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ASTROS
JEFF BAGWELL
Spent his entire 15-year career with the Houston Astros, winning NL Rookie of the Year in 1991 and NL MVP in 1994.
 
CRAIG BIGGIO
Played all 20 years of his career in Houston and is the franchise leader in nearly every offensive category, including hits (3,060), runs, doubles and games played.


BRAVES
CHIPPER JONES
Won an NL MVP award, gained eight All-Star selections, captured a batting title and was part of 14 teams that advanced to the postseason during his 19-year career with the Atlanta Braves.

ASTROS
JEFF BAGWELL
Spent his entire 15-year career with the Houston Astros, winning NL Rookie of the Year in 1991 and NL MVP in 1994.
 
CRAIG BIGGIO
Played all 20 years of his career in Houston and is the franchise leader in nearly every offensive category, including hits (3,060), runs, doubles and games played.


BRAVES
CHIPPER JONES
Won an NL MVP award, gained eight All-Star selections, captured a batting title and was part of 14 teams that advanced to the postseason during his 19-year career with the Atlanta Braves.


BREWERS
Robin Yount

CARDINALS
STAN MUSIAL
Stan the Man spent his entire 22-year career in St. Louis, where he set franchise records for games played (3,026), runs (1,949), hits (3,630), doubles (725), triples (177), home runs (475) and RBIs (1,951), while also helping lead the Cardinals to three World Series Championships.

Bob Gibson


CUBS
ERNIE BANKS
Mr. Cub played on the North Side from 1953-71, and hit 512 home runs, drove in 1,636 runs, batted .274, and was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1977.


DODGERS
JACKIE ROBINSON
Broke the Major League Baseball color barrier with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1947 and never played for another big-league organization during his 10-year career. His uniform number (42) has been retired across the Majors since 1997. It's the only such honor in all of sports.

SANDY KOUFAX
In his prime, no one was better than Koufax, who won three pitching triple crowns, tossed four no-hitters and was twice named World Series MVP in a 12-year career with the Dodgers. He retired at the age of 30.

Peewee Reese


GIANTS
Carl Hubbell
Travis Jackson
Mel Ott

INDIANS
BOB FELLER
After debuting as a 17-year-old phenom in 1936, Rapid Robert spent 18 seasons with Cleveland, winning 266 games and earning a place in the Hall of Fame. His only break from the Tribe was to serve his country in World War II.

Bob Lemon


MARINERS
EDGAR MARTINEZ
Earned seven All-Star berths and two American League batting titles while playing all 18 of his Major League seasons with the Seattle Mariners.

NATIONALS
Walter Johnson

ORIOLES
Jim Palmer
Cal Ripken
Brooks Robinson


PADRES
Tony Gwynn


PHILLIES
MIKE SCHMIDT
The three-time NL MVP played his entire 18-year career with the Philadelphia Phillies and must be included in any conversation about the best third basemen in MLB history.


PIRATES
ROBERTO CLEMENTE
The prototypical right fielder was a career .317 hitter in 18 seasons with the Pittsburgh Pirates. A great humanitarian, Clemente died in plane crash en route to delivering aid to earthquake victims in Nicaragua
 
WILLIE STARGELL
Known as "Pops," Stargell led the Pittsburgh Pirates to two World Series championships and hit 475 homers in a 21-year career.

Bill Mazeroski
Pie Traynor

REDS
BARRY LARKIN
A native of Cincinnati, Larkin played 19 seasons for his hometown Reds, leading the Reds to the World Series championship in 1990 and winning the NL MVP award in 1995.
 
JOHNNY BENCH
Arguably the most complete catcher of all time, Bench was a 14-time All-star who helped the Cincinnati Reds win two World Series championships, including 1976 when he was named World Series MVP.


RED SOX
TED WILLIAMS
Teddy Ballgame hit .344 for his career and is last player to hit .400 in a season. Arguably the greatest hitter of all time, Williams won six AL batting titles and the Triple Crown in 1942 and 1947.

Jim Rice
Carl Yastrzemski

ROCKIES
Todd Helton

ROYALS

George Brett

TIGERS

Charlie Gehringer
Al Kaline


TWINS
KIRBY PUCKETT
Spent his entire 12-year career with the Minnesota Twins and was a 10-time All-Star before being inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2001.


WHITE SOX
LUKE APPLING
Known as 'Old Aches and Pains,' Appling played with the White Sox from 1930-1950 (minus the 1944 season for military service). He finished with 2,749 hits, 1,116 RBIs and 1,319 runs scored. The .310 career hitter had his No. 4 retired by the White Sox in 1975, and was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1964.

Red Faber
Ted Lyons

YANKEES

Bill Dickey

Whitey Ford

Lou Gehrig

Mickey Mantle

Mariano Rivera

Bernie Williams