Globe iconLogin iconRecap iconSearch iconTickets icon
news

MLB News

Most Likely to Throw a No Hitter

Well, week one of the MLB season is in the books and each team has finished off their first series of the year. For my Atlanta Braves, it wasn’t quite the start I was hoping for. Still, I feel a lot better with the 7-5 score than I did after six innings on Sunday, when the Braves had yet to register a hit against Mets starter Jonathon Niese. Thankfully, Freddie Freeman smoked a single to right field to end that nightmare. But shortly thereafter I realized history could still be made on Easter Sunday as I shifted my attention to the screen showing Orioles’ starter Jason Hammel mowing down Lindsay Guentzel’s Twins. However, it was not to be for the Baltimore hurler, as Justin Morneau broke up his bid in the eighth inning. Still, these stellar starts got me thinking. Which pitcher is most likely to throw a no-hitter this season?

Of course, it’s easy to go with the guys many would consider the two most dominant pitchers in the league: Roy Halladay and Justin Verlander. But c’mon, they win everything and they already have multiple no-nos, so I’m cutting them off my list. And any time Verlander gets close, the right thing to do is drop down a bunt—right Erick Aybar? Other popular picks might be the young guns such as Stephen Strasburg or Jeremy Hellickson—picks I could never fault you for, because they are both great pitchers. But I’ll do you a favor and let you know who the correct answer is.

The pitcher that is most likely to throw a no-hitter this season is the defending National League Cy Young Award winner, Clayton Kershaw. There is no denying the kid has dynamite stuff, as well as a scary combination of youth and experience. Despite the fact that he is only 24 years old, he is beginning his fifth season as a starter in the big leagues. He has led the NL in Batting Average Against for two of the last three seasons and also led in strikeouts and WHIP last year. Additionally, he’s been going deeper into games each season, including 2 complete-game shutouts in 2011.

Not convinced? Take the following into account:

-A left-handed starter has thrown a no-hitter in each of the last five seasons, while the streak for right-handers stands at just two years in a row.

-The last two no-hitters in the National League (prior to the two thrown by Halladay) were thrown by pitchers in the NL West.

Okay, I know you think I’m way off, so what is your opinion? Tweet me at @SkippinsYNN and @MLBFanCave.

Well, week one of the MLB season is in the books and each team has finished off their first series of the year. For my Atlanta Braves, it wasn’t quite the start I was hoping for. Still, I feel a lot better with the 7-5 score than I did after six innings on Sunday, when the Braves had yet to register a hit against Mets starter Jonathon Niese. Thankfully, Freddie Freeman smoked a single to right field to end that nightmare. But shortly thereafter I realized history could still be made on Easter Sunday as I shifted my attention to the screen showing Orioles’ starter Jason Hammel mowing down Lindsay Guentzel’s Twins. However, it was not to be for the Baltimore hurler, as Justin Morneau broke up his bid in the eighth inning. Still, these stellar starts got me thinking. Which pitcher is most likely to throw a no-hitter this season?

Of course, it’s easy to go with the guys many would consider the two most dominant pitchers in the league: Roy Halladay and Justin Verlander. But c’mon, they win everything and they already have multiple no-nos, so I’m cutting them off my list. And any time Verlander gets close, the right thing to do is drop down a bunt—right Erick Aybar? Other popular picks might be the young guns such as Stephen Strasburg or Jeremy Hellickson—picks I could never fault you for, because they are both great pitchers. But I’ll do you a favor and let you know who the correct answer is.

The pitcher that is most likely to throw a no-hitter this season is the defending National League Cy Young Award winner, Clayton Kershaw. There is no denying the kid has dynamite stuff, as well as a scary combination of youth and experience. Despite the fact that he is only 24 years old, he is beginning his fifth season as a starter in the big leagues. He has led the NL in Batting Average Against for two of the last three seasons and also led in strikeouts and WHIP last year. Additionally, he’s been going deeper into games each season, including 2 complete-game shutouts in 2011.

Not convinced? Take the following into account:

-A left-handed starter has thrown a no-hitter in each of the last five seasons, while the streak for right-handers stands at just two years in a row.

-The last two no-hitters in the National League (prior to the two thrown by Halladay) were thrown by pitchers in the NL West.

Okay, I know you think I’m way off, so what is your opinion? Tweet me at @SkippinsYNN and @MLBFanCave.