Globe iconLogin iconRecap iconSearch iconTickets icon
news

MLB News

Was Suzuki's inside-the-parker just a homer?

MLB.com

SAN DIEGO -- Twins manager Ron Gardenhire had more time to reflect on Kurt Suzuki's unusual inside-the-park homer in Tuesday's 5-3 win over the Padres, and said he believes the ball cleared the left-field wall for a traditional homer.

Suzuki hit a deep drive to left field that appeared to go over the fence and back onto the playing field but it was never ruled a homer by the umpires on the field, and Suzuki kept running around the bases for an inside-the-park homer.

View Full Game Coverage

SAN DIEGO -- Twins manager Ron Gardenhire had more time to reflect on Kurt Suzuki's unusual inside-the-park homer in Tuesday's 5-3 win over the Padres, and said he believes the ball cleared the left-field wall for a traditional homer.

Suzuki hit a deep drive to left field that appeared to go over the fence and back onto the playing field but it was never ruled a homer by the umpires on the field, and Suzuki kept running around the bases for an inside-the-park homer.

View Full Game Coverage

Gardenhire said he believed the ball cleared the fence but didn't want to challenge the ruling for fear it could've been ruled fan interference and changed to a double. So he left it as an inside-the-park home run because it counts the same for Suzuki.

"Suzuki can run but that wasn't really an inside-the-park home run," Gardenhire said. "That was an over-the-fence home run that hit a fan and everybody quit playing but him. So call it what you want. I just didn't want to challenge it because I didn't want it ruled as fan interference."

Suzuki was fine with the decision not to challenge the play, as it gave him his first career inside-the-park home run at any level.

"It's cooler to have an inside-the-parker," Suzuki said with a laugh.

It also officially went down as the first inside-the-park homer for the Twins since Joe Mauer did it against the Angels at the Metrodome since July 21, 2007. Suzuki joked it was cool to be a part of that club with Mauer, who was also a catcher when he hit his.

"Me and Joe were talking about it," Suzuki said. "Athletes out there, you know."

Rhett Bollinger is a reporter for MLB.com. Read his blog, Bollinger Beat, and follow him on Twitter @

Minnesota Twins, Kurt Suzuki