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D-backs refocus at Meetings after busy month

Front office gathered intel, will look to fill holes in CF, infield, bullpen in coming weeks
MLB.com @SteveGilbertMLB

LAS VEGAS -- It was a quiet week for the D-backs at the Winter Meetings when it came to news, but behind the scenes, there was plenty of dialogue with both teams and agents.

That was what Arizona GM Mike Hazen expected, because the trade of Paul Goldschmidt last week had dominated his staff's time.

LAS VEGAS -- It was a quiet week for the D-backs at the Winter Meetings when it came to news, but behind the scenes, there was plenty of dialogue with both teams and agents.

That was what Arizona GM Mike Hazen expected, because the trade of Paul Goldschmidt last week had dominated his staff's time.

• Hazen: Full rebuild not in the works for D-backs

"There was probably going to be a little lull for us, because we kind of wanted to step back anyway," Hazen said. "We focused so much of our time and energy in this offseason on the Goldschmidt trade -- pretty much every waking minute on it for the last two months.

"We've paid attention to other things and obviously had some conversations around other things, but other areas of our roster that teams have interest in, or that we might want to add, we didn't spend a lot of time on that stuff. So, this gave us this opportunity to do that. That's what we focused this week on."

Video: Lovullo on trusting Hazen's vision for future of team

BIGGEST REMAINING NEEDS
1. CF:
With the expected departure of free agent A.J. Pollock, the D-backs will need to find a replacement. It's possible that could be second baseman Ketel Marte moving to center, which would then open another hole in the infield.

• Hot Stove Tracker

2. 1B/2B: If Marte moves to center, Eduardo Escobar likely would play second. That means Jake Lamb would need to stay at third and the D-backs would need to find a first baseman to replace Goldschmidt. Or, the D-backs could move Lamb to first, play Escobar at third and look to acquire a second baseman.

• Lovullo talks 2019 vision, roles for new players

3. Bullpen: The D-backs are not necessarily looking for a closer, but aren't opposed to picking one up, either. By not anointing a closer now, the D-backs are following their playbook from 2017 when leaving that role open allowed them to sign Fernando Rodney later in the offseason, because they were one of the few teams that could offer him the closer's job. Either way, they'd like to add some depth to the back of the bullpen.

Video: Gilbert on who might be the new face of the D-backs

RULE 5 DRAFT
The D-backs selected right-hander Nick Green in the Major League phase of the Draft and see him as a longshot candidate to make the bullpen.

In the Triple-A phase of the Draft, the D-backs picked outfielder Jeffrey Baez from the Giants organization, and they lost right-hander Jason Creasy to the Braves and right-hander Cristofer Ogando to the Rays.

GM'S BOTTOM LINE
"I think it was active in terms of our ability to gather information about things, where things stand both on the free-agent and trade markets, which I think serves us well heading home. We have a number of irons in the fire right now. Nothing really overly close, but at least things for us to think about and consider." -- Hazen

Steve Gilbert has covered the D-backs for MLB.com since 2001. Follow him on Twitter @SteveGilbertMLB.

Arizona Diamondbacks

D-backs grab pitcher Green in Rule 5 Draft

MLB.com @SteveGilbertMLB

LAS VEGAS -- In previous trade talks with the Yankees, right-hander Nick Green's name came up. But nothing ever came of it until Thursday, when the D-backs selected the 23-year-old in the Major League portion of the Rule 5 Draft.

The D-backs must pay $100,000 to the Yankees as compensation for selecting Green, and Arizona has to keep him on its 25-man roster throughout the 2019 season. If the D-backs elect not to keep him on the roster, they must offer him back to the Yankees for $50,000. They can also work out a trade with the Yankees for Green which would allow Arizona to option him to the Minor Leagues.

LAS VEGAS -- In previous trade talks with the Yankees, right-hander Nick Green's name came up. But nothing ever came of it until Thursday, when the D-backs selected the 23-year-old in the Major League portion of the Rule 5 Draft.

The D-backs must pay $100,000 to the Yankees as compensation for selecting Green, and Arizona has to keep him on its 25-man roster throughout the 2019 season. If the D-backs elect not to keep him on the roster, they must offer him back to the Yankees for $50,000. They can also work out a trade with the Yankees for Green which would allow Arizona to option him to the Minor Leagues.

Green spent most of last season with the Yankee's Class A Advanced team in Tampa, compiling a 3.28 ERA and 7.3 strikeouts per nine innings in 20 starts. He did make three starts for Double-A Trenton, where he went 1-2 with a 3.63 ERA and 4.7 strikeouts per nine.

"He's got a good cutter, good curveball, he's up to 93-94 [mph]," D-backs GM Mike Hazen said. "We've liked him in trade discussions in the past. It's a little bit of a flier, given that he only has three starts in Double-A, but he's going to be 24 years old [in March] and we like a lot of things that he can do."

While Green was almost strictly a starter in the Minor Leagues, if he sticks with the D-backs in the 2019 season, it will almost certainly be in a bullpen role.

Steve Gilbert has covered the D-backs for MLB.com since 2001. Follow him on Twitter @SteveGilbertMLB.

Arizona Diamondbacks, Nick Green

Hazen: Full rebuild not in the works for D-backs

GM says he'll be creative to keep club competitive
MLB.com @SteveGilbertMLB

LAS VEGAS -- D-backs GM Mike Hazen knows that after the trade of a franchise-player like Paul Goldschmidt, the expectation was that his team was going to undergo a full rebuild.

That may happen at some point in the future, but as Hazen has explained to his colleagues at the Winter Meetings, he has no intention of doing that right now.

LAS VEGAS -- D-backs GM Mike Hazen knows that after the trade of a franchise-player like Paul Goldschmidt, the expectation was that his team was going to undergo a full rebuild.

That may happen at some point in the future, but as Hazen has explained to his colleagues at the Winter Meetings, he has no intention of doing that right now.

Instead, the D-backs will attempt the difficult challenge of retooling while still trying to remain competitive.

"One, I think it's tricky to do that," Hazen said of undertaking a complete rebuild like the Cubs and Astros did recently. "I think it's a risky strategy. I just don't think our Draft is built the way other games' drafts are. There's a long development process."

Hot Stove news, rumors

When Theo Epstein took over the Cubs and Jeff Luhnow assumed the GM duties of the Astros, the Major League teams were not good.

In Arizona, though, the D-backs believe that even without Goldschmidt, Patrick Corbin and A.J. Pollock, who is likely to depart via free agency, they still have a good core.

Left fielder David Peralta has been an above-average performer, Jake Lamb has one All-Star Game to his name already, Nick Ahmed is an elite defender at short and improved at the plate last season. There's Ketel Marte and Eduardo Escobar, and the team expects Steven Souza Jr. to be a bigger contributor in 2019 since he will be past the shoulder woes of last year.

In Zack Greinke and Robbie Ray, the D-backs have a good top-of-the-rotation, and reliever Archie Bradley has the stuff to be as dominant as he was in 2017.

So rather than use the Astros or Cubs as role models, the D-backs will look to the Brewers as an example. Milwaukee won the National League Central in 2011 and, after falling off a bit, rebuilt without completely bottoming out, once again winning the NL Central in 2018.

Hazen will try to get creative and use some combination of Escobar, Lamb, Marte and a free-agent or trade acquisition to fill the holes left by Goldschmidt and Pollock. He's already added to the depth in the rotation with the acquisition of Luke Weaver and the signing of Merrill Kelly.

Meanwhile, the team will continue to try to build out its farm system. Pitchers like Jon Duplantier, Taylor Widener and Taylor Clarke are knocking on the door to the big leagues and the position-player group that includes shortstop Jazz Chisholm and catcher Daulton Varsho is another year or so behind them.

The D-backs will have eight picks early in the 2019 Draft and making sure they hit on those selections will be "critical," according to Hazen.

And if they get to the non-waiver Trade Deadline next season and are floundering, Hazen can always decide to change course.

"I'm not sure exactly how I feel about it, honestly," he said. "If we get put in that situation, we'll have to react to that situation. I don't think treading water over a long period of time is going to be an answer to winning a World Series. We need to make some hard decisions and we will if we have to. I still see a lot of creative solutions out there, if we can put it together the right way, and that's on me. I've got to do that."

Steve Gilbert has covered the D-backs for MLB.com since 2001. Follow him on Twitter @SteveGilbertMLB.

Arizona Diamondbacks

Lovullo talks 2019 vision, roles for new players

D-backs manager meets with media at Winter Meetings
MLB.com @SteveGilbertMLB

LAS VEGAS -- D-backs manager Torey Lovullo met with reporters on Tuesday at the Winter Meetings and shared his thoughts on a variety of topics. Here are three main takeaways from his session:

1. Lovullo is aware he'll need to address losses of key players at Spring Training

LAS VEGAS -- D-backs manager Torey Lovullo met with reporters on Tuesday at the Winter Meetings and shared his thoughts on a variety of topics. Here are three main takeaways from his session:

1. Lovullo is aware he'll need to address losses of key players at Spring Training

Following the trade of Paul Goldschmidt, the loss of lefty Patrick Corbin and the expected departure of free-agent center fielder A.J. Pollock, Lovullo wants to make it clear to his players that he still has confidence and belief in them.

Hot Stove news, rumors

"My vision is perfectly clear," Lovullo said. "I want to go out and win and expect to win every single night. And I think the players feel the same way. It's something that I've rehearsed, saying it publicly, that I want these guys to know that there's a special group left there. There's a lot of offensive production and proven players inside this lineup already. Not that we're going to replace Paul, but we have some horsepower, we have some people that are ready to step up and they need to step up. They've played meaningful games. They've had meaning at-bats and meaningful situations, and they're ready to step up, take it to the next level."

Video: Gilbert on who might be the new face of the D-backs

2. If the season started today, Bradley would be closer

Following the decision to non-tender last year's closer, Brad Boxberger, the D-backs are looking for someone to fill the role. Archie Bradley, who had an uneven year after a dominant 2017, got some save opportunities last year, as did Yoshihisa Hirano.

"Personally, I think if you were going to come up here and arm wrestle me and force me to give you a decision, I'll probably start with Archie Bradley as the extreme back end of the equation," Lovullo said.

That, of course, is subject to how the rest of the offseason and Spring Training plays out.

Video: ARI@LAA: Bradley retires Pujols, completes 4-out save

3. Weaver and Kelly can count on getting opportunities at big league level

Catcher Carson Kelly was stuck behind Yadier Molina, who very rarely took days off, and the depth the Cardinals have in the rotation may have limited right-hander Luke Weaver in 2018.

In Arizona, though, Kelly will immediately join Alex Avila and John Ryan Murphy behind the plate, while Weaver will head to Spring Training with a spot in the rotation.

"They're going to both step in and have immediate impacts at the big league level," Lovullo said. "And that's what we're looking for. And it's up to them to come out and perform and be ready. And I think they will. I know they're super excited to be here, be in this organization with the opportunity that they're getting, the opportunity that we're talking about."

Video: Lovullo discusses Weaver and Kelly at Winter Meetings

Steve Gilbert has covered the D-backs for MLB.com since 2001. Follow him on Twitter @SteveGilbertMLB.

Arizona Diamondbacks

Kelly didn't know the KBO existed

Merrill Kelly's career might be one of the most unique in MLB history. While the D-backs are banking on their free agent signing to follow in the footsteps of pitchers like Miles Mikolas or Tony Barnette -- guys who struggled stateside and found themselves in Japan before returning -- there is one very big difference: Kelly went to Korea, a country known more for its home run hitters than its pitching prowess.

Lamb expected to play more first base in '19

D-backs need to replace Goldy, CF Pollock next season
MLB.com @SteveGilbertMLB

LAS VEGAS -- Since trading franchise icon Paul Goldschmidt last week, D-backs general manager Mike Hazen has fielded calls from his colleagues who believed the team might be at the beginning of a sell-off.

Those GMs have come away disappointed as Hazen informed them that was not the case.

LAS VEGAS -- Since trading franchise icon Paul Goldschmidt last week, D-backs general manager Mike Hazen has fielded calls from his colleagues who believed the team might be at the beginning of a sell-off.

Those GMs have come away disappointed as Hazen informed them that was not the case.

"I think teams have felt like if we're willing to do something like [trade Goldschmidt] that we'd be willing to do a lot of different things," Hazen said. "So I think that's probably been a prevalent reaction. I don't think we'd say never on anything necessarily, but there's certain guys that we're not going to probably end up doing anything with."

Latest Hot Stove rumors

Hazen didn't reveal who those players might be, but multiple reports have the D-backs either asking a lot for, or flat out saying no, to dealing outfielder David Peralta and lefty Robbie Ray, both of whom have two years to go before free agency.

So instead of a fire sale -- and feeling good about his starting rotation after acquiring Luke Weaver in the Goldschmidt trade and signing Merrill Kelly out of South Korea -- Hazen has turned his attention to replacing Goldschmidt and center fielder A.J. Pollock, who is expected to sign a lucrative free-agent deal elsewhere.

Video: Gilbert on who might be the new face of the D-backs

If he can get those two spots filled, Hazen likes his team's chances of being competitive in 2019.

To help take Goldschmidt's place, the D-backs plan on playing left-handed-hitting third baseman Jake Lamb at first.

"He's still going to play third base as well," Hazen said. "I think having some flexibility with the entire infield is going to be important, depending on how matchups stack up. We obviously have a few right-handed-hitting first basemen on the roster that provide a natural complement there if we went in that direction."

When Lamb plays first, the team could slide Eduardo Escobar to third.

If the D-backs want to go with a right-handed hitter at first base, Christian Walker and Kevin Cron could be possibilities.

Walker, 27, has seen limited big league time the past two seasons, but he has flashed tremendous power.

Cron, 25, who has not played in the big leagues, had a .921 OPS at Triple-A Reno last year.

Video: Rosenthal talks D-backs and Harper on MLB Tonight

More pressing for the D-backs is trying to find a replacement for Pollock in center.

The free-agent crop of center fielders is not particularly strong, and Jarrod Dyson and Socrates Brito are the only players currently on the roster who can play center. Dyson, Hazen said, probably doesn't project to be an everyday player.

Top free agents, by position

"Center field is still an obvious challenge for us," Hazen said. "Something that we need to address."

If the D-backs can't acquire a center fielder via trade without opening up another hole on the roster in the process, it's not out of the question that second baseman/shortstop Ketel Marte could be tried in center.

"I would think that a trade or Ketel full-time is probably more the avenue I would imagine," Hazen said. "Unless we could find a way to bring A.J. back."

Steve Gilbert has covered the D-backs for MLB.com since 2001. Follow him on Twitter @SteveGilbertMLB.

Arizona Diamondbacks, Jake Lamb

Goldschmidt trade emotional for Lovullo

MLB.com @SteveGilbertMLB

LAS VEGAS -- While D-backs general manager Mike Hazen was discussing with other teams the possibility of trading first baseman Paul Goldschmidt, manager Torey Lovullo expressed some reservations.

"I had spoken to Mike about reconsidering several times," Lovullo said Tuesday at the Winter Meetings. "I was just probably playing devil's advocate. Sometimes I would step in as a friend and at times [as] a colleague. I was attached to Paul, and it's a once-in-a-generation player. Are you sure this is something that needs to be done? [Hazen] would walk me through the steps and educate me and teach me as to why this had to happen for the organization. As I got more educated, I saw his point of view."

LAS VEGAS -- While D-backs general manager Mike Hazen was discussing with other teams the possibility of trading first baseman Paul Goldschmidt, manager Torey Lovullo expressed some reservations.

"I had spoken to Mike about reconsidering several times," Lovullo said Tuesday at the Winter Meetings. "I was just probably playing devil's advocate. Sometimes I would step in as a friend and at times [as] a colleague. I was attached to Paul, and it's a once-in-a-generation player. Are you sure this is something that needs to be done? [Hazen] would walk me through the steps and educate me and teach me as to why this had to happen for the organization. As I got more educated, I saw his point of view."

Goldschmidt was traded on Dec. 5 to the Cardinals for pitcher Luke Weaver, catcher Carson Kelly, Minor League infielder Andy Young and a 2019 Competitive Balance Round B pick.

Video: Lovullo discusses Weaver and Kelly at Winter Meetings

Lovullo understood the reasoning behind the trade and was fully supportive of the decision by the time it was made.

While dealing Goldschmidt was a difficult decision for Hazen, it was even harder for a manager like Lovullo, who prides himself on communicating with and building relationships with his players.

"I'm probably a little more emotionally attached to Paul and this decision as I am with every player," Lovullo said. "So when something like that is taking place, it's hard for me to see it the way Mike does. But that's his job. He's flying 30,000 feet above it, and he knows what the overall perspective is. And I trust him. I trust where this organization is going. And it's his vision. I believe in that. So, when he's informing me about some of the thoughts that he's having, I support him."

Hazen and Lovullo met with Goldschmidt at Lovullo's house to deliver the trade news in person.

"And it was a sad moment for me," Lovullo said. "I didn't talk a lot because I probably couldn't. And I had a little bit of a conversation with him once Mike left that I'd like to keep private, but it meant a lot to me."

Steve Gilbert has covered the D-backs for MLB.com since 2001. Follow him on Twitter @SteveGilbertMLB.

Arizona Diamondbacks, Paul Goldschmidt

Kelly, Weaver excited for opportunity in Arizona

MLB.com @SteveGilbertMLB

PHOENIX -- Catcher Carson Kelly and right-hander Luke Weaver, two key pieces that came over from the Cardinals in the Paul Goldschmidt trade, will have plenty of opportunity to make a mark in Arizona.

Kelly, who was blocked behind the plate in St. Louis by Yadier Molina and appeared in just 63 games over three seasons at the big league level, hopes to put the lessons he learned watching the All-Star to good use.

PHOENIX -- Catcher Carson Kelly and right-hander Luke Weaver, two key pieces that came over from the Cardinals in the Paul Goldschmidt trade, will have plenty of opportunity to make a mark in Arizona.

Kelly, who was blocked behind the plate in St. Louis by Yadier Molina and appeared in just 63 games over three seasons at the big league level, hopes to put the lessons he learned watching the All-Star to good use.

D-backs swap Goldschmidt for 3 players, Draft pick

Kelly should get expanded playing time this year as part of the D-backs three-catcher group, along with Alex Avila and John Ryan Murphy.

"It's kind of unique because I got to see him on a day-to-day basis and see how he goes about his business and how he prepares for a game," Kelly said of Molina, who is revered for his ability to work with pitchers and call a game. "And I've gone to five Spring Trainings with him, so I've got to see firsthand the work ethic and what it takes to be a Gold Glove catcher and the leader of a team. I've just taken that stuff to heart. I've written a lot of stuff down. I like to write stuff down. I've taken a lot of information in and applied to that to my game and now I feel that I'm getting my opportunity to go out there and perform and show what I've got."

Video: Hazen discusses D-backs' return for Goldschmidt

The same can be said of Weaver, who took a step back in performance going 7-11 with a 4.95 ERA last season after a 7-2 record and a 3.88 ERA in 2017.

Where the Cardinals had a lot of starting pitching depth, the D-backs will count on Weaver to fill a spot in the rotation out of Spring Training.

D-backs GM Mike Hazen said that while Weaver's results might not have been what he wanted in 2018, the right-hander's stuff was still as impressive as ever and Arizona will take a deeper dive into his pitch usage and see if they can find some ways for him to improve.

"I don't think it's anything drastic," said Weaver. "I think just continue to keep doing what I'm doing, but make minor adjustments. From what [D-backs pitching coach Mike Butcher] was talking about and the things I was hearing, I think it will fit perfectly into what my goals are, what my expectations have been. And it gets me really excited to get in there and get acclimated and all of that."

Helping both players transition will be the fact that they are making the change together after being friends for so long.

"We were actually roommates in High A and we kind of played together all the way up the Minor League system," Kelly said. "This opportunity with Arizona to get a 'fresh start' or whatever it may be, I think for [Weaver] it's going to be a good reset for him and I think he's going to have a big 2019."

Steve Gilbert has covered the D-backs for MLB.com since 2001. Follow him on Twitter @SteveGilbertMLB.

Arizona Diamondbacks, Carson Kelly, Luke Weaver

Varsho makes AFL's Top Prospects team

MLB.com @wboor

Braxton Davidson's dramatic walk-off homer in the 10th inning back on Nov. 17th lifted the Peoria Javelinas to back-to-back Arizona Fall League titles and signified the end of the AFL season.

However, here at MLB Pipeline, coverage of the AFL is constant. Following the on-the-field play, we have released our top 10 breakout prospects, the top 25 prospects of the AFL and our All-Arizona Fall League Team.

Braxton Davidson's dramatic walk-off homer in the 10th inning back on Nov. 17th lifted the Peoria Javelinas to back-to-back Arizona Fall League titles and signified the end of the AFL season.

However, here at MLB Pipeline, coverage of the AFL is constant. Following the on-the-field play, we have released our top 10 breakout prospects, the top 25 prospects of the AFL and our All-Arizona Fall League Team.

Of course, there's always room for more accolades and that's just what we have below as the Arizona Fall League announced its 2018 Top Prospects team on Monday morning.

The team, selected by league managers and coaches, recognizes players who distinguished themselves against other top prospects throughout the AFL. Voters were asked to consider not only a player's AFL performance, but also their Major League projectability.

Catchers

Daulton Varsho, D-backs No. 5 prospect: Varsho, who put together four multihit efforts over a five-game span, hit .262 and drove in nine runs in 18 games.

Keibert Ruiz, Dodgers No. 2 prospect (No. 39 on Top 100): Ruiz played in just 13 games, but left a strong impression on the league's managers and coaches. The 20-year-old hit .286 with six RBIs and also drew six walks while striking out just twice.

Video: Top Prospects: Keibert Ruiz, C, Dodgers

First Base

Tyler Nevin, Rockies No. 11 prospect: Nevin hit a career-best .328 over 100 games during the regular season and carried that momentum with him into Arizona. Nevin got off to a fast start in the AFL, opening play with a 10-game hitting streak. From there, it was more of the same. The 21-year-old was the AFL's only .400 hitter and ran away with the batting title, slashing .426/.535/.593 and also finished third in the league with 20 RBIs.

Video: SRR@PEJ: Nevin recovers nicely to end the 3rd

Evan White, Mariners No. 5 prospectWhite, who collected 14 RBIs over 18 games, hit .257 with a pair of homers in the AFL. White put together a nine-game hitting streak from late October to early November and also stole two bases after stealing just four during the regular season.

Second Base:

Keston Hiura, Brewers No. 1 prospect (No. 30 on the Top 100): Hiura's ability to hit was no secret -- something his 70-grade hit tool clearly indicated. However, just because it was known that Hiura can hit doesn't mean that watching him do so was any less impressive. The Brewers top prospect went to Arizona to work on his defense and while he made strides in that department, it was his offense that led to him MVP honors. Hiura, who hit .323, led the league in hits (31), RBIs (33) and total bases (54). He also hit the only grand slam of the AFL, put together 11 multihit games and turned in two five-RBI performances.

Jahmai Jones, Angels No. 4 prospect: Jones, coming off a season during which he hit just .239 over 123 games, hit .321 with two homers and 11 RBI in 19 AFL contests.

Third Base:

Vladimir Guerrero Jr., Blue Jays No. 1 prospect (No. 1 on Top 100): Guerrero entered the AFL as the most talked-about prospect and certainly didn't disappoint. Guerrero picked up a trio of hits on Opening Day and kept the hits coming as he began the season with a 13-game hitting streak. The 19-year-old also impressed on the league's biggest stage, hitting a 117 mph double in the Fall Stars Game and concluded his stint in Arizona with a .351 batting average.

Video: Chisholm on Vlad Jr.'s Fall League performance

Yu Chang, Indians No. 6 prospect: Chang, who also played in the 2017 Fall League, put together a strong offensive showing. The shortstop hit .337, thanks in large part to a stretch where he strung together eight multihit efforts over 12 games. Chang also finished tied for third in total bases (45) and fourth in hits (29).

Shortstops:

Cole Tucker, Pirates No. 5 prospect: Tucker's .370 average certainly jumps off the page, but the 22-year-old impressed defensively as well. Tucker's 11 multihit games tied for the league lead (Hiura) and his 30 hits left him tied for second. Tucker also impressed off the field, reguarily staying after the game to take photos and sign autographs and was honored with the league's sportsmanship award.

Video: Cole Tucker talks about his Fall League experience

 Lucius Fox, Rays No. 9 prospect: Fox, who hit .326 over 21 games, put together an eight-game hitting streak in mid-October and tied for second in the league with 10 multihit games. Fox also drew 16 walks and stole seven bases.

Outfielders:

Luis Robert, White Sox No. 4 prospect (No. 44 on Top 100): Robert missed a little bit of time with a minor injury during the AFL, but still hit .324 over 18 games. The winner of the week five Player of the Week Award, Robert put up a 14-game hitting streak from Oc. 9 to Nov. 9. The hitting streak was the longest in the AFL since 2014.

Cristian Pache, Braves No. 6 prospect (No. 68 on the Top 100): Pache hit .279 and turned in four straight multihit games in late October, but the 20-year-old may have been even more impressive defensively. Pache showed off his 60-grade arm and his 70-grade speed on numerous occasions in the outfield and also used that speed to steal three bases.

Ryan McKenna, Orioles No. 12 prospect: McKenna hit .315/.410/.457 over 127 games during the regular season, his best season since the Orioles picked him in the fourth-round of the 2015 Draft, and continued the breakout campaign in Arizona, where he hit .344/.474/.590.

Sam Hilliard, Rockies No. 9 prospectHilliard played in just 16 games, but the small sample size didn't keep him from producing. Hilliard had multiple hits in nearly half (seven) of the games he played and finished with two homers and a .328 average.

Daz Cameron, Tigers No. 8 prospectCameron stole 24 bases in the regular season and then swiped nine bases, which tied him for fourth, during the AFL. The son of former Major Leaguer Mike Cameron hit .342 over 20 games.

Nick Heath, Royals: Heath posted a .427 on-base percentage and once he got on base, he made the most of the opportunities. The Royals prospect led the AFL in stolen bases (13) and runs scored (21), while batting .338 over 21 games.

Designated Hitters:

Peter Alonso, Mets No. 2 prospect (No. 58 on the Top 100): Alonso tied for the Minor League home run lead with 36 during the regular season and then tied for the AFL lead with six. In addition to his six homers, Alonso also hit seven doubles and often showed off his power with eye-popping exit velocities.

Video: EAST@WEST: Alonso lays out for impressive diving stop

Will Craig, Pirates No. 16 prospectCraig tied with Alonso and Davidson for the home run title, while also hitting .304 over 21 games.

Starting Pitchers

Nate Pearson, Blue Jays No. 4 prospect (No. 90 on the Top 100): Pearson racked up 23 strikeouts in 20 1/3 innings and although his ERA sat at 6.20, he did spin three scoreless outings. What's more, Pearson garnered plenty of attention during the Fall Stars Game when his fastball was clocked at 104 mph.

Video: EAST@WEST: Pearson flashes 101 mph+ with regularity

Erick Leal, Cubs: Leal nearly finished the AFL with a perfect 0.00 ERA, but gave up seven runs (six earned) in his final start. The right-hander began the AFL with a 19 1/3-inning scoreless streak and finished 2-1 with a 2.66 ERA over six starts.

Relief Pitchers:

Melvin Adon, Giants No. 19 prospect: Adon, a hard-throwing right-hander, was consistently missing bats out in Arizona. Adon notched 21 strikeouts in 12 1/3 innings and limited opponents to a .163 batting average against. He was particuarily tough on right-handers as they managed to hit just .091 against him.

Justin Lawrence, Rockies No. 16 prospect: Lawrence tied for the AFL lead with three saves and used a nasty fastball-slider combo to strike out 13 batters in 10 2/3 innings.

William Boor is a reporter for MLB Pipeline. Follow him on Twitter at @wboor.

D-backs get 3 players from Cards for Goldy

RHP Weaver, catcher Kelly and Minor Leaguer Young head to Arizona
MLB.com @SteveGilbertMLB

PHOENIX -- The Paul Goldschmidt Era came to an end for the D-backs on Wednesday as the club dealt the All-Star first baseman to the Cardinals in exchange for catcher Carson Kelly, right-hander Luke Weaver, Minor League infielder Andy Young and St. Louis' Compensation Round B selection in next year's Draft.

Goldschmidt, who was selected by the D-backs in the eighth round of the 2010 Draft, made his big league debut on Aug. 1, 2011. He appeared in six All-Star Games, won four Silver Slugger Awards, three Rawlings Gold Glove Awards and finished second in the National League Most Valuable Player Award voting twice (2013 and '15).

PHOENIX -- The Paul Goldschmidt Era came to an end for the D-backs on Wednesday as the club dealt the All-Star first baseman to the Cardinals in exchange for catcher Carson Kelly, right-hander Luke Weaver, Minor League infielder Andy Young and St. Louis' Compensation Round B selection in next year's Draft.

Goldschmidt, who was selected by the D-backs in the eighth round of the 2010 Draft, made his big league debut on Aug. 1, 2011. He appeared in six All-Star Games, won four Silver Slugger Awards, three Rawlings Gold Glove Awards and finished second in the National League Most Valuable Player Award voting twice (2013 and '15).

The 31-year-old leaves the D-backs as the franchise's leader in OPS (.930), on-base percentage (.398), slugging percentage (.532), walks (655) and is second in home runs (209), RBIs (710), doubles (267), hits (1,182) and games played (1,092).

"Paul is possibly the best player in the National League," D-backs general manager Mike Hazen said. "We understand that and we've understood that for a very long time. He has been the face of this franchise, neither of which were taken lightly when we made this decision."

Video: Hazen on why D-backs decided to trade Goldschmidt

While Hazen knew the move would be unpopular with much of the fan base, he also realized that Goldschmidt was in the final year of his contract and there was no guarantee that any talk of an extension would yield results.

And with veteran Zack Greinke making roughly $32 million in each of the next three years and Yasmany Tomas making $32.5 million over that same period, it made signing Goldschmidt to a big-money deal untenable.

Tweet from @Dbacks: For your dedication.For your heart.For everything.Thank you, Goldy. pic.twitter.com/gHEzENdqtI

So, if the D-backs held onto Goldschmidt through the offseason they would get less value in a trade at next year's July 31 non-waiver Trade Deadline, and if he left via free agency at the end of the 2019 season the best they would end up with would be a compensation pick after the first round of the 2019 Draft.

By making the deal with the Cardinals, the D-backs got the comp pick (albeit in the Compensation B Round rather than the Compensation A Round they would have gotten if Goldschmidt left via free agency), a pair of players that they feel can help them in 2019 and are under control for the next six years (Kelly) and five years (Weaver). Plus, they get a talented young infielder in Young.

"There are decisions that you want to do and there are decisions you feel like you have to do," Hazen said. "I feel like this fell in the category of the latter, just in terms of what it means for us moving forward."

The D-backs do not plan on doing a rebuild, but rather a retooling, so they focused on receiving Major League-ready talent in return.

Tweet from @Dbacks: Luke Weaver was a 1st-round pick in 2014 & the Cardinals��� Minor League Pitcher of the Year in 2016.Carson Kelly was ranked by @BaseballAmerica as the 3rd-best catching prospect & the Cardinals' #3 prospect.Andy Young was 5th in the 2018 Arizona Fall League with a .936 OPS.

Kelly, who was blocked in St. Louis by Yadier Molina, figures to slide into a three-person mix behind the plate with Alex Avila and John Ryan Murphy. The 24-year-old is regarded as an excellent defender and handler of pitchers, a huge point of emphasis for the D-backs.

Weaver will go into the D-backs rotation, joining Greinke, Robbie Ray, Zack Godley and the recently signed Merrill Kelly. Taijuan Walker is expected to be back in May following last year's Tommy John surgery.

Young, 24, has played second, short and third during his time in the Minors with the Cardinals advancing as high as Double-A. He hit .301 during the recently completed Arizona Fall League.

Video: C. Kelly, Weaver discuss being traded to D-backs

"Certainly, we think very highly of the players we got back," Hazen said. "Kelly and Weaver, I think, jump right on to the club. Weaver slots into the rotation and Kelly we see, obviously, as an everyday catcher moving forward. Andy Young is somebody that we scouted pretty extensively, most notably and most recently in the Fall League, where he had a tremendous season and then a tremendous Fall League."

And the D-backs get the Cardinals' 2019 pick in the Competitive Balance Round B of the Draft. That, along with their own No. 1 pick, the 26th overall pick (as compensation for not signing last year's first-round pick), their own Competitive Balance pick, two comp picks for the expected signing of Patrick Corbin with the Nationals, the expected signing elsewhere of A.J. Pollock and their own second-round pick gives the D-backs seven picks in roughly the first 80 or so in the 2019 Draft.

"We should be in a good position there to continue to infuse talent from a long-term standpoint," Hazen said.

Video: After Goldy trade, how will D-backs fill first base?

Steve Gilbert has covered the D-backs for MLB.com since 2001. Follow him on Twitter @SteveGilbertMLB.

Arizona Diamondbacks, Paul Goldschmidt, Carson Kelly, Luke Weaver

What's next for D-backs in wake of Goldy trade?

MLB.com @SteveGilbertMLB

PHOENIX -- Following the trade of first baseman Paul Goldschmidt to the Cardinals on Wednesday, one question remains: What's next for the D-backs?

One thing that doesn't appear to be on GM Mike Hazen's radar is a complete teardown and rebuild.

PHOENIX -- Following the trade of first baseman Paul Goldschmidt to the Cardinals on Wednesday, one question remains: What's next for the D-backs?

One thing that doesn't appear to be on GM Mike Hazen's radar is a complete teardown and rebuild.

"I don't see that as a very likely scenario -- that there's a rash of trades coming -- in my mind," Hazen said. "As I said before, we have a lot of talent on this roster. Can we complement that and put it back together a certain way?"

So it doesn't seem like a trade of veteran ace Zack Greinke is in the offing at the moment. Sure, getting out from under the more than $100 million left on the right-hander's contract over the next three years would give the team a lot of financial flexibility, but the D-backs have no plans to dump Greinke's salary, nor do they seem to have much of an appetite for eating a good portion of his salary to do it.

Tweet from @Dbacks: For your dedication.For your heart.For everything.Thank you, Goldy. pic.twitter.com/gHEzENdqtI

Having finished 82-80 last season and with center fielder A.J. Pollock and left-hander Patrick Corbin hitting free agency, the D-backs knew they were going to face a dilemma this offseason.

"It's hard to lose that much talent and be able to reimagine the team the exact same way without making other types of changes where you're adding talent back in other ways," Hazen said.

Video: Hazen on why D-backs decided to trade Goldschmidt

So far this offseason, the team re-signed Eduardo Escobar, whose positional flexibility gives the D-backs an opportunity to move pieces around.

For example, should third baseman Jake Lamb slide over to first base to replace Goldschmidt, then Escobar could play third. If the team decides to move second baseman Ketel Marte to center to replace Pollock, then Escobar could play second.

Video: After Goldy trade, how will D-backs fill first base?

"I don't think there's anything predetermined with where we're at," Hazen said. "We're still working toward putting as much talent on this roster as we can."

The D-backs' first priority will be to find a center fielder to replace Pollock -- unless they decide Marte fits that bill. After that, they will look to shore up the bullpen, because, in Hazen's mind, you can never have enough bullpen help.

Video: D-backs receive Weaver, Kelly, Young for Goldschmidt

While they realize that their team looks weaker on paper than it did at the end of the season, the D-backs' hope is that they can be competitive in 2019, while building for the future.

Some of those pieces came in the Goldschmidt trade with pitcher Luke Weaver fortifying the rotation and Carson Kelly giving them a catcher under control for the next six years.

Add in an expected seven selections in the first 80 picks of the 2019 Draft along with talented Minor Leaguers a year or two away and you can see a wave building for the future.

The goal is to stay afloat in the meantime.

Steve Gilbert has covered the D-backs for MLB.com since 2001. Follow him on Twitter @SteveGilbertMLB.

Arizona Diamondbacks

Each team's best 1st-rounder of the past decade

MLB.com

The release of the 2019 Draft Top 50 list had the MLB Pipeline staff thinking about Drafts in years past. Teams always want to get that first pick right, and there have been some real home runs hit in the first round.

Who were the best first-round picks for each team over the last decade? MLB Pipeline dug through the first rounds of the last 10 years (2009-18) and picked the top first-rounder for each organization. Only those chosen in what was the official first round each year were considered -- no supplemental picks were allowed. The 2014 Draft has been the most fruitful, with six players from that first round making the list. The Drafts from 2012 and 2009 are right behind with five selections, with the latter boasting the player who has to be the single best first-round selection over the last 10 years.

The release of the 2019 Draft Top 50 list had the MLB Pipeline staff thinking about Drafts in years past. Teams always want to get that first pick right, and there have been some real home runs hit in the first round.

Who were the best first-round picks for each team over the last decade? MLB Pipeline dug through the first rounds of the last 10 years (2009-18) and picked the top first-rounder for each organization. Only those chosen in what was the official first round each year were considered -- no supplemental picks were allowed. The 2014 Draft has been the most fruitful, with six players from that first round making the list. The Drafts from 2012 and 2009 are right behind with five selections, with the latter boasting the player who has to be the single best first-round selection over the last 10 years.

AL East

Marcus Stroman, RHP, Blue Jays, 2012 (No. 22 overall)
Stroman's profile scared away many teams in the 2012 Draft, but the Duke product has done his part to overcome the stigma associated with being an undersized right-hander. Though he regressed in 2018, while dealing with right shoulder fatigue and, later, a blister issue, Stroman posted back-to-back 200-inning seasons (2016-17) and has been worth 10.6 WAR over five seasons with the Blue Jays.

Manny Machado, SS, Orioles, 2010 (No. 3 overall)
Machado made the jump straight from Double-A to the Majors as a 19-year-old in late 2012, and quickly became a star. His 33.8 WAR is the highest among 2010 first-round position players, second only to Chris Sale, and after helping guide Baltimore to two postseason appearances as a four-time All-Star, Machado netted the organization five Top 30 prospects when it dealt him to the Dodgers this past July.

Ryne Stanek, RHP, Rays, 2013 (No. 29 overall)
Drafting in the first round has long been a problem for the typically savvy Rays, and even their selection of Stanek isn't a hands-down win for the organization, considering he was viewed as a starter (before needing hip surgery) out of the Draft. That said, the right-hander emerged as a legitimate late-inning weapon (and, at times, an "opener") for the Rays in 2018, when he compiled a 2.98 ERA, 1.09 WHIP and 11.0 strikeouts per nine innings over 66 1/3 innings (59 appearances).

Andrew Benintendi, OF, Red Sox, 2015 (No. 7 overall)
Benintendi went from unheralded Arkansas freshman to consensus College Baseball Player of the Year as a sophomore, soaring up Draft boards in the process. The Red Sox had him No. 2 on theirs (behind Dansby Swanson), which he justified by becoming a regular in their 2018 World Series championship lineup just 13 months after signing.

Video: 2015 Draft: Red Sox draft OF Andrew Benintendi No. 7

Aaron Judge, OF, Yankees, 2013 (No. 32 overall)
Judge was the second of three Yankees first-rounders in 2013, sandwiched between Eric Jagielo (No. 26) and Ian Clarkin (No. 33), and lasting that long because there were questions about how well his massive raw power would translate into production. After only hitting 18 homers in three years at Fresno State and 56 in three seasons in the Minors, he exploded for a rookie-record 52 in 2017.

AL Central

Francisco Lindor, SS, Indians, 2011 (No. 8 overall)
Cleveland landed perhaps the best player in a historically good first-round class, as Lindor has become one of the faces of game while totaling 23.9 WAR -- second to Mookie Betts (35.2) among 2011 draftees -- and leading the Indians to an American League title (2016) since his debut in '15, when he finished second in AL Rookie of the Year Award voting. Entering his age-25 season, he's garnered All-Star honors and finished Top 10 in MVP voting in each of the last three years.

Aaron Crow, RHP, Royals, 2009 (No. 12 overall)
The Royals haven't fared well in the first round during the last decade, though Crow made the All-Star Game as a rookie in 2011, and was an effective reliever for four seasons until he blew out his elbow shortly after a trade to the Marlins. Cristian Colon (No. 4 overall, 2010) didn't have as much sustained success but delivered the championship-winning hit in the 2015 World Series.

Casey Mize, RHP, Tigers, 2018 (No. 1 overall)
Perhaps this one is more aspirational because he's thrown only 13 2/3 career innings since being the top pick in last June's Draft, but Mize should be able to use his three plus pitches and his plus control to move quickly through the Tigers' system. Look for him in Detroit sooner rather than later.

Alex Kirilloff, OF, Twins, 2016 (No. 16 overall)
The rules for this story don't allow for a supplemental first-round pick to be chosen, otherwise Jose Berrios might be the guy. But after missing the 2017 season, Kirilloff erupted in '18, his first real full season, and is looking like one of the best hitting prospects in all of baseball.

Chris Sale, LHP, White Sox, 2010 (No. 13 overall)
After 2010's Big Three of Bryce Harper, Jameson Taillon and Machado, Sale should have been the next player taken. But teams psyched themselves out over worries about his low arm slot and desire for a big league contract (typical for top college arms at the time), allowing the White Sox to steal him at No. 13. He was saving games for Chicago by September and has been an All-Star in each of his seven seasons as a starter.

Video: WS2018 Gm1: Sale K's Dozier to start off World Series

AL West

Matt Chapman, 3B, A's, 2014 (No. 25 overall)
Chapman emerged as the A's next homegrown star in his first fully healthy season, as he ranked third in WAR (8.2) among all position players, finished seventh in AL MVP voting and took home the revered Platinum Glove award as baseball's best defensive player. His 11.7 WAR in 229 career games is tops among positional players from his Draft class -- ahead of even Trea Turner (10.4), who's played 360 games.

Mike Trout, OF, Angels, 2009 (No. 25 overall)
The teams that say they had Trout No. 2 on their board are sort of like the million people who say they were present for The Shot Heard Round the World. Their loss was the Angels' gain, obviously, as he's turned into one of the game's top stars, with seven All-Star appearances and two MVP Awards.

Carlos Correa, SS, Astros, 2012 (No. 1 overall)
George Springer (No. 11, 2011) and Alex Bregman (No. 2, 2015) can also make a case, but our choice is Correa. A series of impressive pre-Draft workouts gave him late helium and made him the first Puerto Rican taken with the top choice. He won AL Rookie of the Year Award honors in '15, then received All-Star recognition and won a World Series two year later.

Video: ALCS Gm1: Correa knocks go-ahead single in 6th

Mike Zunino, C, Mariners, 2012 (No. 3 overall)
Zunino struggled for several years after being rushed to the Major Leagues and hit .207 over 2,000 plate appearances with Seattle. His combination of right-handed power and strong defense behind the plate, however, became increasingly valuable, especially with the quality of the position on the decline across the Majors.

Lewis Brinson, OF, Rangers, 2012 (No. 29 overall)
The Rangers' 13 first-round picks from the last decade have produced only three big leaguers and a combined -0.4 WAR so far. An exceptional athlete who has yet to hit in the Majors, Brinson went to the Brewers in a deal for Jeremy Jeffress and Jonathan Lucroy in July 2016, and to the Marlins in a trade for Christian Yelich last January.

NL East

Kyle Wright, RHP, Braves, 2017 (No. 5 overall)
The Braves hoped Wright would move quickly when they took him with their first pick in the 2017 Draft out of Vanderbilt. Starting his first full season in Double-A was a good sign and reaching Atlanta before the year was over was ahead of schedule, even for a fast-tracker.

Christian Yelich, OF, Marlins, 2010 (No. 23 overall)
One of the 2010 Draft's better hitters as a California prep, Yelich reached the Majors in mid-2013 and received a seven-year, $49.57 million contract extension two years later. He hit .290/.369/.432 (18.6 WAR) over 643 games with Miami, and then helped the organization restock its farm system with four prospects, including Brinson and Monte Harrison, when they dealt him to Milwaukee last offseason. In his first year with the Brewers, Yelich won the batting title (.326) and powered the club to the National League Championship Series en route to MVP honors.

Video: NLCS Gm7: Yelich crushes solo homer to right-center

Michael Conforto, OF, Mets, 2014 (No. 10 overall)
It took the Oregon State product only a year to get to the big leagues, and while his performance has been a little up and down, he's hit 56 homers the last two years and has an All-Star nod already on his resume. Still only 25, he has already amassed nearly 1,400 Major League at-bats.

Bryce Harper, OF, Nationals, 2010 (No. 1 overall)
The Nationals' selection of Harper with the first pick in the 2010 Draft forever changed the course of the franchise, as it gave the club a player with near-immediate impact potential as well as generational-star upside worthy of building around. Over seven seasons with the Nats, Harper -- a six-time All-Star and the 2015 NL MVP -- hit .279/.388/.512 with 184 homers in 927 games, good for a 27.4 WAR.

Aaron Nola, RHP, Phillies, 2014 (No. 7 overall)
Nola took his combination of solid stuff and outstanding command and made a beeline to Philadelphia, joining the rotation in just over a year following his selection. And the 25-year-old is just getting going, making his first All-Star team and finishing third in NL Cy Young Award voting in 2018.

NL Central

Keston Hiura, 2B, Brewers, 2017 (No. 9 overall)
The Brewers' track record with first-round picks isn't great, but Hiura could soon help reverse that trend. After leading all Division I hitters in average (.442) as a UC Irvine junior, Hiura raked his way up to Double-A this past season and then took home MVP honors in the prestigious Arizona Fall League. He still needs some more time in the Minors, but it shouldn't be long before Hiura is driving in runs from the middle of Milwaukee's order.

Jack Flaherty, RHP, 2014 (No. 34 overall)
The Cardinals have had some solid back-half-of-the-first-round selections, like Michael Wacha and Kolten Wong, but Flaherty made it to the big leagues in 2017, then finished fifth in NL Rookie of the Year voting in '18. Flaherty will be only 23 in 2019, so the best may be yet to come.

Kris Bryant, 3B, Cubs, 2013 (No. 2 overall)
Bryant had a stunning junior season at San Diego, swatting 31 homers to not only lead NCAA Division I but also topping 223 of the 296 teams at that level. He raced to the big leagues, winning the NL Rookie of the Year Award in 2015 and encoring with an NL MVP Award and World Series championship the next season.

Video: STL@CHC: Bryant belts a towering solo homer to center

Gerrit Cole, RHP, Pirates, 2011 (No. 1 overall)
Cole's 17.4 WAR is more than double any other Pirates' first-rounder in the last decade. Perhaps his tenure with Pittsburgh was up and down, but he made the All-Star team, finished fourth in NL Cy Young voting and made three postseason starts in 2015. He's also topped 200 innings in three of the last four years (albeit the last one coming for the Astros).

Mike Leake, RHP, Reds, 2009 (No. 8 overall)
Leake spent exactly zero days in the Minor Leagues between getting drafted and his Major League debut, breaking with the Reds' rotation on Opening Day in 2010. He's compiled more WAR than any Reds first-rounder in the last 10 years (15.6) and his trade to the Giants in 2015 netted them Adam Duvall (two years of 30-plus homers) and Keury Mella, who should contribute to the pitching staff in '19.

NL West

A.J. Pollock, OF, D-backs, 2009 (No. 17 overall)
When Pollock was coming out of Notre Dame, he was a solid college performer, but one who didn't have a plus tool, so some thought he might end up a bit of a tweener. There have been some injuries, but there's also been an All-Star appearance and a Gold Glove as an everyday center fielder, one who is currently coveted on the free-agent market.

Corey Seager, SS, Dodgers, 2012 (No. 18 overall)
After taking pitchers with their previous six first-round choices -- landing Clayton Kershaw and five non-impact big leaguers -- the Dodgers changed course and went for Seager, who was one of the better all-around high school bats but also came with some signability concerns in the first Draft with bonus-pool rules. He signed for $2.35 million ($400,000 above the assigned value at No. 18) and proved well worth it, earning the NL Rookie of the Year Award in 2016 and All-Star recognition in each of his two full big league seasons.

Zack Wheeler, RHP, Giants, 2009 (No. 6 overall)
He wasn't a cornerstone of World Series championships like Giants 2006-08 first-rounders Tim Lincecum, Madison Bumgarner and Buster Posey, but the guy who followed them has been a quality big league starter when healthy. Wheeler didn't last long with San Francisco, however, going to the Mets in a 2011 trade for Carlos Beltran.

Trea Turner, SS, Padres, 2014 (No. 13 overall)
Turner played the first half of his pro debut on borrowed time, as he'd already been dealt to the Nationals as part of a three-team trade with Tampa Bay (that netted the Padres Wil Myers) by the time the 2015 season began. He's emerged as one of the more impactful young players with the Nats.

Video: Draft 2014: Padres draft SS Trea Turner No. 13

Kyle Freeland, LHP, Rockies, 2014 (No. 8 overall)
The Rockies hoped for Kyle Schwarber or Nola, but the Cubs and Phillies foiled those plans and led them to Freeland, whose elbow worried some clubs because he had arthroscopic surgery as a Denver high schooler. He had bone chips removed from his elbow in 2015 but has been otherwise healthy, winning 11 games as a rookie in '17 and finishing fourth in NL Cy Young Award voting last season.

Jim Callis is a reporter for MLB.com. Follow @jimcallisMLB on Twitter. Listen to him on the weekly Pipeline Podcast.

Jonathan Mayo is a reporter for MLB Pipeline. Follow him on Twitter @JonathanMayo and Facebook, and listen to him on the weekly Pipeline Podcast.

Mike Rosenbaum is a reporter for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter at @GoldenSombrero.

D-backs paid tribute to Paul Goldschmidt