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Soroka HBP on right arm; X-rays negative

Snitker: 'They don’t think it’s going to be anything other than a bruise'
@mlbbowman
June 23, 2019

WASHINGTON -- Braves right-hander Mike Soroka hearkened back to his childhood days in Canada when he was asked what he felt when his right forearm was struck by Austin Voth’s fastball during the third inning of Sunday afternoon’s 4-3, 10-inning win over the Nationals. “It just feels like a bruise,”

WASHINGTON -- Braves right-hander Mike Soroka hearkened back to his childhood days in Canada when he was asked what he felt when his right forearm was struck by Austin Voth’s fastball during the third inning of Sunday afternoon’s 4-3, 10-inning win over the Nationals.

“It just feels like a bruise,” Soroka said. “It feels like getting hit by a pitch. I’ve been hit by enough [hockey] pucks and baseballs in my lifetime to know what the aftermath will be. It’s just a bruise.”

The Braves breathed a sigh of relief when X-rays performed at Nationals Park showed Soroka’ forearm was simply bruised by Voth’s 93.3-mph fastball. It appears the 21-year-old right-hander might be ready to take his next turn, which would be Friday against the Mets at Citi Field.

“We’ll know more in a couple days when he tries to throw the ball around,” Braves manager Brian Snitker said. “They don’t think it’s going to be anything other than a nice bruise.”

After getting hit by the pitch, Soroka took first base without receiving any medical attention. But once he was evaluated in the dugout before the bottom of the third, Snitker quickly decided to immediately remove his talented rookie hurler, who ranks second in the Majors with a 2.07 ERA.

“I think he’s OK,” Snitker said. “All the X-rays were negative. I didn’t want him going out there feeling something in his forearm and trying to pad it. It was an easy decision.”

Soroka slammed his bat after getting hit because he knew the ensuing swelling would prevent him from continuing to pitch. His reaction was in no way pointed toward Voth, who certainly didn’t want to plunk the opposing pitcher with one out and no one on base in the third inning of a scoreless game.

“I know [Voth],” Soroka said. “I got to work out with him this offseason. Obviously with a 1-1 fastball, they weren’t going up and in. It happens. It’s part of baseball. I’ve always been an advocate for pitchers hitting. So, when stuff like that happens, you just have to make up innings the next time out.”

Mark Bowman has covered the Braves for MLB.com since 2001.