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Bullpen scuffles as D-backs drop opener to Rox

Marte's career-high 4 RBIs, Pollock's 5 hits not enough in loss
MLB.com

PHOENIX -- The Arizona bullpen has been so good for so long this season that the occasional hiccups can surprise.

Premier setup man Archie Bradley gave up six runs on three hits and three walks in the seventh inning while unable to hold a three-run lead in an 11-10 loss to the Rockies at Chase Field on Friday.

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PHOENIX -- The Arizona bullpen has been so good for so long this season that the occasional hiccups can surprise.

Premier setup man Archie Bradley gave up six runs on three hits and three walks in the seventh inning while unable to hold a three-run lead in an 11-10 loss to the Rockies at Chase Field on Friday.

View Full Game Coverage

For Bradley, especially, unexpected is an understatement.

Bradley entered with an ERA under 2.00 and had allowed only 10 earned runs all season, never more than two in one game, until the Rockies strung together a series of good at-bats that culminated with pinch-hitter Raimel Tapia's two-out grand slam for an 11-8 lead.

Bradley set a Major League record with 26 holds before the All-Star break and even after consecutive two-out walks to Gerardo Parra and Tony Wolters forced in a run and brought Tapia to the plate in the seventh, manager Torey Lovullo said he never considered a pitching change.

Video: COL@ARI: Pollock laces an RBI double to left field

"I didn't think twice about removing him from the game," Lovullo said. "He was going to stay out there. He's been our guy and will continue to be our guy. He's been lights-out. He's been our guy in those situations. If he gets off the mound giving up two runs and we were up by one run, he had still done his job.

"He is human, but he's an easy bet to get the worm to turn. It looked like he was having trouble locating his fastball, and I just kept feeling that every pitch was going to be that much closer to getting back to the form that we saw prior to the All-Star break."

A.J. Pollock had a career-high five hits, Ketel Marte had a career-high four RBIs and David Peralta had four hits as the D-backs scored more runs Friday than they had in the final five games combined before the All-Star break. They also showed heart, adding runs in the eighth and ninth and putting the tying run on third before Jon Jay took a called third strike to end it.

Video: COL@ARI: Peralta collects 4 hits, scores 3 runs

Bradley nearly wiggled out of the seventh inning, striking out Trevor Story and Ian Desmond on 97 mph fastballs around an RBI single to Carlos Gonzalez. But he walked Parra on a 3-1 pitch to load the bases and lost Wolters on a 3-2 fastball that strayed inside. The loss of command was especially unexpected. Bradley had walked only 11 batters in 45 2/3 innings this season, never more than two in a game. He had walked one in his last 13 games.

"Pretty crappy," Bradley said. "Just didn't have my stuff. Just didn't have command. I felt like I found it. Made some good pitches to Story. Some good pitches to Desmond. One pitch away from really only giving up one run and just couldn't make that final pitch I needed to tonight.

Video: COL@ARI: Lovullo discusses 11-10 loss to Rockies

"Pretty frustrating, but the good news is, I did blow the first game after the Al-Star break last year and we made the playoffs. If that's a sign, we are going to be OK."

MOMENTS THAT MATTERED
D-backs baserunners twice aggressively advanced from first to third on singles.

Jake Lamb took third on Marte's single to right-center with two outs in the first inning and scored on a passed ball. The next batter grounded out. Steven Souza Jr. took third on Lamb's single in the third inning, and he was able to score when Desmond bobbled a routine grounder and had only one play, at first. The next batter grounded out again that inning.

Video: COL@ARI: Lamb scores from third on a passed ball

SOUND SMART
Pollock was an equal opportunity attacker in his first career five-hit game. He turned around two 97 mph four-seam fastballs from German Marquez in his first two at-bats, then pulled an 81 mph curveball over the bag at third for an infield single. He doubled on a 94 mph two-seamer from Scott Oberg and smoothly placed an 81 mph slider from Adam Ottavino into left field for his final single in the eighth inning.

Video: COL@ARI: Pollock tallies 5 hits vs. the Rockies

HE SAID IT
"That's why this game is so great. It's a game of inches. Charlie Blackmon picks that ball off the ground. If that ball gets by him, I feel strongly that we could have tied the game and had a runner at second base. It was a great jump. A great read and a great catch. And that's what great players do." -- Lovullo, on Blackmon's sliding catch in the ninth inning that turned into a sacrifice fly instead of a potential game-tying hit with runners on second and third in an 11-9 game

UP NEXT
Zack Godley (11-6, 4.61 ERA) will take his 4-0 career record against the Rockies into the D-backs' 5:10 p.m. MT game on Saturday. Godley, who has won six of his last seven decisions, has given up more than two earned runs only once in his last eight starts. The Rockies will send Kyle Freeland (8-6, 3.11) to the hill.

Jack Magruder is a contributor to MLB.com based in Phoenix.

Arizona Diamondbacks

D-backs unveil 20th anniversary team

MLB.com

PHOENIX -- Arizona made professional sports history in 2001 by becoming the first expansion team to win a championship as early as its fourth season, so it probably should come as no surprise that half of the members of the D-backs' 20th anniversary team announced Friday is from that special year.

Pitchers Randy Johnson and Curt Schilling, the co-MVPs of the 2001 World Series team that beat the New York Yankees in seven games, were named to the 16-man group as selected by fan voting.

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PHOENIX -- Arizona made professional sports history in 2001 by becoming the first expansion team to win a championship as early as its fourth season, so it probably should come as no surprise that half of the members of the D-backs' 20th anniversary team announced Friday is from that special year.

Pitchers Randy Johnson and Curt Schilling, the co-MVPs of the 2001 World Series team that beat the New York Yankees in seven games, were named to the 16-man group as selected by fan voting.

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Game 7 hero Luis Gonzalez, whose dramatic walk-off single over a drawn-in infield drove in Jay Bell with the winning run, also made the team. So did Bell and Matt Williams, who hugged Bell after he crossed the plate as manager Bob Brenly leaped over the dugout railing to join the celebration.

Brenly was chosen as the manager.

"In just two decades, the franchise has shared countless memories with our fans," D-backs President & CEO Derrick Hall said. "It is only fitting that they would be the ones to vote for the best players in our history, as each of these players has left an indelible mark on our state and our organization."

Johnson, who won four straight Cy Young awards after joining Arizona in 1999, leads a star-studded five-man rotation that includes fellow Cy Young winner Brandon Webb, Schilling, Zack Greinke and Patrick Corbin. Greinke and Corbin just returned from the All-Star Game.

Closers Jose Valverde and Brad Ziegler were selected as the two relievers. Valverde is the franchise leader in saves and Ziegler is the leader in appearances.

Miguel Montero, a two-time NL All-Star during his nine years in Arizona, was chosen to catch that staff. Montero played on the D-backs' NL West title team in 2011.

Gonzalez, who leads the franchise in nearly offensive category including homers and games played, is joined in the outfield by a pair of stellar center fielders in Steve Finley and A.J. Pollock. Finley also was a member of the 2001 World Series winner.

The infield includes All-Stars Paul Goldschmidt at first base, Bell at second and Williams at third. Shortstop Tony Womack, the franchise leader in stolen bases, also made his mark in Game 7 in 2001, contributing a game-tying double in the ninth inning that led to Gonzalez's game-winner.

Brenly guided the D-backs to division titles in 2001-02 and had a .536 winning percentage in his 3 1/2 years on the job. He was the first first-year manager since Ralph Houk to win a World Series in 2001.

Jack Magruder is a contributor to MLB.com based in Phoenix.

Arizona Diamondbacks

D-backs downplay potential humidor effects

Special to MLB.com

PHOENIX -- It was anticipated that the newly installed humidor would gently curtail the number of home runs hit at Chase Field this season. It has.

Manager Torey Lovullo and players say they have noticed that some balls have not traveled as far this season, especially early in the year. At the same time, they have chosen not to make even a small deal about it.

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PHOENIX -- It was anticipated that the newly installed humidor would gently curtail the number of home runs hit at Chase Field this season. It has.

Manager Torey Lovullo and players say they have noticed that some balls have not traveled as far this season, especially early in the year. At the same time, they have chosen not to make even a small deal about it.

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"There is probably data that will show all sorts of different things, but a couple of main bullet points I got -- the exit velocity [off the bat] is down a tick, less than a half-mile an hour," Lovullo said, calling it about two-tenths of one mile an hour.

"The home runs per fly ball are down, very noticeably. The 94-, 96-mile-an-hour exit-velocity home runs are no longer a part of what is going on here, no doubt about it. The ball to the corners, the lines, seems to be very similar. If you hit it, it is going to go.

"There have been some balls that have been hit in the middle of the diamond that may be a small difference, but there are also given days when somebody will back up a baseball that you think is going to be run down that didn't support anything my eyes were telling me.

"It's been a little bit inconsistent. Some days it goes and some days it doesn't. Is that the baseball? Is that the humidor? Is that the air? Is that the open-closed [roof]? I don't know."

The D-backs had 50 homers at home in 49 games before the All-Star break, 57 on the road. Their home pace is down quite a bit from the last two seasons, when they hit 122 at Chase in 2017 and 113 there in 2016. In the past 11 seasons, the D-backs have hit more homers on the road twice.

"Some days it travels and some days it doesn't," said center fielder A.J. Pollock, who has six of his 12 homers at home this season.

"I felt like in the beginning of the year, there were a couple of series where it really didn't travel. And there have been a couple of series when it has been OK. There were a couple of balls I thought I definitely got, but they kind of hang up. There have been other days when I hit it and it went as far as I thought it was going to go."

Daniel Descalso has nine homers in 87 games, five at home. He is on pace to break his career mark of 10 last season, his first with the D-backs, when he hit seven at Chase Field.

"I think there is definitely a difference," Descalso said. "The first month or so, it was a big topic of discussion among the players, but since then it hasn't been as much of a topic. I think we just decided it is something we are going to have to get used to.

"Definitely some balls aren't jumping out like they were in years past, but that's not something we have any control over. We have to go out and have good at-bats. We haven't had discussions on altering approach or hitting style.

"The balls that are homers are getting out. It's the ones that maybe snuck out that aren't getting out any more. But it hasn't been a distraction, and it hasn't been an excuse."

In general terms, the D-backs are having a down year offensively as compared to previous in seasons. They entered the post-break portion of the schedule eighth in runs, 10th in slugging, 12th in OPS and 14th in batting average.

Jack Magruder is a contributor to MLB.com based in Phoenix.

Arizona Diamondbacks

Goldy, Turner Ward maintain deep friendship

Dodgers hitting coach gifted All-Star's 2015 Silver Slugger Award
MLB.com @SteveGilbertMLB

Walk into Paul Goldschmidt's Phoenix-area home and you won't find any of the numerous baseball awards he's won during his eight years in the big leagues.

Ask to see one, though, and the D-backs first baseman will gladly let you. And while you look at it, he'll tell you about the teammates from that year who helped him win it. You'll hear tales about the veterans who welcomed him with open arms as a rookie in 2011 and helped mentor him. He'll remind you that there were coaches who worked hard to help him improve.

Walk into Paul Goldschmidt's Phoenix-area home and you won't find any of the numerous baseball awards he's won during his eight years in the big leagues.

Ask to see one, though, and the D-backs first baseman will gladly let you. And while you look at it, he'll tell you about the teammates from that year who helped him win it. You'll hear tales about the veterans who welcomed him with open arms as a rookie in 2011 and helped mentor him. He'll remind you that there were coaches who worked hard to help him improve.

"Any awards that I've won or success that I've had, a lot of people have contributed to it," Goldschmidt said. "It lets me tell a story about the year and my teammates and the people that helped me."

One award that is no longer in his possession is the 2015 National League Silver Slugger Award. That one belongs to Dodgers hitting coach Turner Ward. It tells the story of a deep friendship that began well before Goldschmidt became a six-time All-Star and seemingly annual MVP candidate.

Video: Paul Goldschmidt wins 2015 Silver Slugger Award

An early lesson that stuck

The first time their paths crossed in 2011, Ward was managing the D-backs' Double-A affiliate in Mobile, Ala. It was Goldschmidt's third year in the system after being selected in the eighth round of the 2009 Draft.

Ward had one ironclad rule, which he made clear early on: No excuses or complaining. That included things like the weather, the travel or missed calls by umpires.

"If he heard an excuse, no matter what it was, or any complaining, he would jump on it," Goldschmidt said. "It was the first time I kind of changed my mindset. It was the first time someone called me out and I realized how much I was worrying about stuff that didn't matter or was out of my control."

Reunited

Goldschmidt was called up to the big leagues in August 2011, and in September 2012, Ward got to spend the month as the D-backs' extra coach.

"I loved playing for him as a manager and learned a lot from him, but we didn't start connecting until he came up in September of 2012," Goldschmidt said. "That's when we first started spending a lot of time together."

The discussions started with baseball, but quickly progressed into talks about family, faith and life lessons.

"Goldy never stops learning," Ward said. "He is better than anyone I know at taking the strengths other people have and incorporating them into his own life."

How can I get better?

Ward was promoted to assistant hitting coach the following year. Near the midpoint of the season, Goldschmidt, who was on his way to winning his first Silver Slugger and finishing second in the NL MVP race, approached Ward.

"He asked, 'What do I need to do to get better?'" Ward said. "I told him to give me a couple of weeks and I'd get back to him. I wanted to make sure I had my thoughts together."

Ward laid out three areas of improvement for Goldschmidt. The first two dealt with his personal life and the third involved baseball. Each of the areas was then broken down into challenges.

"If you challenge him with something, he will take it on like no one I've ever seen," Ward said. "He's fearless of any challenge. He did everything we talked about."

Video: Paul Goldschmidt wins second career Gold Glove Award

The gift

When he won his second Silver Slugger and Gold Glove awards in 2015, Goldschmidt wanted to share them with those most important to him.

He gave his parents, David and Kim, his Gold Glove Award for all of the sacrifices they made for him growing up. The Silver Slugger went to Ward, along with a handwritten letter detailing just how much he meant to Goldschmidt.

"I thought it would be cool for Turner to have in his house," Goldschmidt said. "So if he showed it to people, he could tell them, 'Paul Goldschmidt gave me this award and we're very close and we've taught each other so many lessons and our relationship is growing and we're still staying in touch and still talking a lot.'

"Let me put it this way: If I didn't win any of my awards, I don't feel like my life would be any different. But if I hadn't met Turner, my life would be completely different. I wanted him to know how much I care about him and love him and how much he means to me. Yes, he had a big effect on my baseball career, but he completely changed my life trajectory."

Ward, who played parts of 12 seasons in the big leagues and has now managed or coached in pro ball for 11 years, said that influence goes both ways.

"I can honestly say that I've never been around a player as coachable, selfless and impactful than Paul," Ward says, his voice breaking a bit. "He makes everyone around him better and it's not by accident. He does it intentionally. I can't tell you how much he's meant to me."

Steve Gilbert has covered the D-backs for MLB.com since 2001. Follow him on Twitter @SteveGilbertMLB.

Arizona Diamondbacks, Paul Goldschmidt

D-backs unfazed with Machado in LA

Arizona reacts to Dodgers' big trade; 'Not like it's Babe Ruth'
Special to MLB.com

PHOENIX -- The D-backs were the Dodgers' primary division contender the last time a menacing Manny went West, in 2008. That time it was Manny Ramirez. This time, Manny Machado.

The D-backs, a half-game behind the Dodgers in the National League West at the All-Star break, still plan to show up. No demoralization here.

PHOENIX -- The D-backs were the Dodgers' primary division contender the last time a menacing Manny went West, in 2008. That time it was Manny Ramirez. This time, Manny Machado.

The D-backs, a half-game behind the Dodgers in the National League West at the All-Star break, still plan to show up. No demoralization here.

"It's just another guy whose name is on the lineup card," Arizona left-hander Robbie Ray said. "Just another scouting report you have to do.

"It's not like it's Babe Ruth."

The D-backs, who open the post-break portion of the schedule with a three-game series against Colorado at Chase Field starting Friday, made the biggest move for a bat in the division last year, adding J.D. Martinez.

Even if the front office doesn't make a move this season, the D-backs seem just fine with the group they have, believing a return to health for players such as A.J. Pollock, Ray and Steven Souza Jr. will be a big plus.

"Last year, [the front office] did something to make us better, and I imagine they are going to do that again," right-hander Archie Bradley said. "If they don't, the guys in here are good enough to do it. We'll wait and see. Our mindset right how is, we have the guys in this clubhouse and those are the guys we are going to go to battle with."

Tweet from @Dbacks: Reunited and ready for more. #GenerationDbacks pic.twitter.com/JFoXnMun3B

Dodgers right-hander Ross Stripling told reporters after the All-Star Game that he believed Machado's arrival would "be pretty demoralizing" to the other teams in the NL West.

"You want to talk about being demoralized, let's go back to May and the way we were playing [winning 2 of 17 games entering May 28]. That's demoralizing," Bradley said. "Another team making a big trade, we have to go play ball. Obviously it's going to make them better. He's a top five player in this game probably, but at the end of the day you still have to lay it all there on the line. You have to go out and compete."

The D-backs have had their projected middle-of-the-order group of Paul Goldschmidt, Pollock, Souza and Jake Lamb in the lineup for only the past several weeks because of injuries to all but Goldschmidt.

"The guys in here, including myself, just need to play the way we are capable of," Souza said. "As soon as we do that, we are a really good ballclub. Yeah, we've had an up-and-down year, but I still feel we are the team to beat in the division.

"[Machado] is a really good ballplayer, but we have a really good ballclub. He's only going to be able to bat four times in a game."

The D-backs were three games ahead of Los Angeles on July 31, 2008, when the Dodgers acquired Manny Ramirez, and they took over first place in the division with a three-game sweep of Arizona on Sept. 5-7.

Starting out
Ray will start the opener of the three-game series against the Rockies, manager Torey Lovullo said, with right-handers Zack Godley and Zack Greinke to follow. Patrick Corbin will start the opener of a four-game series against the Cubs in Chicago starting Monday.

Greinke (10-5, 3.18 ERA) and Corbin (6-4, 3.24) were All-Stars and went through the accompanying swirl despite not pitching in the game.

"We were trying to give Patrick and Zack some days down," Lovullo said. "They didn't have time off. It's a tough circumstance. We want to give them as much time off and proper rest mentally."

The D-backs will play 12 consecutive games before an off-day on Aug. 1, then will play seven more in a row in a homestand against San Francisco and Philadelphia. They have not announced a starter for the second game of the Cubs' series on Tuesday.

Miller's MRI results encouraging
Arizona received some good news regarding right-hander Shelby Miller.

Miller, removed from his last start because of forearm tightness, did not incur any new damage to his right ulnar collateral ligament, Dr. Neal ElAttrache reported after reading the recent MRI.

Miller will be shut down for another week or so, the D-backs said Thursday. He underwent Tommy John surgery last May and missed the rest of 2017 before returning to the rotation in June. He is 0-4 with an 11.40 ERA in four starts.

Jack Magruder is a contributor to MLB.com based in Phoenix.

Arizona Diamondbacks

Post-Manny deals to look for in the NL West

MLB.com @AJCassavell

The days leading up to the July 31 non-waiver Trade Deadline always feature a handful of twists and turns. Even for those involved in the day-to-day operations of clubs, the Deadline can be hard to predict.

That said, we can narrow the scope of what might happen with a small bit of information. What are teams looking for? Which players might fit best?

The days leading up to the July 31 non-waiver Trade Deadline always feature a handful of twists and turns. Even for those involved in the day-to-day operations of clubs, the Deadline can be hard to predict.

That said, we can narrow the scope of what might happen with a small bit of information. What are teams looking for? Which players might fit best?

Recently, MLB.com asked a handful of front-office and scouting types about the needs surrounding every club in the National League West. 

D-backs
The D-backs' offense struggled early this season, but the consensus seems to be that it's likelier they will look to acquire pitching help. The rotation has taken a step back from last year's group, and the bullpen -- while solid -- could stand to add some depth.

NL front-office member: "Diamondbacks need pitching, both rotation and in the bullpen. Even though their offense has been kind of shaky, they're getting [A.J.] Pollock back, and I don't think they're looking at any major offensive upgrades. I don't think that's what they're looking for unless it's someone with years of control. But what they're really looking for is pitching."

Dodgers
The Dodgers landed Manny Machado officially on Wednesday night. Now, it's a safe bet their focus will shift to adding bullpen help. Kenley Jansen has been Kenley Jansen for the past 2 1/2 months. But the rest of the 'pen has been substandard compared with the group that helped bring them an NL pennant last season.

AL front-office member: "Dodgers will acquire Machado … Then they will also be looking for help in the 'pen."

Video: Farhan Zaidi on acquiring Machado from the Orioles

Giants
The Giants aren't a complete team by any stretch. But they might have a hard time adding a big-name piece at the Trade Deadline. They could use some pitching help, but they're already close to the luxury tax threshold and are firmly committed to staying below that mark.

AL front-office member: "They have a mandate from ownership to not get to the Competitive Balance Tax in 2018. That is why they made a recent deal with Texas to get further down, giving up a good prospect to do it. Giants need some veterans to step it up offensively in the second half, most notably [Hunter] Pence, [Andrew] McCutchen, [Joe] Panik, and should have [Evan] Longoria back in August. They'd like to add another bullpen arm, and with some rotation inconsistency, are scouting for starters, a challenge given their CBT mandate."

Padres
The Padres are the NL West's only sellers. And they've got quite a few pieces that could be on the move, most notably lefty closer Brad Hand -- who was dealt along with Adam Cimber to the Indians on Thursday for elite catching prospect Francisco Mejia -- and righty starter Tyson Ross. They're looking to bolster an already loaded farm system, and they're off to a great start.

NL scout: "They're fine, pitching-wise. Most of those guys are a couple years away. But if they're going to get prospects, I'd guess they want a hitter. I think long-term, it's the offense that needs help. Their pitching will be very good."

Rockies
Two weeks ago, the Rockies weren't yet certain if they'd be buyers or sellers at the Trade Deadline. Then they went 10-2 in that stretch, and it certainly sounds as though they're leaning toward the former. Colorado could use some help in a handful of areas, but it isn't desperate to upgrade on any specific spot.

NL front-office member: "The Rockies have been more focused on pitching. I think they've talked a little bit about adding a bat that can move around, play multiple positions, just help out offensively. It hasn't been real specific -- like, 'We have to replace a first baseman or a left fielder. … They're also just looking for general pitching help."

AJ Cassavell covers the Padres for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter @ajcassavell.

Goldy starts at DH in 'great experience' at ASG

Corbin, Greinke don't pitch, but enjoy All-Star festivities
MLB.com @JesseSanchezMLB

WASHINGTON -- Paul Goldschmidt's bat has been the focus of conversations in Arizona all year.

It was a hot topic when it went cold to start the season, and it was the center of attention last month when the D-backs first baseman began hitting again.

View Full Game Coverage

WASHINGTON -- Paul Goldschmidt's bat has been the focus of conversations in Arizona all year.

It was a hot topic when it went cold to start the season, and it was the center of attention last month when the D-backs first baseman began hitting again.

View Full Game Coverage

On Tuesday at the All-Star Game presented by Mastercard -- which the American League won by outslugging the National League, 8-6 -- the eyes of the baseball world were on Goldschmidt, and the slugger again demonstrated his concentration on the process and not the results, only this time in front of 43,843 fans at Nationals Park and millions watching across the globe.

Goldschmidt, who hit third as the NL's designated hitter, struck out swinging on a slider from American League starter Chris Sale in the first inning in his first at-bat. He rebounded next time up when he faced Rays starter Blake Snell in the third and walked on six pitches.

It was a symbolic performance for Goldschmidt. The first baseman, who was hitting .198 on May 22, is hitting .369 with 10 doubles, one triple, 14 home runs, 33 RBIs, 25 walks and 30 runs scored since June 1 because of his ability to adjust.

"There's something that I have taken away from the experience each year," Goldschmidt said. "This year, it's definitely a big honor that the coaching staff thought highly enough of me to put me in the starting lineup as the DH when there are so many great guys that can hit. I appreciate that."

Goldschmidt is 2-for-15 in six career All-Star Games, with his last hit coming in 2015. He was replaced in the fifth when Cardinals catcher Yadier Molina entered as a pinch-hitter.

"It's just so fun to be able to go out and compete against the best in the game," Goldschmidt said. "It's always a great experience."

Left-hander Patrick Corbin, who was an All-Star for the second time and for the first time since 2013, didn't pitch, and he didn't expect to after he started Sunday against the Braves. He still bought 18 tickets for family members and friends, so they could take in the experience with him.

"They let me know that I was the last resort type of thing, but I prepared to pitch just in case," Corbin said. "It's still been so fun being here and being able to enjoy it. It's a great time."

Right-hander Zack Greinke, who was selected to the All-Star Game for the fifth time, also didn't pitch. The veteran threw a season-high 7 2/3 innings against the Braves on Saturday in his last start, and the D-backs need a rested Greinke for the second half of the season.

The D-backs, who trail the Dodgers by a half-game in the National League West, resume play Friday with a three-game series against the Rockies at Chase Field. Arizona ended the first half strong, winning 14 of its last 19 games.

"I go into it expecting it to be a really tough battle in the second half," Greinke said. "There's a lot of competition, and we need to be focused the whole entire time or else it will be tough for us to make it if we don't keep the foot on the pedal the entire time. Our division is very tough, and it's not just one team we are competing against, it's multiple teams."

The trio of D-backs All-Stars are optimistic for good reason. Their 53 wins at the All-Star break are the most in team history for the second consecutive year, and their 17 series wins before the break is also a franchise record.

"We're excited about the group of guys we have going forward, and we probably could have had a couple of bullpen guys [at the All-Star Game] and David Peralta as well," Corbin said. "Having Robbie Ray come back and with A.J. Pollock, we have a really strong group of guys who believe our best baseball is ahead of us."

Jesse Sanchez, who has been writing for MLB.com since 2001, is a national reporter based in Phoenix. Follow him on Twitter @JesseSanchezMLB and Facebook.

Arizona Diamondbacks, Patrick Corbin, Paul Goldschmidt, Zack Greinke

On record-setting night, AL outslugs NL

MLB.com @castrovince

WASHINGTON -- The ball wasn't flying out of Nationals Park quite as frequently as it did during Bryce Harper's heroic hometown homer binge a night earlier, but it was flying all the same in a dinger-driven, record-breaking 89th All-Star Game presented by Mastercard on Tuesday night.

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WASHINGTON -- The ball wasn't flying out of Nationals Park quite as frequently as it did during Bryce Harper's heroic hometown homer binge a night earlier, but it was flying all the same in a dinger-driven, record-breaking 89th All-Star Game presented by Mastercard on Tuesday night.

Video: 2018 All-Star Game sets new record with 10 home runs

View Full Game Coverage

In the end, the two standout swats were the back-to-back solo shots hit by Astros teammates Alex Bregman and George Springer -- off a Dodgers pitcher (Ross Stripling), no less -- in the top of the 10th inning of what became an 8-6 victory for the American League.

Video: 2018 ASG: Bregman wins MVP, gives car to his mother

Bregman was given the Ted Williams Most Valuable Player Award presented by Chevrolet for his role in the AL's sixth straight win in the Midsummer Classic.

"I took a cutter down the middle of the first pitch and kind of went into battle mode and just was trying to put a line drive in play, and it left the yard," said Bregman. "It was crazy. It was a lot of fun."

But while the result reflects the AL's recent dominance in this summer showcase and, in a way, the Astros' standing as defending champs, the game itself was reflective of the homer-happy times we live in.

Video: 2018 ASG: AL bash 5 homers to earn extra-innings win

"It was like a regular-season game with the home runs accounting for pretty much everything," said Blue Jays pitcher J.A. Happ, who made a rare turn in the "closer" role by getting the save in the 10th. "Maybe a few less walks than normal, but pretty standard stuff. We were commenting in the bullpen that that's the way it's going these days."

The two teams combined for 10 homers, destroying the previous record of six that had last been reached in 1971 by some gentlemen named Johnny Bench, Hank Aaron, Reggie Jackson, Frank Robinson, Harmon Killebrew and Roberto Clemente -- Hall of Famers, all.

Video: 2018 ASG: NL crush 5 home runs in Washington, D.C.

Maybe not all of the blasts on this night were hit by guys who are Cooperstown-bound. But Bregman, Springer, Aaron Judge, Mike Trout, Willson Contreras, Trevor Story, Jean Segura, Christian Yelich, Scooter Gennett and Joey Votto collectively put up a performance for the All-Star ages. All but one of the game's 14 runs was driven in by a long ball.

Video: 2018 ASG: Segura clobbers a go-ahead 3-run HR

"To kind of empty your tank and hit homers at this event is probably the best thing imaginable," said AL and Astros manager AJ Hinch. "Just to have that kind of emotion that comes with the home run. Especially when the big boys hit it, and especially when the Astros hit it."

Video: 2018 ASG: Hinch on Bregman, Springer in All-Star Game

The AL seemingly had the game in hand thanks to Segura's pinch-hit three-run homer off Josh Hader in the top of the eighth. But Gennett wowed the crowd and stunned the junior circuit by taking Mariners closer Edwin Diaz deep in the bottom of the ninth to tie it.

To extras it went, and it didn't take long for Bregman and Springer to summon the Fall Classic magic of old. The AL added another run on -- of all things -- a sacrifice fly from Michael Brantley. And though Votto's solo shot in the bottom of the 10th kept things interesting, Happ was able to close it out before any more dinger drama developed.

Video: 2018 ASG: Sale K's 1 in scoreless 1st inning

So this was a night for watching it fly and letting it fly. AL starter Chris Sale threw a fastball clocked by Statcast™ at 100.7 mph -- his fastest pitch since 2010. NL starter Max Scherzer threw his four fastest pitches of the season en route to striking out four in two innings of work.

Video: 2018 ASG: Scherzer fans 4 batters in ASG start

The All-Stars capitalized on their opportunity to showcase their skills in the nation's capital, and they let their personalities show, too, with in-game selfies and mic'd-up position players. Indians shortstop Francisco Lindor felt so bad when he couldn't muscle a drive over the wall that he dropped down and did some pushups. It was that kind of night.

Video: 2018 ASG: Lindor hits the grass for some pushups

There was even some off-the-field drama developing, with reports swirling about Manny Machado possibly heading to the Dodgers as he played what might have been his last game in a Baltimore Orioles uniform. In an in-game interview with FOX Sports and MLB Network insider Ken Rosenthal, Machado acknowledged the not-so-subtle storyline by saying, "If this is the last time, hopefully I treated them well, I did everything I could for the organization."

Video: 2018 ASG: Machado talks All-Star Game, trade rumors

The AL could be losing one of its signature stars. But it won a game that very much resembled a Derby.

MOMENTS THAT MATTERED
Gennett's game-tying homer might get lost to history, given the end result, but he still put himself in a pretty cool spot in the All-Star history books. When he hit his two-run, 396-foot blast off Diaz, Gennett became just the third player to hit a game-tying home run in the ninth inning of a Midsummer Classic, joining Ralph Kiner in 1950 and Fred McGriff in '94. That sent the All-Star Game into extras for a second consecutive year. The last time that had happened was 1966-67.

Video: 2018 ASG: Gennett hits game-tying HR in the 9th

SOUND SMART
This was the first game in MLB history -- regular season, postseason or All-Star -- in which five players homered for each team.

HE SAID IT
"In the beginning, it was, 'Is anybody going to get a hit other than a homer?' And at the end, it was, 'Are we going to have enough pitching to get out of this mess?'" -- Hinch

UP NEXT
Oh yes, they'll meet again. The 90th All-Star Game will take place on July 9, 2019, at Cleveland's Progressive Field, which last hosted the Midsummer Classic in 1997 (when it was still known as Jacobs Field). The AL will take an All-Star edge into that contest, having broken the all-time tie Tuesday by improving to 44-43-2 against the NL.

Anthony Castrovince has been a reporter for MLB.com since 2004. Read his columns, listen to his podcast and follow him on Twitter at @Castrovince.

Alex Bregman, Willson Contreras, Scooter Gennett, Aaron Judge, Jean Segura, George Springer, Trevor Story, Mike Trout, Joey Votto, Christian Yelich

Group effort turned slumping Goldy into All-Star

MLB.com @SteveGilbertMLB

Right up until D-backs manager Torey Lovullo delivered the news, first baseman Paul Goldschmidt did not think he would be heading to his sixth straight All-Star Game presented by Mastercard.

Certainly not on May 22, when he was hitting just .198 and had those in baseball wondering what in the world was going on with him. Goldschmidt is not only an All-Star again, he's hitting third in the lineup as the National League's designated hitter. Pitchers Zack Greinke and Patrick Corbin are the D-backs' other representatives.

Right up until D-backs manager Torey Lovullo delivered the news, first baseman Paul Goldschmidt did not think he would be heading to his sixth straight All-Star Game presented by Mastercard.

Certainly not on May 22, when he was hitting just .198 and had those in baseball wondering what in the world was going on with him. Goldschmidt is not only an All-Star again, he's hitting third in the lineup as the National League's designated hitter. Pitchers Zack Greinke and Patrick Corbin are the D-backs' other representatives.

"Growing up, I never imagined I would make it to the league, much less an All-Star Game, so this is something I don't take for granted," Goldschmidt said. "I'm really happy to be here."

:: Complete All-Star Game coverage ::

Goldschmidt overcame his struggles at the plate by working with D-backs hitting coach Dave Magadan, assistant hitting coach Tim Laker and hitting strategist Robert Van Scoyoc. The work paid off.

"It wasn't like I was hitting balls hard and getting out, so you couldn't say it was just bad luck," Goldschmidt said. "I was legitimately not playing well, not having good at-bats, not swinging at the right pitches, and when I did get a pitch to hit, I wasn't hitting it hard enough."

The 30-year-old spent time individually with each of the coaches working in the batting cage. He spent time with each of them individually looking at video. Then, he worked in the cage with them as a group and looked at video with all three of them.

"I was doing everything I could," Goldschmidt said. "That's when I really had to make sure I was focusing on what I could control -- what I was doing in the cage, my batting practice, my mindset, the process, the preparation, and then what the results were, well, I knew I couldn't try any harder."

Tweet from @Dbacks: Five years ago today, these two participated in their first #AllStarGame. #GenerationDbacks pic.twitter.com/1SlajLeA6L

That he was struggling was frustrating for Goldschmidt, but what really got under his skin was that his massive slump came at a time when his team was desperate for offense while losing 15 of 17 games.

Finally, Goldschmidt walked into Lovullo's office and asked him to please not make any more excuses for him when he talked with the media.

"Just tell them I suck," Goldschmidt told Lovullo.

After Lovullo relayed the message, Goldschmidt stood in front of his locker and repeated the phrase for reporters.

"It bothered me that the coaches were having to put in more work to help me," Goldschmidt remembered. "You don't want to make your teammates' and your coaches' jobs harder. You want to make them easier. And I was making things more difficult for everybody, and that was what was the hardest thing for me."

Video: ARI@COL: Goldschmidt belts a solo home run to left

Then, around May 28, things began to change. Goldschmidt picked up a couple of hits here, one hit there.

"It felt better, but still just a little off," Goldschmidt said.

On June 5, it all finally came together as he got three hits against the Giants, and over a five-game stretch Goldschmidt calls the best of his career, he slashed .682/.720/1.591, with four homers.

After having the worst month of his career in May with a .144 average, he hit .364 with 10 homers in June and was named NL Player of the Month.

Everyone wants to know what change Goldschmidt made that led to such a turnaround, but there are no easy answers to that question.

Video: Corbin, Goldy on going to the 2018 All-Star Game

"It's hard to explain," Goldschmidt said. "I think the biggest thing was I was able to get in a better hitting position, which allows everything to work together off that. Whereas if you're not in a good hitting position, it can lead to your head moving, your front shoulder coming out, your timing being off, whatever. It all reverts back to your base -- being in a good position to hit. It's not like we didn't know that, or do things to try and get back to that. I guarantee we tried everything, and finally something just really clicked."

And for that, Goldschmidt is grateful to Magadan, Laker and Van Scoyoc.

"Man, I don't even want to know the amount of hours they spent watching video when I wasn't around trying to find something that would help me," Goldschmidt said. "Me making the All-Star Game this year would not have happened without all three of those guys."

Steve Gilbert has covered the D-backs for MLB.com since 2001. Follow him on Twitter @SteveGilbertMLB.

Arizona Diamondbacks, Paul Goldschmidt

Corbin, Greinke journeys lead to ASG return

MLB.com @SteveGilbertMLB

For Patrick Corbin, his selection to the 2018 All-Star Game presented by Mastercard was validation that he had finally come all the way back from his '14 Tommy John surgery.

It has been quite a journey for Corbin. He still remembers that day four years ago when he found out his ulnar collateral ligament was torn.

For Patrick Corbin, his selection to the 2018 All-Star Game presented by Mastercard was validation that he had finally come all the way back from his '14 Tommy John surgery.

It has been quite a journey for Corbin. He still remembers that day four years ago when he found out his ulnar collateral ligament was torn.

As Corbin recalls, his D-backs teammates -- like fellow All-Star Paul Goldschmidt -- finished packing the last items they would need for the 15-hour flight for Australia later that night while he stood behind a podium in the team's interview room fighting back tears as he explained to the gathered media that not only would he not be able to start that game, but he also would miss at least a full season because of the procedure.

Afterwards, Corbin paced on a backfield at Salt River Fields in Arizona talking on the phone. An All-Star in 2013, Corbin knew the road ahead was going to be tough. Being selected for the '18 Midsummer Classic? That could not have entered his mind.

"You know how long you're going to be out for and how long of a rehab process it is," Corbin said. "So that's what you think about."

Video: Corbin, Goldy on going to the 2018 All-Star Game

Even when Corbin was able to finally return to the mound midway through the 2015 season, it took a lot longer than that before he fully felt like his old self.

Corbin pitched well in spurts, but it wasn't until the final couple of months of 2017 when things really started to click for him as he incorporated a slower breaking ball to go with his fastball and hard slider.

"I know I always had it in there," Corbin said. "Just took a little bit to figure out and get back. I feel really close to where I was, if not there, so just ready to get out there."

Tweet from @PatrickCorbin46: Excited to rep @Dbacks at the @MLB #AllStarGame. Thanks fans for all the support. pic.twitter.com/aHM56nImvN

Meanwhile, veteran right-hander Zack Greinke's fifth trip to the Midsummer Classic was a surprise to him given how he threw this spring.

"It's neat to actually be considered one of the best players in the world, on top of just being in the Major Leagues," Greinke said. "As a pitcher, very rarely do you find someone that is capable of doing four or five straight years or even two straight years. It's not easy to do."

This spring, Greinke did not feel close to the standard he had set over his illustrious career. His velocity down and his command off, a 34-year-old Greinke admitted he wasn't sure where he stood.

"It was extra bad this year," Greinke said of his spring. "It started working a little better. That last [exhibition] game against Cleveland, I still was throwing really slow, but at least I was throwing the ball where I wanted it. So it kind of got a little bit better then. Still, the stuff wasn't as good as it's been before."

Video: ARI@ATL: Greinke dazzles over 7 2/3 scoreless innings

The D-backs pushed back Greinke's first start of the season, and it was Corbin who took his place on Opening Day.

Greinke, meanwhile, steeled himself for possible failure heading into that first start.

"More afraid-of-failure type of thing," Greinke said. "I was just trying to not get upset if I gave up 10 runs a game and just trying to do as good as I could. That was kind of my goal going into the season was to keep a good mindset with whatever happens."

Keeping that mindset has not been hard as Greinke regained his pinpoint control and, along with knowledge gleaned over his 15 years in the big leagues, he is once again performing at a high level.

"As long as I can throw the ball where I want, I should be able to get some outs, at least," Greinke said. "It's not always that easy, either. So we'll see."

Steve Gilbert has covered the D-backs for MLB.com since 2001. Follow him on Twitter @SteveGilbertMLB.

Arizona Diamondbacks, Patrick Corbin, Zack Greinke

Lopez K's only batter faced in Futures Game

MLB.com @DKramer_

The 20th edition of the SiriusXM All-Star Futures Game had no shortage of big moments, with the two sides combining for eight home runs -- doubling the previous Futures Game record -- as Team USA outslugged the World, 10-6, on All-Star Sunday at Nationals Park.

The 20th edition of the SiriusXM All-Star Futures Game had no shortage of big moments, with the two sides combining for eight home runs -- doubling the previous Futures Game record -- as Team USA outslugged the World, 10-6, on All-Star Sunday at Nationals Park.

:: 2018 Futures Game coverage ::

Below is a recap of each player's performance, with a breakdown of each club's representatives.

ANGELS
Jo Adell, OF, LAA No. 1 | MLB No. 36
Adell went 1-for-4, but it wasn't for a lack of contact, which has been a concern early in his career. Adell grounded out to Fernando Tatis Jr. in the first, then popped out twice and hit a sac fly.

Box score

ASTROS
Yordan Alvarez, OF/1B, HOU No. 3 | MLB No. 51
Playing in his second straight Futures Game, Alvarez went 1-for-3 with a walk, and he drew widespread attention, both on the field and in the social realms, for his 6-foot-5, 225-pound frame.

ATHLETICS
Jesus Luzardo, LHP, OAK No. 1 | MLB No. 20
Luzardo started for the World Team and pitched the first two innings, giving up three hits and an earned run in the first inning. Luzardo reached 97 mph on his four-seamer, while showing movement on many of his secondary pitches, particularly the two-seamer and slider. As he has over parts of his young career, Luzardo struggled with command. But scouting reports suggest that once Luzardo finds control, he possesses top-of-the-rotation stuff.

Video: WLD@USA: Luzardo strikes out Hiura, Jansen in the 2nd

BLUE JAYS
Bo Bichette, SS/2B, TOR No. 2 | MLB No. 7
Toronto's incredibly talented hitter finished 1-for-3 with a 102.2-mph ground-ball single off Bryan Mata in the third inning. He also got a bit of a surprise in the first inning, when Luzardo quick-pitched him into a flyout.

Danny Jansen, C, TOR No. 6
Jansen sparked a USA rally in the fourth by launching a changeup up and out for a 381-foot game-tying home run to left, which was quickly followed up by Ke'Bryan Hayes' tater to left-center. Toronto's top catching prospect finished 1-for-2 with two runs driven in.

Video: WLD@USA: Jansen clubs a two-run homer to left field

BRAVES
Kyle Wright, RHP, ATL No. 2 | MLB No. 25
Inheriting runners at first and third and no outs in the top of the eighth, Wright induced a flyout from Miguel Amaya and a double play from Andres Gimenez to escape the jam.

Touki Toussaint, RHP, ATL No. 10
A day after being promoted to the World Team roster as a late addition, Toussaint twirled the eighth inning, giving up a triple to Taylor Trammel -- which many, including Trammel, thought was headed to the bleachers before pegging into the center-field wall. Toussaint, who was recently promoted to Triple-A Gwinnett and led the Southern League (Double-A) in strikeouts at the time of his promotion, sat in the high-90s with his two-seamer, dropped 10 mph on his changeup and dropped another 10 mph on his curveball, which he threw just once.

BREWERS
Keston Hiura, 2B, MIL No. 1 | MLB No. 30
Hiura's hitting ability has helped his name come up often with the non-waiver Trade Deadline looming, but he struck out in each of his two plate appearances Sunday.

Luis Ortiz, RHP, MIL No. 4
Ortiz was the last player on either roster to enter the game, doing so with two outs in the top of the ninth against Yusniel Diaz, who had homered twice already. Ortiz threw one pitch, a 95.4-mph four-seamer, that induced a groundout to end the game.

Video: WLD@USA: Ortiz gets Diaz to ground out to end 9th

CARDINALS
Dakota Hudson, RHP, STL No. 3

Hudson made the most of his 11 pitches over a perfect sixth inning. His fastball never dropped below 96 mph, and his slider fooled Keibert Ruiz for a strikeout. That specific combination is why there might be a spot for him in the Cardinals' bullpen at some point.

Andrew Knizner, C, STL No. 5
Days after he was added to the Team USA roster as as an injury replacement for A's catcher Sean Murphy, Knizner entered in the sixth to catch for fellow Cards prospect Hudson. The 23-year-old Knizner, who is hitting .310/.376/.418 between Double-A Springfield and Triple-A Memphis, went 0-for-2 with a pair of strikeouts.

Randy Arozarena, OF, STL. No. 7
Arozarena entered in the bottom of the seventh and got just one at-bat. He reached on a fielding error by USA first baseman and Mets prospect Peter Alonso.

CUBS
Miguel Amaya, C/1B, CHC No. 10
Amaya went 0-for-2 at the plate after starting at catcher for the World Team.

D-BACKS
Yoan Lopez, RHP, ARI No. 25
Lopez faced just one batter -- entering with two outs in the bottom of the fifth and the game tied at 5 -- striking out Ryan Mountcastle on three fastballs clocked at 96.4, 96.0 and 97.2 mph.

Video: WLD@USA: Lopez gets Mountcastle swinging in the 5th

DODGERS
Keibert Ruiz, C, LAD No. 2 | MLB No. 44
Ruiz, whose name has been linked to Manny Machado trade rumors, left the game after getting clocked on his right hand by a foul ball. X-rays were negative, according to the Los Angeles Times. At the dish, Ruiz struck out in his lone at-bat during the sixth inning.

Yusniel Diaz, OF, LAD No. 4 | MLB No. 85
Diaz entered the game with just six homers over the entire season with Double-A Tulsa. He added another pair on Sunday -- a 409-foot blast in the fifth and a 408-foot shot in the seventh. Diaz became just the second player to homer twice in Futures Game history and was one of just five players to remain in the game from start to finish.

Video: WLD@USA: Diaz clobbers 2-run jack, game-tying HR

GIANTS
Shaun Anderson, RHP, SF No. 7
Anderson gave up a solo home run to Diaz in the seventh, but wound up being the winning pitcher after Team USA powered to a lead it wouldn't relinquish in the following frame. Anderson, who will be promoted to Triple-A Sacramento to start the second half, also gave up a hit to fellow Giants prospect Heliot Ramos just after surrendering the homer.

Heliot Ramos, OF, SF No. 1 | MLB No. 70
Ramos laced a single off fellow Giants prospect Anderson in the seventh in his lone at-bat. He didn't see any action in the field since he entered the game as the designated hitter.

INDIANS
Kieran Lovegrove, RHP
Lovegrove entered Sunday having faced 100 hitters this year without giving up a homer. That ended when Trammel -- the first batter Lovegrove faced -- launched a 438-foot laser to straightaway center. Over his brief appearance in the sixth inning, Lovegrove faced one more batter, recorded an out, then was pulled.

MARINERS
Kyle Lewis, OF, SEA No. 1 | MLB No. 58
Lewis went 0-for-1 with a flyout to right in his first at-bat, a walk and a run scored, courtesy of Hayes' deep fly to left in the fourth frame, and he didn't see any action in the field.

MARLINS
Jorge Guzman, RHP, MIA No. 3
Guzman, who many will identify as a key return in the Giancarlo Stanton trade, flashed his raw stuff to the three batters he faced, throwing 10 pitches -- all between 96.8 and 99.7 mph -- with one strikeout.

Tweet from @Marlins: Hitters have 99 problems and they're all miles per hour.Jorge Guzman was all 🔥 at the Futures Game. #JustGettinStarted pic.twitter.com/tw6iYWWnSm

METS
Andres Gimenez, SS, NYM No. 1 | MLB No. 68
Gimenez went 0-for-2 with a pair of groundouts, including an inning-ending double play in the eighth with runners on first and third.

Tweet from @JesseSanchezMLB: No big deal. It���s just a Hall of Famer sharing hitting tips with a young prospect. This might be the biggest moment of Andres Gimenez���s pro career. #FuturesGame. #Mets pic.twitter.com/ShXlU7IUTW

Peter Alonso, 1B, NYM No. 2 | MLB No. 69
Eager to join in the power party, Alonso gave Mets fans a glimpse of what could be to come when he launched a 415-foot homer to left. The deep fly was scorched at 113.6 mph and lifted at a 46-degree launch angle, according to Statcast™. Yoenis Cespedes is the only Mets player to hit a homer with a higher exit velocity this year.

Video: WLD@USA: Alonso's 415-foot home run down the line

NATIONALS
Carter Kieboom, SS, WSH No. 2 | MLB No. 62
Kieboom didn't quite have the homecoming he was hoping for, going 0-for-2 with a pair of strikeouts, including one looking on a 78.6-mph curveball from Toussaint.

Luis Garcia, SS/2B, WSH No. 5
Garcia drew a walk in his lone plate appearance during the eighth inning, while also contributing three-plus innings at second base.

ORIOLES
Ryan Mountcastle, 3B, BAL No. 1 | MLB No. 80
Mountcastle, who could be a huge part of the post-Machado Orioles, went 0-for-2 with a strikeout against Lopez and a flyout against Guzman.

Alex Wells, LHP BAL No. 8
Wells faced only Buddy Reed and Knizner and got each out quickly, throwing just nine pitches. Reed nearly took Wells deep, flying out to the left-field wall, but Wells quickly bounced back to strike out Knizner on three called strikes in a row.

PADRES
Fernando Tatis Jr., SS, SD No. 1 | MLB No. 3
Tatis laced a 102.3-mph heater from Hunter Greene for a 107.1-mph single to right, then swiped second during the next at-bat, putting his plus speed on display with a Sprint Speed of 28.4 feet per second, per Statcast™, well above the Major League average of 27.0.

Video: WLD@USA: Tatis Jr. rips a single off a 102-mph heater

Luis Urias, 2B/SS, SD No. 3 | MLB No. 29
Urias had an unfortunate run-in with a 100.4-mph fastball on his left elbow, though he was wearing a protective guard. Urias struck out in his other two plate appearances, and was pulled in the bottom of the fifth.

Buddy Reed, OF
Reed, who just this week was called up to Double-A San Antonio after clubbing 12 homers from Class A Advanced Lake Elsinore, narrowly missed a deep fly in the sixth, having lifted one 346 feet to the wall in left in a full count against Wells. However, Reed made up for it in the field in the following frame, robbing Tatis of what would've been his third hit with a running grab in right-center.

Video: WLD@USA: Reed on his mom, playing hockey

PHILLIES
Adonis Medina, RHP, PHI No. 2 | MLB No. 74
Medina's wild pitch in the seventh inning broke a 6-6 tie and gave Team USA a lead it wouldn't relinquish. The right-hander lost control of a two-seamer that landed in the dirt and allowed Adell to score from third. He also gave up a mammoth blast to Alonso, getting tagged for three runs in a third of an inning, but he did show glimpses of his nasty stuff on his two strikeouts.

Video: WLD@USA: Medina K's Kieboom swinging in the 7th

PIRATES
Mitch Keller, RHP, PIT No. 1 | MLB No. 12
Keller tossed a perfect first inning on eight pitches, striking out Luis Alexander Basabe to lead off the game, then inducing a pair of flyouts. Keller topped out on his four-seam fastball at 99.5 mph.

Video: WLD@USA: Keller K's Basabe, retires the side in order

Ke'Bryan Hayes, 3B, PIT No. 3
Hayes, son of 14-year MLB veteran Charlie Hayes, launched a 405-foot homer deep to the left-field bleachers to complete back-to-back deep flies with Jansen, putting Team USA up by two in the fourth. Team USA manager Torii Hunter, being interviewed at the time of Hayes' homer was ecstatic.

Video: WLD@USA: Hunter cheers on Team USA at Futures Game

RANGERS
C.D. Pelham, LHP, TEX No. 19
Pelham walked the first batter he faced, narrowly missing ball four on an inside fastball at 97.9 mph, then got into more trouble when Arozarena reached on an error by first baseman Alonso, putting runners on the corners. That'd be it for Pelham after that, though Wright helped bail him out of the jam.

Leody Taveras, OF, TEX No. 1 | MLB No. 28
Taveras went 0-for-2 with a popup and a groundout, and finished the game after entering as the World Team's center fielder in the bottom of the sixth.

RAYS
Nate Lowe, 1B
Lowe laced an RBI single off Luzardo with two outs in the first that scored Brendan Rodgers to put Team USA up, 1-0, in the opening frame.

Video: WLD@USA: Lowe opens the scoring with an RBI single

Jesus Sanchez, OF, TB No. 4 | MLB No. 35
Sanchez went 0-for-3, grounding into a pair of double plays and flying out to center off a slider from Justus Sheffield in the second inning. His stat sheet won't show it, but Sanchez impressed with a fluid swing from the left side.

RED SOX
Bryan Mata, RHP, BOS No. 4
The 19-year-old, as he has much of this season, had to battle traffic and command, but he left after tossing a scoreless third inning. Mata sat at an impressive 95 mph on his two-seam fastball, and complemented his heat with varying speeds in the high-70s on his curve, though he got just one swing-and-miss on 31 pitches.

REDS
Hunter Greene, RHP, CIN No. 2 | MLB No. 18
The Reds' flamethrower maxed out the radar gun, throwing all 19 of his fastballs above 100 mph and averaging 101.3 mph. Heat alone wasn't enough to keep Basabe from homering and Tatis from following up with a single -- both off 102.3-mph pitches -- but the ease with which Greene delivered his triple-digit velocity was mighty impressive nonetheless.

Video: WLD@USA: Greene talks playing in Futures Game

Taylor Trammell, OF, CIN No. 3 | MLB No. 34
With raw athleticism that stood out during a 38-touchdown season as a high school football star in 2015, Trammell got the chance to put his tools on display. And he didn't disappoint. Cincinnati's No. 35 overall pick in '16, Trammell launched a 107.9-mph homer that traveled a projected 438 feet -- the deepest of the eight homers hit in the game.

Trammell nearly got hold of another one -- and thought he did, given his reaction -- with a fly ball off the center-field wall in the eighth inning, gesturing to the USA dugout as he rounded first, only to settle for a triple. He was named the Futures Game MVP.

Video: WLD@USA: Trammell clubs HR, wins Futures Game MVP

ROCKIES
Brendan Rodgers, SS, COL No. 1 | MLB No. 6
Rodgers roped a Statcast-projected 108.7-mph double into the left-center-field gap with two outs and in a full count, then scored during the ensuing at-bat by Lowe to put Team USA on board first. Rodgers chased an outside curveball from Mata in his second at-bat during the third inning for a strikeout.

Jesus Tinoco, RHP, COL No. 12
Tinoco induced a groundout to Double-A Hartford teammate Rodgers as part of a three-up, three-down, nine-pitch outing after entering in the bottom of the fourth. He began the day by retiring Bichette with a flyout to right.

ROYALS
Seuly Matias, OF, KC No. 3
Matias got the World Team on the board with a 100.7-mph solo homer off Yankees lefty Sheffield, then followed up with a single in the fifth to round out a 2-for-3 day.

Video: WLD@USA: Matias puts the World on the board with a HR

TIGERS
Matt Manning, RHP, DET No. 2 | MLB No. 47
Manning gave up two earned runs on four hits, including a homer to Diaz, while working the fourth and fifth innings. His fastball averaged 94.1 mph, and he complemented it with good variance on his curveball, which hovered in the high-70s.

Video: WLD@USA: Manning strikes out Urias in the 5th inning

Dawel Lugo, 2B, DET No. 12
Acquired last summer as part of the J.D. Martinez deal, Detroit's talented infielder scored a run and went 1-for-2 with a single off Sheffield.

TWINS 
Alex Kirilloff, OF, MIN No. 3 | MLB No. 67
Minnesota's top outfield prospect lined two singles -- one to left field and the other to right-center -- as part of a 2-for-3 day with a run scored. His second single came off Lewis Thorpe, his fellow up-and-comer in the Twins system.

Lewis Thorpe, LHP, MIN No. 11
Thorpe struggled to keep the ball in the park during his fourth-inning stint, surrendering homers to Jansen and Hayes as part of three hits and a walk surrendered in just two-thirds of an inning.

Video: WLD@USA: Thorpe K's Hiura swinging in the 4th inning

WHITE SOX
Dylan Cease, RHP, CWS No. 4 | MLB No. 40
Entering in the top of the ninth, Cease induced a groundout from Leodys Taveras then got Tatis to fly out to right before paving way for Ortiz's victory-sealing groundout.

Video: WLD@USA: Basabe homers off 102-mph pitch from Greene

Luis Alexander Basabe, OF, CWS No. 13
One of the most impressive plays of the entire game came in the top of the third, when Basabe timed Greene's 102.3-mph fastball and muscled it out for a 404-foot home run.

Tweet from @darenw: Luis Alexander Basabe just turned on a 102.3 MPH fastball for a home run... Would be fastest pitch in @mlb hit for a HR since Rafael Devers took Chapman deep last season on a 102.8 MPH pitch.

Basabe also nabbed a runner at second base with an accurate first-inning throw from center field.

YANKEES
Justus Sheffield, LHP, NYY No. 2 | MLB No. 39
Sheffield gave up a second-inning homer to Matias that tied the game at 1. Sheffield was also credited for another earned run for allowing his final batter, Lugo, reach on a single. Lugo then scored on Basabe's homer off Greene.

Daniel Kramer is a reporter for MLB.com based in Denver. Follow him on Twitter at @DKramer_. MLB.com's Matt Kelly contributed to this story.