Globe iconLogin iconRecap iconSearch iconTickets icon

news

MLB News

Home of Hammerin' Hank

The Hall of Fame Tour is a natural fit in Milwaukee, where one of baseball's greatest players got his start
MLB.com

Are you looking for something to do to celebrate Hall of Fame Induction Weekend but can't make the trip to Cooperstown? Well, what if Cooperstown could come to you? MLB's Hall of Fame Tour offers fans across the United States the chance to immerse themselves in the baseball history like never before. The state-of-the-art exhibit features one-of-a-kind 3D technology, interactive games and displays, and plenty of artifacts from Cooperstown's collection.

It's fitting that Milwaukee, Wis., is the second stop on MLB's Hall of Fame Tour; the showcase comes to Miller Park from July 15-31. Before the Milwaukee Brewers got their namesake, they were known as the Braves, and in 1954, the Milwaukee Braves called up a little-known rookie from Mobile, Ala., who tallied an unassuming 13 homers in his first 122 games. In the 21 years that followed, though, Hank Aaron would average 34 homers per season and 755 in total, en route to becoming possibly the greatest player to ever step on a baseball field.

Are you looking for something to do to celebrate Hall of Fame Induction Weekend but can't make the trip to Cooperstown? Well, what if Cooperstown could come to you? MLB's Hall of Fame Tour offers fans across the United States the chance to immerse themselves in the baseball history like never before. The state-of-the-art exhibit features one-of-a-kind 3D technology, interactive games and displays, and plenty of artifacts from Cooperstown's collection.

It's fitting that Milwaukee, Wis., is the second stop on MLB's Hall of Fame Tour; the showcase comes to Miller Park from July 15-31. Before the Milwaukee Brewers got their namesake, they were known as the Braves, and in 1954, the Milwaukee Braves called up a little-known rookie from Mobile, Ala., who tallied an unassuming 13 homers in his first 122 games. In the 21 years that followed, though, Hank Aaron would average 34 homers per season and 755 in total, en route to becoming possibly the greatest player to ever step on a baseball field.

Although Aaron no longer patrols the outfield, his legend lives on, and you can view a relic from his career in person; displayed on the Tour is the ball hit by Hammerin' Hank for his 714th home run, matching the record held by Babe Ruth.

Video: ATL@CIN: Hank Aaron hits homer 714, tying Babe Ruth

Not to be overlooked by any stretch, the Brewers boast a few impressive Hall of Famers themselves: Rollie Fingers, Don Sutton, Robin Yount and Paul Molitor all have plaques in Cooperstown. "[Yount] could do everything. He never stopped hustling," famed Brewers broadcaster Bob Uecker once said. "He was what a ballplayer is supposed to be."

Milwaukee has a rich baseball history, and its best alumni, along with those from all other 29 Major League teams, are celebrated on the Hall of Fame Tour.