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Where the Crew's bats stand after 50 games

Brewers shut out for first time in 2019; Gonzalez allows 3 runs in 1st
@AdamMcCalvy
May 22, 2019

MILWAUKEE -- Tuesday marked the 50th game of the 50th season since the Brewers’ move to Milwaukee, although a 3-0 loss to the Reds was not exactly one for the history books. Gio Gonzalez settled in after allowing the game’s only three runs in the first inning, but the Brewers’

MILWAUKEE -- Tuesday marked the 50th game of the 50th season since the Brewers’ move to Milwaukee, although a 3-0 loss to the Reds was not exactly one for the history books.

Gio Gonzalez settled in after allowing the game’s only three runs in the first inning, but the Brewers’ offense, minus Major League home run leader Christian Yelich, who was scratched from the starting lineup with back spasms, was held scoreless for the first time this season by Sonny Gray and three Reds relievers in a six-hit shutout. It was the farthest the Brewers had gone into a season without being shut out since 2007, when it also happened in game No. 50.

That leaves the the Yankees as the only team in MLB yet to be blanked this season.

Box score

“We’re good,” Brewers third baseman Mike Moustakas said. “When we’re clicking, we can score a lot of runs really quick. And when we’re not, we’ve got guys one through nine who are capable of carrying us at any point and driving some runs in. It hurts not having Travis [Shaw] here, and Yeli getting a little banged up today, obviously that’s not what you want.

“We’re only 50 games in. We’ve got 112 left. A lot of baseball left. We’re in a good spot and we like where we’re at. Just go out there and keep playing, keep grinding it out, and we’ll be where we want to be at the end of the season.”

The Brewers are 28-22 through 50 games, a 90-win pace.

Gonzalez allowed more runs in the first inning then he’d yielded in any of his first four starts since signing with the Brewers in mid-April, and that was good enough for Gray and Reds relievers David Hernandez, Amir Garrett and Raisel Iglesias. The Brewers managed five hits and four walks in six innings against Gray but never cashed in, going 0-for-6 against him with runners in scoring position.

That explains how the Reds managed only one hit off Brewers pitchers from innings two through nine -- and won handily.

“I thought in the first inning, we had a shot at Sonny,” said Brewers manager Craig Counsell, referring to a threat that began with Lorenzo Cain’s leadoff double. “He was a little scattered in the strike zone. He got better as the game went on.”

Fifty games in, the Brewers’ offense is average to slightly above average so far. The group ranks eighth of 15 National League teams with 4.78 runs per game, seventh with a .247 batting average, sixth with a .324 Weighted On-base Average and a .428 slugging percentage and fifth with a .331 on-base percentage.

Counsell raved about the offense after winning three out of four last week in Philadelphia, and he was pleased with the fight in a 12-8 loss to the Braves on Friday night in Atlanta. In the three games since, the Brewers have scored six total runs, including Tuesday’s shutout coming off a well-earned off day.

Two of the Brewers’ hits came from rookie Keston Hiura in his Miller Park debut, a broken-bat infield single in the sixth and a clean single to left field leading off the ninth. They followed strikeouts his first two times up on fastballs above the strike zone, including with a runner at second base in the fourth inning.

“That’s a day you tip your cap to Sonny,” Moustakas said. “He did a great job commanding the zone, and even when he did get a little erratic, he was able to come back and make a pitch when he needed to.”

Like Gray, Gonzalez got better as the game went on. But in that opening frame, Reds rookie Nick Senzel roped a leadoff triple to left-center field as the first of seven Cincinnati batters in an inning that included a run-scoring wild pitch and RBIs for Phillip Ervin and Kyle Farmer, giving the Reds a 3-0 lead before the Brewers came to bat.

“I put us in a tough situation after that first inning,” Gonzalez said. “They caught me on my heels that first inning; they were real aggressive right away. After that, our game plan changed a little bit.”

How does Gonzalez like the Brewers at the 50-game mark?

“We do a great job in-house, in the clubhouse, which is great,” he said. “I love the way they’re doing it. ‘Hey, tomorrow is another day to fight.’ That’s one thing you can appreciate about those guys. They hold their head up high every time, and that’s what you want.”

Adam McCalvy has covered the Brewers for MLB.com since 2001. Follow him on Twitter and Instagram and like him on Facebook.