six-man rotation. At least one club, the Angels, are doing that to help acclimate Shohei Ohtani.

"There's been no talk of that," Mattingly said. "We're at a five-man rotation."

Tweet from @Marlins: Time to get to work. ������#MarlinsST pic.twitter.com/0DdiCTstPV

All in for pace of play
The concept of picking up the pace of play is perfectly fine with Mattingly. The question the club has is what specific measures may eventually be put into place in an attempt to speed up games.

MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred has the authority to implement rules, such as a pitch clock, to speed up times of games. Those changes may be adopted for Spring Training contests.

Like all clubs, the Marlins are waiting to see what guidelines they will be going with at some point in Grapefruit League action.

"I'm all for pace of play, for sure," Mattingly said. "There's a lot of things we can do to quicken the pace. I think from the fans' point of view, it's action. Let's keep this thing moving. It can be a 2-1 game, but it's action."

There's talk of instituting a pitch clock or enforcing more strict rules that require hitters to keep at least one foot in the box between pitches.

Mattingly is for ways to get players moving quicker on and off the field after innings.

"Let's get on the field, let's get off the field," Mattingly said. "Let's keep hitters in the box. We don't need to be walking around the mound all day. Let's keep the game going at a pace that everyone enjoys. That doesn't mean that we have to go so fast to speed up the time. If we keep the pace going, it's more action, fans are more involved. It's just a better game."

Video: Don Mattingly discusses improving the pace of play

Worth noting

• In the offseason, Straily was briefly mentioned in trade discussions. The Orioles were among the teams that expressed interest. But Miami intends to retain Straily, and the right-hander is fully committed to being part of the building process.

"I want to be here," Straily said. "I want to win here. I want to grow as an organization here. You can't give your best to your teammates and your team and everything that's involved if you're constantly thinking about and worried about if you're going to get traded."

• Sharif Othman, a non-roster invitee, sustained a fluke injury while catching a bullpen session on Friday morning. While receiving a pitch, Othman dislocated his left shoulder and was carted to the clubhouse for treatment.

Up next: Pitchers and catchers workouts resume at 9:30 a.m. ET on Saturday at the Roger Dean Chevrolet Stadium Complex. Practices are open to the public.

Joe Frisaro has covered the Marlins for MLB.com since 2002. Follow him on Twitter @JoeFrisaro and listen to his podcast.

Miami Marlins

Marlins handling talented Alcantara with care

22-year-old fireballer was acquired in trade for Ozuna
MLB.com @JoeFrisaro

JUPITER, Fla. -- Watching Sandy Alcantara throw off the mound just once is all the Marlins needed to see they have a potential ace. But at this stage, Miami's staff also recognizes the importance of handling the 22-year-old's development with care.

So, if there are any questions as to whether the rangy right-hander (he's listed at 6-foot-4, 170 pounds) with an upper-90s fastball is completely ready to be a fixture in the rotation, Alcantara may open the season at either Triple-A New Orleans or Double-A Jacksonville. His performance in Spring Training ultimately will decide.

JUPITER, Fla. -- Watching Sandy Alcantara throw off the mound just once is all the Marlins needed to see they have a potential ace. But at this stage, Miami's staff also recognizes the importance of handling the 22-year-old's development with care.

So, if there are any questions as to whether the rangy right-hander (he's listed at 6-foot-4, 170 pounds) with an upper-90s fastball is completely ready to be a fixture in the rotation, Alcantara may open the season at either Triple-A New Orleans or Double-A Jacksonville. His performance in Spring Training ultimately will decide.

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"That's the one thing you never want to get away from," manager Don Mattingly said. "You know there is opportunity here, and you know there's a guy with a lot of talent. But you want him to be good for a long time. So you worry about development first, and for him to be prepared to have success."

Alcantara is the Marlins' No. 3 prospect, according to MLB Pipeline. The Dominican native was a centerpiece in the Marcell Ozuna trade with the Cardinals. He debuted as a September callup with St. Louis last year, tossing 8 1/3 innings of relief.

"I was able to pitch in September in the big leagues," Alcantara said in Spanish. "I've got to work at it to get back up here and take advantage whenever they give me the ball."

Video: STL@CHC: Alcantara K's Happ to strike out the side

Alcantara's first bullpen session was on Wednesday, Miami's first day of Spring Training, and he's expected back on the mound on Friday. Alcantara's four-seam fastball averaged 98.21 mph last year, well above the MLB average of 93.21 mph. The Marlins envision him as a starter, and if he can command his breaking pitches, he projects as a top-of-the-rotation-type talent.

"The experiences I got from last year told me I need to keep working on my breaking pitches, the command on my breaking pitches," Alcantara said. "And I've got to attack the hitters with my fastball."

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Mattingly says the only two locks for the Marlins' rotation are Dan Straily and Jose Urena, though a third spot also could be relatively secure: Mattingly noted on Thursday that left-hander Jarlin Garcia, who pitched in relief last year, is being stretched out to start. Alcantara is one of about 10 candidates to fill out the rotation.

Pitching coach Juan Nieves studied video of Alcantara in the offseason, and early in camp, he will be monitoring each throwing session. But there won't be any rush to push Alcantara if he's not completely ready.

"I think we're in a situation where we must not have to speed up any processes," Nieves said. "It takes time."

The Marlins learned the hard way a few years ago with Brad Hand, who ran out of options and was let go. The Padres picked him up, and the left-hander became an All-Star closer last year.

"When you speed up guys to the big leagues, you pay the consequences either way," Nieves said. "Either guys that leave, because options are out, or guys who don't grow in the big leagues and aren't able to stay or become solid players or pitchers in the big leagues. So, we're going to try. I'm sure everything will be on time."

Joe Frisaro has covered the Marlins for MLB.com since 2002. Follow him on Twitter @JoeFrisaro and listen to his podcast.

Miami Marlins, Sandy Alcantara

Marlins among 15 teams at Lincecum's workout

Two-time NL Cy Young Award winner eyeing 2018 comeback
MLB.com @JoeFrisaro

JUPITER, Fla. -- The Marlins were among the reported 15 teams, represented by 20 scouts, that attended Tim Lincecum's workout on Thursday at the Driveline Baseball facility in Kent, Wash.

Miami is exploring all options, and Lincecum, who won two National League Cy Young Awards while playing for the Giants, could be a possibility.

JUPITER, Fla. -- The Marlins were among the reported 15 teams, represented by 20 scouts, that attended Tim Lincecum's workout on Thursday at the Driveline Baseball facility in Kent, Wash.

Miami is exploring all options, and Lincecum, who won two National League Cy Young Awards while playing for the Giants, could be a possibility.

Earlier Thursday, Marlins president of baseball operations Michael Hill told reporters at MLB's Spring Training Media Day that the team is "looking for ways to improve our talent pool."

"I mentioned at our FanFest [last Saturday] that we're exploring to see if there might be any last-minute bargains, and I would say we're still in that process," Hill said. "No decisions have been made, but we're monitoring the market to see if there's anything that makes sense."

Lincecum back? Righty hits 93 mph for scouts

Lincecum is making a comeback attempt after not playing in the Majors in 2017. Reportedly, the 33-year-old's fastball was between 90-93 mph. The right-hander last pitched in a big league game while with the Angels in '16.

Lincecum won the NL Cy Young in 2008 and '09. He underwent hip surgery in 2015.

Video: Alexa, Feinsand on Lincecum attempting a comeback

In the first two days of Spring Training, Marlins manager Don Mattingly said the only locks to make the rotation are Dan Straily and Jose Urena. Left-hander Jarlin Garcia is a strong possibility after the club announced he is being switched from a reliever to a starter.

The Marlins are also in the market for an experienced outfielder to assist in the development of prospects Lewis Brinson and Magneuris Sierra. Brinson and Sierra project to be big parts of the Marlins' future. If either isn't ready to be with the club on Opening Day, Miami would like to have at least another experienced veteran.

Melky Cabrera and Jon Jay are possibilities, while it's unlikely the Marlins will seriously pursue Jose Bautista.

Miami is seeking an outfielder who is versatile enough to play center and a corner spot.

Joe Frisaro has covered the Marlins for MLB.com since 2002. He writes a blog, called The Fish Pond. Follow him on Twitter @JoeFrisaro.

Miami Marlins, Tim Lincecum