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White Sox NRIs include 7 Top 30 prospects

MLB.com @scottmerkin

CHICAGO -- Seven of the White Sox Top 30 prospects per MLB Pipeline received a non-roster invite to Major League Spring Training as announced by the team on Tuesday.

Those top-rated young White Sox players are outfielder Luis Robert (No. 4), infielder Nick Madrigal (No. 5), outfielder Blake Rutherford (No. 7), catcher Zack Collins (No. 8), outfielder Luis Gonzalez (No. 14), right-handed pitcher Jimmy Lambert (No. 21) and left-handed pitcher Bernardo Flores (No. 25). Righty Zach Thompson, lefties Jordan Guerrero and Colton Turner, catchers Alfredo Gonzalez and Nate Nolan, infielder Danny Mendick and outfielder Charlie Tilson complete the list of 14 players from within the system to get non-roster invites.

CHICAGO -- Seven of the White Sox Top 30 prospects per MLB Pipeline received a non-roster invite to Major League Spring Training as announced by the team on Tuesday.

Those top-rated young White Sox players are outfielder Luis Robert (No. 4), infielder Nick Madrigal (No. 5), outfielder Blake Rutherford (No. 7), catcher Zack Collins (No. 8), outfielder Luis Gonzalez (No. 14), right-handed pitcher Jimmy Lambert (No. 21) and left-handed pitcher Bernardo Flores (No. 25). Righty Zach Thompson, lefties Jordan Guerrero and Colton Turner, catchers Alfredo Gonzalez and Nate Nolan, infielder Danny Mendick and outfielder Charlie Tilson complete the list of 14 players from within the system to get non-roster invites.

Right-handers Randall Delgado, Evan Marshall and Donn Roach as well as infielders Ryan GoinsD.J. Peterson and Matt Skole agreed to Minor League contracts, bringing the non-roster invite total to 20 at Camelback Ranch in Glendale, Ariz.

Of the White Sox Top 30 prospects per MLB Pipeline, 17 will be in big league camp. Among those not on that list are righties Dane Dunning (No. 6) and Alec Hansen (No. 10), outfielder Steele Walker (No. 12), infielder Jake Burger (No. 13), first baseman Gavin Sheets (No. 15) and righty Zack Burdi (No. 17). Burdi is working his way back from Tommy John surgery from July 27, 2017, having pitched in seven games for the Rookie-level Arizona League team in '18, while Burger is rehabbing from two tears in his left Achilles tendon.

Dunning suffered a moderate right elbow sprain and didn't pitch after June 23 for Double-A Birmingham. But he reported strong progress while throwing during instructional league action in October.

White Sox pitchers and catchers report to Spring Training on Wednesday, Feb. 13, for baseball activities including physicals and a workout. Position players will report and undergo physicals on Monday, Feb. 18. The first full-squad workout also takes place that day. The White Sox open their 2019 Cactus League season on Saturday, Feb. 23 with split-squad games vs. the Dodgers at Camelback Ranch (home team) and at Oakland in Mesa.

Scott Merkin has covered the White Sox for MLB.com since 2003. Follow him on Twitter @scottmerkin and Facebook and listen to his podcast.

Chicago White Sox

Fulmer driven to prove potential for White Sox

Pitcher refocused after 2018 setback; 'I think it's straight uphill'
MLB.com @scottmerkin

CHICAGO -- The words "picked No. 8 overall in the 2015 Draft" frequently seem to follow the name of White Sox hurler Carson Fulmer.

For positive reasons, because the right-hander was dominant and talented enough at Vanderbilt to earn such a lofty selection and a $3.47 million signing bonus. Unfortunately, also for negative reasons, as Fulmer has not lived up to the first-round hoopla with a 6.68 ERA over 24 appearances (13 starts) in the Majors.

CHICAGO -- The words "picked No. 8 overall in the 2015 Draft" frequently seem to follow the name of White Sox hurler Carson Fulmer.

For positive reasons, because the right-hander was dominant and talented enough at Vanderbilt to earn such a lofty selection and a $3.47 million signing bonus. Unfortunately, also for negative reasons, as Fulmer has not lived up to the first-round hoopla with a 6.68 ERA over 24 appearances (13 starts) in the Majors.

Don't feel sorry for the good-natured but driven Fulmer, as he seemingly hasn't lost an ounce of confidence. He may be down through the first three seasons of his Major League career, but Fulmer doesn't feel close to being out.

"People will have their own opinions. I have my own opinion and I have to stick to it," Fulmer told MLB.com from his offseason home in Seattle. "We have a great fan base, very supportive fan base that wants to win, and I get it. We have to go out there and put up quality starts and get guys out from a bullpen perspective. It drives me as well.

"I pitched really well in college to be able to get the opportunity, but I don't want to just be a first-round pick. I want to be a 10-plus-year veteran pitcher in the big leagues. I won't stop until that happens.

"Everybody has a little bump in their career. That was the bump for me. I think it's straight uphill from now."

Fulmer, 25, looked as if he had navigated that bump in 2017 by posting a 1.64 ERA over six September appearances (four starts). That great finish was followed by a miserable spring in Arizona, where Fulmer allowed 31 baserunners in 10 2/3 innings, and those struggles continued as part of the '18 rotation, with Fulmer allowing 29 earned runs over 32 1/3 innings in spite of seven shutout frames thrown in Kanas City on April 28.

His 2018 big league run came to an end on May 18 after allowing eight runs on three hits and five walks in two innings vs. the Rangers at home. In the postgame scrum, already knowing he was returning to Triple-A Charlotte, Fulmer looked more defiant and annoyed than forlorn and defeated.

Video: Carson Fulmer on being sent down

"More than anything it was the fact that I was given such a great opportunity and I was inconsistent throughout that opportunity," Fulmer said. "The White Sox have given me every chance I possibly could have. I still have the chance to do what I need to do, and it just took a little bit of time to figure out what exactly works for me."

"He has to go back to simply getting people out," White Sox pitching coach Don Cooper said. "It hasn't happened. But Carson is feeling good. He's in great shape."

Although Fulmer would have liked to join the White Sox in September after showing improvement working in relief for Charlotte, he got in the weight room the day after his season ended. He's lost a good amount of weight and worked all offseason at Driveline Baseball in Seattle, seeing tremendous jumps in all his stuff when it comes to spin rate and velocity.

"I've been through live hitters three times already, and my stuff has jumped tremendously in each of those outings," Fulmer said. "My endurance shape is the best it's been.

"I'm definitely ready for Spring Training and the opportunity to face some of those hitters as well. I've worked the hardest this offseason I ever have."

Pure stuff never has been an issue for Fulmer -- he believes it plays at the highest level. With a set routine in place somewhat akin to what he followed at Vanderbilt, Fulmer hopes results match that stuff either as a big league starter or in relief.

"That lack of consistency really was not even mental or physical," Fulmer said. "It was the fact that I wanted to try new things. Even shutting out the Kansas City Royals, I felt like I needed to do something else.

"This is my time to go. I still have a great opportunity to make the team out of spring, and I am definitely going to be ready to compete and get the job done."

Scott Merkin has covered the White Sox for MLB.com since 2003. Follow him on Twitter @scottmerkin and Facebook and listen to his podcast.

Chicago White Sox, Carson Fulmer

Each team's rotation if season started today

MLB.com

We're less than a month away from Spring Training, so it's a good time to project what each club's Opening Day rotation will look like, or at least what it would look like if the season started today. With the help of all 30 MLB.com beat writers, here's a roundup of how they might shake out.

AMERICAN LEAGUE EAST

We're less than a month away from Spring Training, so it's a good time to project what each club's Opening Day rotation will look like, or at least what it would look like if the season started today. With the help of all 30 MLB.com beat writers, here's a roundup of how they might shake out.

AMERICAN LEAGUE EAST

Blue Jays
Marcus Stroman and Aaron Sanchez are back for the start of another year, but the big question is, for how long? Both starters have been mentioned as possible trade candidates, and with just two years of control remaining, the rumors aren't going away any time soon. There has been a lot of turnover in the Toronto rotation lately and there will be even more soon. J.A. Happ and Marco Estrada are gone, while Matt Shoemaker, Clayton Richard and rookie Ryan Borucki are in. -- Gregor Chisholm

Rotation if season started today
1. Marcus Stroman, RHP
2. Aaron Sanchez, RHP
3. Ryan Borucki, LHP
4. Matt Shoemaker, RHP
5. Clayton Richard, LHP

Orioles
With statistically the worst rotation in 2018, the Orioles could return a unit entirely unchanged from a year ago. It is also a group that could look completely different by season's end. Dylan Bundy regressed mightily in his age-25 season, while Andrew Cashner and Alex Cobb struggled to career-worst lines in their debut years in Baltimore. All are candidates to be dealt by summer's end, should they bounce back in some fashion.

But to start, as many as seven pitchers could be fighting for the final two spots. David Hess and Yefry Ramirez received the most work in 2018, but neither performed well enough to enter camp with starting jobs. Expect the likes of Jimmy Yacabonis, Dillon Tate, Luis Ortiz, Hunter Harvey and Keegan Akin to get long looks this spring. -- Joe Trezza

Rotation if season started today
1. Dylan Bundy, RHP
2. Andrew Cashner, RHP
3. Alex Cobb, RHP
4. David Hess, RHP
5. Yefry Ramirez, RHP

Rays
The Rays will continue to use the "opener" in 2019, but it remains to be seen just how they plan on doing so heading into the season. Blake Snell, the reigning American League Cy Young Award winner, will serve as the team's ace. Charlie Morton, the team's big free-agent acquisition, will give the rotation a big boost and a much-needed veteran presence. Tyler Glasnow, who showed flashes of why he was once the No. 1 prospect in baseball, will slot in as the team's third starter. Now, once you get past that trio, there are a lot more questions for the Rays. Manager Kevin Cash said during the Winter Meetings that the team plans on using the opener twice in the rotation. However, it'll make sense for the Rays to split up the days where they plan on using an opener in order to keep the bullpen fresh. It'll be interesting to see what order the Rays ultimately go with, but one thing is certain: The opener is coming back. -- Juan Toribio

Rotation if season started today
1. Blake Snell, LHP
2. Charlie Morton, RHP
3. Opener
4. Tyler Glasnow, RHP
5. Opener

Video: Cash discusses increasing use of openers in baseball

Red Sox
The defending World Series-champion Red Sox are loaded in the rotation. Ace Chris Sale is healthy again after going though a prolonged bout of left shoulder inflammation last summer. Then again, Sale looked plenty healthy when he threw a wipeout slider to whiff Manny Machado and end the World Series. For the first time since he got to Boston, David Price enters the season with no questions about his ability to come through in high-pressure moments. Nobody was bigger for the Sox in October than the veteran lefty. Well, perhaps nobody but Nathan Eovaldi, the flame-throwing righty the Red Sox prioritized this offseason by re-signing him to a four-year, $68 million contract. Rick Porcello might never win a Cy Young Award again, but he is consistently durable and dependable and is entering the final season of his contract. Once again, Eduardo Rodriguez comes into Spring Training in hopes of that breakout year. He was plenty good when healthy in 2018. The presence of depth options Brian Johnson, Hector Velazquez and Steven Wright will give manager Alex Cora the ability to rest his starters when healthy. -- Ian Browne

Rotation if season started today
1. Chris Sale, LHP
2. David Price, LHP
3. Rick Porcello, RHP
4. Nathan Eovaldi, RHP
5. Eduardo Rodriguez, LHP

Video: Sale says he feels 'normal again,' ready for spring

Yankees
The Yankees entered the winter aiming to add at least one top-of-the-rotation hurler, which they believe was accomplished by acquiring James Paxton from the Mariners in November. "Big Maple" projects to pair with Luis Severino to create a formidable one-two punch, though Paxton will need to remain healthy and Severino must cure the pitch-tipping ills that spoiled his second half. Masahiro Tanaka has been a reliable contributor through five big league seasons, and Happ seemed to instantly fit in after being acquired from the Blue Jays in July. After a scary health episode in December, CC Sabathia is looking to end his career on a high note. -- Bryan Hoch

Rotation if season started today
1. Luis Severino, RHP
2. James Paxton, LHP
3. Masahiro Tanaka, RHP
4. J.A. Happ, LHP
5. CC Sabathia, LHP

Video: Hoch analyzes the Yankees' starting rotation

AMERICAN LEAGUE CENTRAL

Indians
There have been plenty of rumors surrounding the Indians' starting rotation this offseason, but for now, both Corey Kluber and Trevor Bauer remain in Cleveland. Last season, the Tribe led all other starting staffs in Wins Above Replacement (22.9) for the second consecutive year, per FanGraphs, and is returning all five of its top 2018 hurlers. The club will also have options in Danny Salazar -- who missed last season due to right shoulder surgery -- once he is ready to rejoin the club, and Cody Anderson, who was sidelined the last two years from Tommy John surgery. If the rotation stays intact, it has the chance to be one of the most dominant in baseball once again with Kluber and Bauer being potential Cy Young Award contenders and Shane Bieber having a year of Major League experience under his belt. -- Mandy Bell

Rotation if season started today
1. Corey Kluber, RHP
2. Trevor Bauer, RHP
3. Carlos Carrasco, RHP
4. Mike Clevinger, RHP
5. Shane Bieber, RHP

Royals
The Royals' front four of the rotation seem fairly set heading into Spring Training, though the order is anything but set. If Danny Duffy's offseason work is as promising as he suggests, he likely will claim the top spot and be the Opening Day starter. The emergence of Rule 5 Draft pick Brad Keller last year makes one believe he'll elevate to the No. 2 spot. Jakob Junis' strong finish suggests he'll claim the No. 3 spot. Ian Kennedy also finished well, but it wouldn't be a huge surprise if at some point the Royals utilized him as a late-inning guy. The fifth spot will be the fun battle in Spring Training, although the PED suspension of left-hander Eric Skoglund narrows the rotation. That No. 5 spot probably comes down to Jorge Lopez (who nearly threw a perfect game last season), Heath Fillmyer and a host of other candidates, including Glenn SparkmanArnaldo Hernandez and Trevor Oaks. -- Jeffrey Flanagan

Rotation if season started today
1. Danny Duffy, LHP
2. Brad Keller, RHP
3. Jakob Junis, RHP
4. Ian Kennedy, RHP
5. Jorge Lopez, RHP

Tigers
Take three established starters who form the core of the Tigers' rotation and add two free-agent signings looking for career rebounds. Top it off with a young pitcher or two who could work their way into full-time starting roles but could also serve as depth for injuries or versatile swingmen in the bullpen. It's a formula the Tigers used to build their rotation a year ago. It's a formula they'll use again for 2019.

Replace Mike Fiers and Francisco Liriano with Matt Moore and Tyson Ross, and the Tigers' projected rotation looks similar to last year. Matthew Boyd has blossomed into a potential front-line workhorse with a breakthrough 2018 season. Michael Fulmer is again trying to bounce back from surgery, this time to repair a torn meniscus in his right knee. Jordan Zimmermann is recovering from core muscle repair surgery, but his arm appears to be fine. Daniel Norris again has a chance to prove himself but seems poised to reprise a spot starter/relief role following the Moore and Ross signings. Spencer Turnbull could be in line for a similar fit after an encouraging September stretch in the rotation, or he could serve as insurance at Triple-A Toledo.

With five highly ranked starting pitching prospects on the way, the Tigers could have a vastly different rotation in a couple of years. For now, however, there's some stability in the top half. -- Jason Beck

Rotation if season started today
1. Matthew Boyd, LHP
2. Michael Fulmer, RHP
3. Jordan Zimmermann, RHP
4. Matt Moore, LHP
5. Tyson Ross, RHP

Video: Boyd reflects on 2018, looks forward to 2019

Twins
Four of the Twins' starting spots for 2019 were all but set entering the offseason. At the top is 24-year-old Jose Berrios, who is coming off his first 200-strikeout season and supported by the experienced Jake Odorizzi and Kyle Gibson, who had his long-awaited breakout last season. Michael Pineda is also expected to hold down a rotation spot in his return from Tommy John surgery, as the Twins hope that he can regain the pre-injury form that netted him the American League's most strikeouts per nine innings in '16.

While there are several options on the roster for Minnesota's unclaimed fifth rotation spot, the Twins are reportedly adding left-hander Martin Perez, a veteran of seven Major League seasons, who could emerge as the candidate to hold down the position until the organization's young pitching prospects are more ready to establish themselves at the MLB level. Fernando Romero and Adalberto Mejia could also be in the conversation, and Kohl Stewart, Stephen Gonsalves and Chase De Jong should also push for consideration. -- Do-Hyoung Park

Rotation if season started today
1. Jose Berrios, RHP
2. Kyle Gibson, RHP
3. Michael Pineda, RHP
4. Jake Odorizzi, RHP
5. Martin Perez, LHP

Video: Twins reportedly sign Martin Perez to 1-year deal

White Sox
If Michael Kopech didn't suffer a tear in his ulnar collateral ligament at the end of the 2018 season and lose his '19 season to recovery from Tommy John surgery, the White Sox rotation would look quite a bit different. If Dylan Cease, the reigning MLB Pipeline Pitcher of the Year, continues the great progression he showed in '18, he could be the final piece of the rotation sooner than later.

The White Sox have Manny Banuelos, Carson Fulmer, Dylan Covey and Jordan Stephens battling for that fifth spot. But if the White Sox add another veteran hurler, that move would change the look of the starting staff.

There are rotation certainties heading into the season. Carlos Rodon could make his first Opening Day start as he enters the 2019 campaign fully healthy. Ivan Nova is a solid innings eater added to the middle of the rotation, and Reynaldo Lopez and Lucas Giolito will take what they learned in their first full seasons and try to make a step up in '19. -- Scott Merkin

Rotation if season started today
1. Carlos Rodon, LHP
2. Reynaldo Lopez, RHP
3. Ivan Nova, RHP
4. Lucas Giolito, RHP
5. Manny Banuelos, LHP

AMERICAN LEAGUE WEST

Angels
The Angels are counting on talented lefties Andrew Heaney and Tyler Skaggs to lead the rotation, but they've had injury concerns in recent years, so keeping them healthy will be key. They added Matt Harvey and Trevor Cahill via free agency on one-year deals to add depth, as Shohei Ohtani isn't pitching in 2019 after Tommy John surgery. They're hoping for a bounce-back season from Harvey, who pitched better after being traded to the Reds. Cahill is coming off one of his better seasons, turning in a 3.76 ERA with the A's. Right-hander Jaime Barria had a solid rookie season in 2018, posting a 3.41 ERA in 26 starts, and is the front-runner for the fifth spot. Others in the mix include Nick Tropeano, Felix Pena and Dillon Peters until highly regarded prospects Griffin Canning and Jose Suarez are ready for the Majors. -- Rhett Bollinger

Rotation if season started today
1. Tyler Skaggs, LHP
2. Andrew Heaney, LHP
3. Matt Harvey, RHP
4. Trevor Cahill, RHP
5. Jaime Barria, RHP

Astros
Justin Verlander and Gerrit Cole both finished in the top five in American League Cy Young Award voting last year, so that's a great place to start. Collin McHugh is back in the rotation following a terrific season out of the bullpen. The Astros are in pursuit of a veteran starting pitcher to add to the mix, but for now they have promising youngsters Josh James and Framber Valdez in the rotation. Top pitching prospect Forrest Whitley should make his debut at some point in 2019, but another veteran arm is desired. -- Brian McTaggart

Rotation if season started today
1. Justin Verlander, RHP
2. Gerrit Cole, RHP
3. Collin McHugh, RHP
4. Josh James, RHP
5. Framber Valdez, LHP

Video: McHugh analyzes his important role with the Astros

Athletics
This is merely guesswork at this juncture of the offseason. The A's desperately need more starters to bolster this unit, which features little experience outside of the seasoned Fiers, and they're expected to find those add-on pieces in the coming weeks. Jesus Luzardo, of course, is the most intriguing name among this bunch; the A's anticipate their top pitching prospect to break camp with the big-league club. Elsewhere, Daniel Mengden, Chris Bassitt and Paul Blackburn represent the top in-house rotation options at this point, with Frankie Montas and Aaron Brooks acting as depth behind them. -- Jane Lee

Rotation if season started today
1. Mike Fiers, RHP
2. Jesus Luzardo, LHP
3. Daniel Mengden, RHP
4. Chris Bassitt, RHP
5. Paul Blackburn, RHP

Mariners
With Felix Hernandez coming off the worst season of his 14-year career (8-14, 5.55 ERA) and Paxton traded to the Yankees this offseason, the Mariners' rotation is a bit of a mystery at the top end. Should the club decide to end Hernandez's streak of 10 consecutive Opening Day starts, the likely options are up-and-coming lefty Marco Gonzales or newly signed Japanese free agent Yusei Kikuchi.

But with one remaining year at $27 million on his contract, Hernandez still figures to get a shot at fitting somewhere in the mix and the club also returns veterans Mike Leake and Wade LeBlanc, both coming off solid seasons. Clearly the future is knocking on the door, however, as newly acquired prospects Justus Sheffield, Justin Dunn and Erik Swanson are all potential additions at some point this year. -- Greg Johns

Rotation if season started today
1. Marco Gonzales, LHP
2. Yusei Kikuchi, LHP
3. Mike Leake, RHP
4. Wade LeBlanc, LHP
5. Felix Hernandez, RHP

Video: Mariners could be creative with Kikuchi's workload

Rangers
The Rangers could have a set rotation in place right now if they are content to go into the season with three starters who underwent Tommy John surgery within the last two years.

That's the mystery surrounding the Rangers with less than a month to go before pitchers and catchers report to Spring Training. The Rangers have five veteran starters in place, but they all have undergone significant physical issues recently in their careers. It would seem unlikely that the Rangers would go to camp without at least adding more depth. -- T.R. Sullivan

Rotation if season started today
1. Mike Minor, LHP 
2. Lance Lynn, RHP
3. Drew Smyly, LHP
4. Edinson Volquez, RHP
5. Shelby Miller, RHP

NATIONAL LEAGUE EAST

Braves
With Sonny Gray going to the Reds, it looks like the Braves may enter Spring Training without making a rotation addition. Mike Foltynewicz performed like a front-line starter last year, and Sean Newcomb has the capability to make a similar leap this year. Kevin Gausman and Julio Teheran provided quality depth to this group, which could be enriched by a healthy Mike Soroka and a further-developed Touki Toussaint. Soroka, Toussaint and Kyle Wright are among the Braves prospects who could share the fifth spot on an alternating basis during the early part of the season. -- Mark Bowman

Rotation if season started today
1. Mike Foltynewicz, RHP
2. Sean Newcomb, LHP
3. Kevin Gausman, RHP
4. Julio Teheran, RHP
5. TBD

Video: Newcomb, Soroka, Minter and Venters at Chop Fest

Marlins
How the rotation goes will largely determine how long the Marlins' rebuilding process takes. Based on talent and depth, there are many interesting options for Miami, either starters who will be on the Opening Day roster or join the rotation over the course of the season. Jose Urena has cemented himself as the ace. Dan Straily is an experienced right-hander and Wei-Yin Chen is projected to be the lone left-hander. If Straily isn't dealt before Spring Training, he profiles as the No. 2 starter. Trevor Richards, Sandy Alcantara, Caleb Smith and Pablo Lopez made starts as rookies in 2018. But Smith missed the second half due to surgery to repair a left pectoral muscle, and Lopez missed all of September with a shoulder issue. -- Joe Frisaro

Rotation if season started today
1. Jose Urena, RHP
2. Dan Straily, RHP
3. Wei-Yin Chen, LHP
4. Sandy Alcantara, RHP
5. Trevor Richards, RHP

Mets
The Mets' rotation won't feature any surprises. Jacob deGrom, the reigning National League Cy Young Award winner, will start on Opening Day. Noah Syndergaard, Zack Wheeler and Steven Matz will file in behind him, looking for healthy seasons. The Mets will round out their starting five with Jason Vargas, who rebounded from a poor first half to give the Mets confidence in him heading into 2019. -- Anthony DiComo

Rotation if season started today
1. Jacob deGrom, RHP
2. Noah Syndergaard, RHP
3. Zack Wheeler, RHP
4. Steven Matz, LHP
5. Jason Vargas, LHP

Video: deGrom wins the 2018 NL Cy Young Award

Nationals
"Starting pitching is king," general manager Mike Rizzo proclaimed at the start of December, before he began revamping a rotation that disappointed the Nationals last season. First, the Nats added the top free-agent starting-pitching prize in Patrick Corbin and followed it up by signing the resurgent Anibal Sanchez, fresh off a breakout 2018 that resurrected his career. Those additions combined with perennial Cy Young candidate Max Scherzer and the dominant when healthy Stephen Strasburg should give Washington one of the best rotations in the National League. -- Jamal Collier

Rotation if season started today
1. Max Scherzer, RHP
2. Stephen Strasburg, RHP
3. Patrick Corbin, LHP
4. Anibal Sanchez, RHP
5. Joe Ross, RHP

Phillies
The Phillies could open the 2019 season with the same rotation that finished 2018, which has the front office feeling OK and fans a little nervous. Aaron Nola, Jake Arrieta, Nick Pivetta, Zach Eflin and Vince Velasquez pitched well through early August before struggling mightily the final two months of the season. The front office believes the group will be better, based on experience and a 3.76 FIP, which ranked seventh in baseball last season. But the front office also acknowledges what fans wonder: Is it a risk? There is a reason the Phillies pursued Corbin and Happ this winter. It is why there remains an outside chance they take a run at free-agent left-hander Dallas Keuchel-- Todd Zolecki

Rotation if season started today
1. Aaron Nola, RHP
2. Jake Arrieta, RHP
3. Nick Pivetta, RHP
4. Zach Eflin, RHP
5. Vince Velasquez, RHP

Video: Aaron Nola on veteran help, Phils' comeback season

NATIONAL LEAGUE CENTRAL

Brewers
Predicting a five-man rotation for the Brewers under David Stearns and Craig Counsell is a challenge. Last season, they employed 11 starting pitchers, including seven who made double-digit starts. In 2017, 13 pitchers started games for the Brewers. That's in part by design. For example, last winter's consensus was that the Brewers needed a front-line starter and should spend big for a free agent the likes of Yu Darvish. Instead, Stearns signed Jhoulys Chacin to a two-year deal and built a rotation short on "aces" but long on depth, and those arms took the Brewers to within one victory of the World Series.

There is still time for acquisitions, but it appears the Brewers plan to employ the same strategy in 2019. Chacin leads the way, followed by a group of established pitchers aiming for bounce-back seasons and some up-and-comers seeking to build on 2018 success. We'll stretch the list to seven pitchers positioned to make more than a start or two. -- Adam McCalvy

Rotation if season started today
1. Jhoulys Chacin, RHP
2. Chase Anderson, RHP
3. Zach Davies, RHP
4. Jimmy Nelson, RHP
5. Brandon Woodruff, RHP
6. Corbin Burnes, RHP
7. Freddy Peralta, RHP

Cardinals
Options are plentiful as the Cardinals begin to piece together their starting rotation. Miles Mikolas will return as the likely Opening Day starter and anchor what could be an entirely right-handed unit. The first four spots seem solidified, barring injury, and Adam Wainwright will have the inside track for the fifth. If the Cards need to go further down the depth chart, they have several other starting candidates in John Gant, Austin Gomber, Dakota Hudson, Alex Reyes and Daniel Ponce de Leon-- Jenifer Langosch

Rotation if season started today
1. Miles Mikolas, RHP
2. Carlos Martinez, RHP
3. Jack Flaherty, RHP
4. Michael Wacha, RHP
5. Adam Wainwright, RHP

Video: Cardinals' 2019 rotation starting to take shape

Cubs
The Cubs' projected starting five average 32 years old with nearly nine years of MLB experience. They are experienced and capable of logging the kind of innings that could alleviate some of the uncertainty in the bullpen. Darvish, who was limited to eight starts last year due to injury, will be the wild card. But all indications are that he is healthy and Darvish said last week that he will be unrestricted this spring with Opening Day as a realistic goal. With all five starters issue-free, Mike Montgomery and Tyler Chatwood would become relief options. -- Jordan Bastian

Rotation if season started today
1. Jon Lester, LHP
2. Kyle Hendricks, RHP
3. Cole Hamels, LHP
4. Yu Darvish, RHP
5. Jose Quintana, LHP

Video: NL WC: Lester fans 9 in 1-run outing vs. the Rockies

Pirates
The Pirates might have one of the game's most underrated rotations after adding Chris Archer in the middle of a breakout season for both Jameson Taillon and Trevor Williams. A full year of Archer should help, and they would benefit from a healthy Joe Musgrove as well. Taillon and Williams must prove their improvements were sustainable. Free agent acquisition Jordan Lyles, who tweaked his pitch usage last season, looks like the early favorite for the fifth spot over lefty Steven Brault and out-of-options righty Nick Kingham. -- Adam Berry

Rotation if season started today
1. Jameson Taillon, RHP
2. Chris Archer, RHP
3. Trevor Williams, RHP
4. Joe Musgrove, RHP
5. Jordan Lyles, RHP

Reds
The Reds wanted to put their rebuilding efforts fully behind them, but they knew they couldn't get far without improving their rotation. Cincinnati, which ranked 14th out of 15 clubs in starter ERA last season, didn't just make tweaks; it was instead a big overhaul with three winter trades bringing in Gray, Tanner Roark and Alex Wood. Whether the Reds can fully contend in '19 after four straight 90-plus-loss seasons remains to be seen, but they should definitely pitch better. -- Mark Sheldon

Rotation if season started today
1. Sonny Gray, RHP
2. Tanner Roark, RHP
3. Alex Wood, LHP
4. Luis Castillo, RHP
5. Anthony DeSclafani, RHP

Video: Gray traded to Reds in three-team deal

NATIONAL LEAGUE WEST

D-backs
The rotation, which was a team strength in 2018, will be without Corbin and Clay Buchholz in 2019, but the D-backs still have Zack Greinke and Robbie Ray and expect to get Taijuan Walker back from Tommy John surgery. To build some depth behind Greinke, Ray and Zack Godley, the D-backs acquired right-hander Luke Weaver from the Cardinals in the Paul Goldschmidt trade, and they signed righty Merrill Kelly, who spent the past four seasons pitching in Korea.

Arizona does have some depth at the top end of the farm system in Matt Koch, Taylor Widener and Jon Duplantier among others. -- Steve Gilbert

Rotation if season started today
1. Zack Greinke, RHP
2. Robbie Ray, LHP
3. Zack Godley, RHP
4. Luke Weaver, RHP
5. Merrill Kelly, RHP

Dodgers
To those worked up over whether the top two on this list should be reversed, what a fantastic dilemma that is. Not making the top-five cut for now are Julio Urias and Ross Stripling, another high-quality surplus. Even without Kluber, who has been tied to the Dodgers in trade rumors all winter, Los Angeles' starting rotation is the envy of most clubs. -- Ken Gurnick

Rotation if season started today
1. Clayton Kershaw, LHP
2. Walker Buehler, RHP
3. Hyun-Jin Ryu, LHP
4. Rich Hill, LHP
5. Kenta Maeda, RHP

Video: Watch some of the Dodgers' nastiest pitches from 2018

Giants
Madison Bumgarner has been the subject of numerous trade rumors this offseason, but president of baseball operations Farhan Zaidi has said he isn't making any outgoing calls regarding the club's longtime ace, so he remains in line to be the Giants' Opening Day starter. The Giants will miss Johnny Cueto, who will be unavailable for most of the season while rehabbing from Tommy John surgery, but they added some durability to their rotation by re-signing Derek Holland last week. Jeff Samardzija is a bit of a question mark after struggling with a persistent right shoulder issue in 2018, though he is progressing well in his throwing program. Despite their impressive rookie campaigns, Dereck Rodriguez and Andrew Suarez aren't necessarily locks for the Opening Day rotation, as the Giants would prefer to ease pressure on their young arms by having them begin the year in the bullpen or in the Minors. -- Chris Haft

Rotation if season started today
1. Madison Bumgarner, LHP
2. Derek Holland, LHP
3. Dereck Rodriguez, RHP
4. Andrew Suarez, LHP
5. Jeff Samardzija, RHP

Video: A look back at Madison Bumgarner's 2018 season

Padres
It seems likely the Padres add another arm to this mix before the start of Spring Training. Their rotation posted the highest ERA in the NL last year, and Garrett Richards has been the only addition. He might not even pitch this season. Still, it's clear San Diego wants to give its young arms a chance. Logan Allen and Jacob Nix will compete for places this spring, while Joey Lucchesi and Eric Lauer could headline the rotation. Meanwhile, keep an eye on left-hander Matt Strahm, who was outstanding in the 'pen last season in his return from knee surgery. The Padres have asked him to bulk up for a transition into a starting role. If his body holds up, he's got front-of-the-rotation stuff. -- AJ Cassavell

Rotation if season started today
1. Joey Lucchesi, LHP
2. Eric Lauer, LHP
3. Robbie Erlin, LHP
4. Bryan Mitchell, RHP
5. Matt Strahm, LHP

Rockies
Rare in the Rockies' history have they had such quality and depth. Lefty Kyle Freeland finished fourth in NL Cy Young Award balloting, righty German Marquez finished eighth in the NL in strikeouts, and hopes are high for lefty Tyler Anderson after he set career highs for innings pitched and strikeouts last season. Jon Gray is trying to rebound from a season that saw him optioned to the Minors and left off the postseason roster, and Chad Bettis hopes blister problems that marred his 2018 season are in the past. But the listed rotation is not chiseled in granite. Pushing hard for jobs are righties Antonio Senzatela, who started last year's NL Division Series opener; righty Jeff Hoffman, who suffered a shoulder injury last spring and never had a chance to challenge for a job; and righty prospect Peter Lambert, who climbed to Triple-A last season at age 21. -- Thomas Harding

Rotation if season started today
1. Kyle Freeland, LHP
2. German Marquez, RHP
3. Tyler Anderson, LHP
4. Jon Gray, RHP
5. Chad Bettis, RHP

Madrigal among MLB's Top 10 2B prospects

MLB.com @GoldenSombrero

MLB Pipeline will unveil its 2019 Top 100 Prospects list on Saturday, with a one-hour show on MLB Network at 8 p.m. ET. Leading up to the release, we look at baseball's top 10 prospects at each position.

MLB Pipeline ended last week with a look at our Top 10 first-base prospects for 2019, a group teeming with future sluggers, some on the cusp of the Major Leagues.

MLB Pipeline will unveil its 2019 Top 100 Prospects list on Saturday, with a one-hour show on MLB Network at 8 p.m. ET. Leading up to the release, we look at baseball's top 10 prospects at each position.

MLB Pipeline ended last week with a look at our Top 10 first-base prospects for 2019, a group teeming with future sluggers, some on the cusp of the Major Leagues.

Our new list of the Top 10 second basemen has even more players nearly ready for the big leagues, as well as some familiar names, with Keston Hiura and Luis Urias headlining the five holdovers from last year's list.

Urias, Garrett Hampson and Brandon Lowe all reached the Majors in 2018, and they all seemed poised to make a greater impact in the upcoming season. They also account for half of the six total players on the list who are expected to arrive in the Majors in '19 -- a group that could grow even deeper should a few others surpass projections.

Top 10 Prospects by Position

Additionally, many second basemen who made our Top 10 list in previous years have gone on to have successful careers. Among MLB Pipeline's Top 10 lists for position players dating back to 2011, second basemen have been the third-most valuable group with 308.0 Wins Above Replacement, trailing only outfielders (496.7) and shortstops (569.5).

The Top 10 (ETA)
1. Keston Hiura, Brewers (2019)
2. Luis Urias, Padres (2019)
3. Nick Madrigal, White Sox (2020)
4. Vidal Brujan, Rays (2020)
5. Garrett Hampson, Rockies (2019)
6. Jeter Downs, Dodgers (2021)
7. Brandon Lowe, Rays (2019)
8. Cavan Biggio, Blue Jays (2019)
9. Jahmai Jones, Angels (2020)
10. Isan Diaz, Marlins (2019)
Complete list »

Top tools

Best Hitter: Hiura, Urias (70)
Hiura led NCAA Division I hitters with a .442 average as a UC Irvine junior and was widely considered by scouts as the top pure hitter in the 2017 Draft. After posting a .371 average in his pro debut, Hiura reached Double-A in his first full season, hitting .293 across two levels, and then raked in the Arizona Fall League en route to circuit MVP honors. Urias won the California League batting title (.330) and MVP award as a 19-year-old in 2016 and owns a .306 career average in 467 Minor League games.

Video: Top Prospects: Keston Hiura, 2B, Brewers

Best Power: Hiura (60)
Hiura recorded 52 extra-base hits including 13 home runs in his first full season, and he's poised to tap into even more of his plus raw power as he gains experience and refines his approach. He projects to hit for power to all fields, too, thanks to a preternatural feel for barreling the baseball with a short, impactful right-handed swing that consistently produces loud contact.

Fastest Runner: Brujan (70)
Brujan's 112 runs scored and 55 steals were the first- and second-highest totals in the Minors, respectively, in 2018. That he hits for average, reaches base at a high clip and doesn't strike out much provides Brujan with ample opportunities to wreak havoc on pitchers and defenses with his wheels.

Video: Top Prospects: Vidals Brujan, 2B, Rays

Best Arm: Urias, Brujan, Downs (55)
The keystone doesn't require the type of arm strength needed for the left side of the infield, so it shouldn't be a surprise that no player on this list has a true plus arm. That said, Urias, Brujan and Downs all have seen time at shortstop in their respective careers because they have above-average arms.

Video: Top Prospects: Luis Urias, 2B, Padres

Best Defender: Madrigal, Hampson (60)
Madrigal could be deployed by the White Sox as a shortstop because he has the hands and actions for the position, but his average arm makes him a better long-term fit at second base, where he could be a Gold Glove Award winner. The same goes for the speedy, slick-fielding Hampson, who has seen time at both middle-infield spots.

Video: Top Prospects: Nick Madrigal, 2B, White Sox

Superlatives

Highest Ceiling: Hiura
Hiura's ability to hit for both average and power makes him one of the more exciting offensive prospects in the Minors, and with just one full season under his belt, he's only begun to scratch the surface of his potential. He's a future middle-of-the-lineup run producer and could be the best second baseman in baseball during his prime.

Highest Floor: Madrigal
The White Sox made Madrigal the No. 4 pick in last year's Draft because there's very little doubt that he'll be an everyday player in the Majors. In addition to his aforementioned defense, Madrigal also was one of the better hitters in his class, with an approach and contact skills that will have him hitting atop a lineup for years to come.

Rookie of the Year Candidate: Urias
Urias made his big league debut last August and showed he could do a little bit of everything over parts of 12 games before a hamstring injury prematurely ended his season. Assuming he makes the Opening Day roster, he could have an early advantage in the National League ROY race based on his ability to hit near the top of an order and make everyday contributions on both sides of the ball.

Highest Riser: Downs
Signed by the Reds for $1,822,500 after they selected him with the No. 32 overall pick in the 2017 Draft, Downs posted 13 homers and 37 steals in his first full pro season as a 19-year-old in the Class A Midwest League. That power-speed combo caught the attention of the Dodgers, and they acquired him in December as part of a package for Yasiel Puig, Matt Kemp, Alex Wood and Kyle Farmer.

Humblest Beginning: Urias
Urias was a 16-year-old playing in the Mexican League when the Padres purchased his rights for $100,000 from Mexico City in December 2013. He's quickly proved a bargain for the club, excelling as a younger player at every stop in his career en route to the Major Leagues. He's one of two players on the list who wasn't taken in a Draft.

Most to Prove: Jones
The Angels' second-round pick from 2015 reached Double-A as a 20-year-old last season, but, overall, he hit just .239 across two levels. A shift from the outfield to second base likely played a part in that, and he'll need to make further defensive improvements to remain at the position. Jones does, however, have at least average tools across the board, including plus speed, and he'll carry momentum from a solid Arizona Fall League campaign into 2019.

Keep An Eye On: Kevin Kramer, Pirates
A revamped swing and an emphasis on hitting the ball in the air enabled Kramer to tap into his power last season, as he connected on a career-high 15 home runs and finished second in the Triple-A International League in both average (.311) and doubles (35) before making his big league debut in September.

Video: PIT@CIN: Kramer lines an RBI single into right field

Mike Rosenbaum is a reporter for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter at @GoldenSombrero.

Is signing Machado or Harper the right move?

Scott Merkin answers questions from White Sox fans
MLB.com @scottmerkin

I don't like to see the White Sox willing to commit a large portion of future spending to one position player. Remember that it was great starting pitching that got us the 2005 championship. And while we have several very good prospects in the pipeline, they are not a sure thing. Any huge contract for a position player has to be one that can be traded away later if starting pitching is needed. Do you agree?
-- Kurt, Cedar Rapids, Iowa

I don't agree in this case. You don't add a player such as Manny Machado or Bryce Harper with the thought of trading either. These are players you build winning franchises around. The White Sox targeted this offseason as part of this rebuild and have plenty of payroll flexibility over the next few years. Pitching remains important, but the White Sox are developing young hurlers and will add via free agency if the situation dictates.

I don't like to see the White Sox willing to commit a large portion of future spending to one position player. Remember that it was great starting pitching that got us the 2005 championship. And while we have several very good prospects in the pipeline, they are not a sure thing. Any huge contract for a position player has to be one that can be traded away later if starting pitching is needed. Do you agree?
-- Kurt, Cedar Rapids, Iowa

I don't agree in this case. You don't add a player such as Manny Machado or Bryce Harper with the thought of trading either. These are players you build winning franchises around. The White Sox targeted this offseason as part of this rebuild and have plenty of payroll flexibility over the next few years. Pitching remains important, but the White Sox are developing young hurlers and will add via free agency if the situation dictates.

:: Submit a question to the White Sox Inbox ::

Would signing Harper bring national attention to the White Sox and improve their attendance? Or would Harper's image (face of MLB) be hurt by him signing with the White Sox?
-- John, Chattanooga, Tenn.

Harper is a national brand, even more so than the supremely talented Machado. He would do all you mentioned for the White Sox, not to mention be the face of a new television network. Harper won't hurt his image joining the White Sox with the up-and-coming talent they possess and the exciting brand of baseball they hope is coming to the South Side. Machado could become that same face of the franchise if he signs with the White Sox.

Video: CHC@CWS: Lopez strikes out 8 over 7 strong innings

Am I delusional, or could Reynaldo Lopez contend for the Cy Young if he gets even average run support? He received so little last season. I submit he would have won close to 20 games with a team like the Yankees, Red Sox or Astros.
-- Sol, New York

Wins and losses matter very little in regard to Cy Young Award voting at this point. Take a look at past winners such as Felix Hernandez from 2010 (13-12 record) and Jacob deGrom in the National League last season with a 10-9 record. Lopez certainly has the makeup to be a top-of-the-rotation sort of hurler, as his 1.38 ERA and 48 strikeouts over 45 2/3 innings during his last seven starts of '18 would indicate. I also like Lopez's second gear he switches into in tough situations -- not every pitcher possesses that intangible.

Do you think we can find a bona fide leadoff hitter and No. 1 starter?
-- Bob, LaGrange Park, Ill.

That leadoff spot will be sort of a fluid one during 2019, although I projected Jon Jay there in our recent preseason lineup stories. Nick Madrigal would be a good fit but isn't big league ready at this point. There are a number of No. 1 starter candidates, from Lopez to Carlos Rodon to Michael Kopech to Dylan Cease. But that slot will play out as the rebuild does. A pure ace isn't quite as essential as five quality starters, as the 2005 White Sox could attest.

Video: A.J. Pollock is hitting the free-agent market

Could the White Sox sign Machado, A.J. Pollock and Mike Moustakas and have more impact than signing Harper and Machado?
-- Michael, St. Charles, Ill.

I'm still of the belief no team signs both Harper and Machado. I also believe the White Sox won't execute any more moves near this level to close this offseason past their pursuit of these two. They aren't looking for an incremental bump in 2019. They are looking for players who fit this rebuild now and in the future and certainly are in play for either one of these two, with Machado as the top signing candidate.

What reasonable expectations should Sox fans have of Eloy Jimenez once he comes up?
-- Zack, Schaumburg, Ill.

People should expect Jimenez to be so overwhelmingly good discussions concerning his jersey retirement start almost immediately. I kid. But in all honesty, the White Sox No. 1 prospect looks as if he could be the real fulcrum of this rebuild, so penciling him in as a prime Rookie of the Year candidate in '19 is not far-fetched.

Scott Merkin has covered the White Sox for MLB.com since 2003. Follow him on Twitter @scottmerkin and Facebook and listen to his podcast.

Chicago White Sox

30 best defensive prospects -- 1 for each team

MLB.com

MLB Pipeline recently unveiled its annual All-Defense Team, but there were only so many spots to fill. It made us realize there were so many outstanding defenders across all 30 organizations.

Evaluating defense is still very much subjective, with metrics measuring fielding still imperfect. Still, each system has glovework that stands out more than others, and we considered many to present one best defender from each organization.

MLB Pipeline recently unveiled its annual All-Defense Team, but there were only so many spots to fill. It made us realize there were so many outstanding defenders across all 30 organizations.

Evaluating defense is still very much subjective, with metrics measuring fielding still imperfect. Still, each system has glovework that stands out more than others, and we considered many to present one best defender from each organization.

American League East

Orioles: Cadyn Grenier, SS, No. 9
Grenier's stellar glovework at shortstop was key in helping Oregon State win the 2018 College World Series, and in the process, he established himself as one of the best defensive prospects in the Draft before going to the Orioles as the No. 37 overall pick. With good hands, plus arm strength and plenty of range, Grenier has all the ingredients needed to stick at the position long term.

Red Sox: Bobby Dalbec, 3B, No. 6
Dalbec has always possessed a strong arm and has worked hard to improve his agility and range at third base, with several Red Sox officials rating him as a plus defender and scouts outside the organization grading him more as solid. He also owns prodigious raw power and ranked second in the Minors in extra-base hits (70) and RBIs (109) last year, and fourth in homers (32).

Yankees: Estevan Florial, OF, No. 1 (MLB No. 45)
Florial has some of the best all-around tools in the Minors, with well-above-average raw power, speed and arm strength. He continues to improve as a center fielder, projecting as a plus defender, and has an exceptionally strong arm for the position.

Rays: Lucius Fox, SS, No. 9
While there's no shortage of standout defenders in the highly athletic Rays system, Fox, a top-flight athlete with plus-plus speed, could be the best. He's played shortstop exclusively as a pro and committed 15 errors in 105 games last season while reaching Double-A at age 21. His athleticism makes him an electrifying defender, and he has the requisite physical tools to remain at the position for the long haul.

Video: EAST@WEST: Fox showcases range, slick glove in 3rd

Blue Jays: Kevin Vicuna, SS, unranked
The Blue Jays felt so good about Vicuna's defense in 2017 that they had the then-19-year-old handle shortstop duties for Class A Advanced Dunedin from April 23-June 1, even though Vicuna previously had never played above the Rookie Gulf Coast League. He's an athletic and, at times, flashy defender, with quick, twitchy hands that help him absorb anything hit his way and a quick release that causes his average arm strength to play up across the infield.

AL Central

White Sox: Nick Madrigal, 2B, No. 5 (MLB No. 49)
The White Sox may try Madrigal at shortstop, because he has the hands and actions to thrive there, but his average arm makes him a better fit at second base. With his quickness and instincts, he could be a Gold Glove Award winner at the keystone, and he also rated as the best pure hitter in the 2018 Draft, where he went No. 4 overall.

Video: Top Prospects: Nick Madrigal, 2B, White Sox

Indians: Eric Haase, C, No. 27
Haase reached the Majors for the first time late last season, seven years after the Indians took him in the seventh round of the 2011 Draft. Though he's blossomed on both sides of the ball during the past two seasons, it's been Haase's defensive gains that have helped him climb the Tribe's depth chart. After throwing out 37 percent of attempted basestealers in 2017, Haase improved that mark to nearly 49 percent in '18 (33 of 68).

Tigers: Jake Rogers, C, No. 12
The Tigers got Rogers as part of the Justin Verlander deal, and in Rogers' first full season with the organization, he cemented himself as the game's best defensive catching prospect, earning a spot on MLB Pipeline's All-Defense Team for the second year in a row. He threw out 55.6 percent of potential basestealers in 2018, upping his career rate to 48.5 percent.

Royals: Sebastian Rivero, C, unranked
M.J. Melendez is very athletic for a catcher and has a chance to become a plus defender with an arm to match. Yet South Atlantic League managers rated Rivero, his teammate at Lexington last summer, the low Class A circuit's best defensive backstop in a Baseball America survey last year. The Royals liken Rivero to a young Salvador Perez, and in addition to his physical ability, Rivero also draws raves for his leadership skills, intelligence and work ethic.

Twins: Gilberto Celestino, OF, No. 14
Signed by the Astros for $2.5 million in 2015, Celestino made his United States debut in '17, then got dealt to the Twins in the Ryan Pressly trade last season. He's drawn comparisons to Albert Almora Jr. for his instincts in center, and coaches in Elizabethton feel he's one of the best defenders they've ever seen.

AL West

Astros: Myles Straw, OF, No. 15
Straw has double-plus speed that gives him tremendous range in center field, where his plus arm also stands out at a position not noted for strong throwers. That quickness also plays well on the bases (he topped the Minors with 70 steals in only 79 attempts in 2018) and allows him to beat out hits (he led the Minors with a .358 batting average in '16).

Angels: Jordyn Adams, OF, No. 6
The Angels signed Adams away from playing football and baseball at North Carolina, and he immediately put his tools on display during his pro debut and during instructs. He's still raw, but the Angels feel he has elite range and the highest ceiling as a defender in the organization.

A's: Nick Allen, SS, No. 15
Allen was viewed by many scouts as perhaps the best defensive prospect available in the 2017 Draft, and he's done nothing to diminish that reputation after signing for more than double slot value as the A's third-round pick. There is no doubt among scouts that Allen can stick at shortstop. He's already a plus defender there, with outstanding range that leads to many highlight-reel plays and plus arm strength that allows him to make throws from all over the diamond.

Mariners: Evan White, 1B, No. 5
It's not often a first baseman is mentioned as one of the premier defensive players in the Minors, but that's the reality with White, who recently was named to the All-Defense Team. All signs point to him becoming a Gold Glove Award winner at the position, as he's athletic with outstanding footwork, a strong arm and plus range. His ability to pick throws is elite, and he makes every infielder on his team better as a result.

Video: Top Prospects: Evan White, 1B, Mariners

Rangers: Jose Trevino, C, No. 28
Trevino won Rawlings Minor League Gold Gloves in both 2016 and '17, before surgery on his non-throwing shoulder last July squashed any chances of a three-peat. He's an outstanding receiver and blocker, gets the most out of his strong arm with a quick release and accurate throws and also earns high marks for his ability to run a pitching staff.

National League East

Braves: Cristian Pache, OF, No. 6  (MLB No. 68)
Pache is generally considered to be the best defender in the Minor Leagues, leading our All-Defense Prospect Team. He has the speed and instincts to be a Gold Glove center fielder to go along with a right fielder's arm.

Video: Mayo looks at MLB Pipeline's 2019 All-Defense Team

Marlins: Jose Devers, SS/2B, No. 13
The cousin of Red Sox third basemen Rafael Devers, Jose was acquired by the Marlins last offseason in the blockbuster trade that sent Giancarlo Stanton to the Bronx. While he doesn't have his cousin's offensive profile, Devers is a far superior defender, with the soft hands, slick footwork and strong arm needed to be a big league shortstop. He showcased his defensive prowess last season, committing only seven errors and posting a .971 fielding percentage as an 18-year-old in full-season ball.

Mets: Andres Gimenez, SS, No. 1 (MLB No. 55)
The shortstop on our All-Defense Team, Gimenez reached Double-A in 2018 as a teenager. While he needs to add strength offensively, he has everything he needs to play shortstop defensively in the big leagues. He has plus hands, range and the internal clock to allow him to slow the game down.

Phillies: Luis Garcia, SS, No. 14
Signed for $2.5 million in July 2017, Garcia had a tremendous debut in the Gulf Coast League in '18 on both sides of the ball. He has a strong arm to go along with terrific hands and feet, and speed that gives him excellent range to stay at shortstop long term. He's only going to get better as he matures.

Nationals: Victor Robles, OF, No. 1 (MLB No. 4)
Revered as one of the top defenders in the Minor Leagues and a member of MLB Pipeline's All-Defense Team, Robles has game-changing abilities in center field. His near top-of-the-scale speed gives him range for days in center field, and he's made strides in improving both his reads and routes in the past two years. His plus-plus arm is among the strongest in the Minors, and he totaled 29 outfield assists from 2016-17 before an injury-plagued campaign in '18.

Video: Top Prospects: Victor Robles, OF, Nationals

NL Central

Cubs: Miguel Amaya, C, No. 1 (MLB No. 87)
Amaya's defensive ability and makeup led the Cubs to sign him for $1.25 million out of Panama in 2015, and he continues to impress even though he has been pushed aggressively in the Minors. His aptitude to frame and block pitches is advanced for a teenager, and his arm strength has improved to at least solid and plays up because of his quick transfer and accuracy.

Reds: Mike Siani, OF, No. 9
The Reds' fourth-round pick got first-round money to sign because of his all-around tools. But his defensive skills have long stood out, and he might have been the best defensive outfielder in the 2018 Draft class, with the ability to cover a ton of ground in center and an arm that allowed him to throw low-90s fastballs from the mound in high school.

Brewers: Payton Henry, C, No. 11
A sixth-round pick in 2016 who signed for nearly twice his slot value, Henry threw out nearly 44 percent (46 of 105) of attempted basestealers and had only six passed balls in his first full season. A quick release and a strong, accurate arm help Henry to combat the running game, and evaluators have been impressed with how he's developed a receiving style that utilizes his big, athletic frame. Henry is also praised for his energy and leadership skills.

Pirates: Ke'Bryan Hayes, 3B, No. 2 (MLB No. 48)
Hayes was the third baseman on our All-Defense Team, and for good reason. He entered pro ball as one of the better defenders at the hot corner, but he's gotten even better as he's committed himself to his conditioning, adding to his agility and range to make him the best in the Minors at the position.

Cardinals: Delvin Perez, SS, No. 28
The Cardinals' first-round pick in 2016 has had trouble finding any traction offensively, but there are no concerns about his defensive chops. He gets plus grades on his arm and his overall fielding, thanks to a plus arm when he needs it, above-average hands and plus speed that helps him cover a lot of ground.

NL West

D-backs: Geraldo Perdomo, SS, No. 21
Perdomo's United States debut in 2018 was solid all-around, and he even earned a promotion from the Arizona Rookie League to the Pioneer League in the process. Tall and rangy, the teenager has shown the tools to stay at shortstop long term with outstanding range, actions and hands to go with a strong arm.

Rockies: Yonathan Daza, OF, No. 18
Thanks to his plus speed and fine instincts, Daza covers a lot of ground in center field, and he possesses a plus-plus arm that stands out at his position. He's also a career .310 hitter who won the Class A Advanced California League batting title in 2017 with a .341 mark.

Dodgers: Will Smith, C, No. 5
An outstanding athlete for a catcher, Smith has already shown that he's capable of playing third base and filling in at second. He has very soft hands and impressive agility, making him a fine receiver and framer, and he has a solid arm that plays better than that because of his fast footwork.

Padres: Buddy Reed, OF, No. 13
A member of MLB Pipeline's All-Defense Team, Reed's 70-grade speed and long, gliding strides allow him to cover huge swaths of territory in center field -- and he showcased that with his catch in last year's SiriusXM All-Star Futures Game. Reed also has a strong arm and recorded 12 outfield assists in 2018, surpassing his combined total from his first two seasons.

Video: WLD@USA: Reed wired up, makes great grab at the wall

Giants: Joey Bart, C, No. 1 (MLB No. 23)
The No. 2 overall pick in the 2018 Draft, Bart draws more attention with his bat, but his work behind the plate is impressive as well. He has improved markedly since high school, when scouts wondered if he could stay at catcher, enhancing his agility and receiving and improving the accuracy of his strong arm.

Jim Callis is a reporter for MLB.com. Follow @jimcallisMLB on Twitter. Listen to him on the weekly Pipeline Podcast.

Jonathan Mayo is a reporter for MLB Pipeline. Follow him on Twitter @JonathanMayo and Facebook, and listen to him on the weekly Pipeline Podcast.

Mike Rosenbaum is a reporter for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter at @GoldenSombrero.

Cooper: 'I'm looking for us to get back'

MLB.com @scottmerkin

CHICAGO -- Don Cooper turned 63 on Tuesday, and he approached that birthday with the same high energy and vigor he has shown as the White Sox pitching coach since taking over the position on July 22, 2002.

But Cooper has a little extra fire when talking about his outlook for the 2019 White Sox even before decisions have been reached by premium free agents Manny Machado and/or Bryce Harper, who the club continues to pursue.

CHICAGO -- Don Cooper turned 63 on Tuesday, and he approached that birthday with the same high energy and vigor he has shown as the White Sox pitching coach since taking over the position on July 22, 2002.

But Cooper has a little extra fire when talking about his outlook for the 2019 White Sox even before decisions have been reached by premium free agents Manny Machado and/or Bryce Harper, who the club continues to pursue.

Source: White Sox offer Machado 7-year deal

"Here's what I'm looking for: I'm looking for us to get back," Cooper told MLB.com. "The building is a painful process in many ways, and we all know that last year was the most painful.

"I don't want no more pain. I want to win. I want to win. I want to come to the ballpark and win. It looks like we are getting back; we are in the next stage of the rebuild.

"You know what? [General manager] Rick [Hahn] and [executive vice president] Kenny [Williams] are the architects. We are the construction people. We will carry out the plan when they give us the tools, and the tools have been coming, and hopefully more and more tools head our way."

From a pitching standpoint, Cooper likes the addition of Ivan Nova to the rotation and Kelvin Herrera and Alex Colome to the bullpen. Nova is a solid innings eater behind a healthy Carlos Rodon as well as Reynaldo Lopez and Lucas Giolito, two young hurlers coming off the good and bad of their first full big league seasons.

Video: Herrera discusses signing deal with White Sox, 'pen

If Herrera and Colome pitch with the same consistency as they have in the past, then the White Sox have the ability to greatly shorten a game when factoring in relief returnees such as Nate Jones, Jace Fry and Juan Minaya.

"We are going to come up with challenges for each guy in their journey, in their path," Cooper said. "I'm looking at stuff for all of them.

"How might we improve on what they are doing? It can be numerous different things that I look at, but everyone will have some. If you are not looking to get better, then what are you doing? I'm certainly happy with those acquisitions so far. I'm hoping there's more."

Video: Top Prospects: Dylan Cease, RHP, White Sox

Hahn spoke during a recent conference call on how seemingly every team has a need for more pitching, although he sounded confident with current in-house fifth-starter options like Manny Banuelos, Dylan Covey and Jordan Stephens. Cooper added a few other young arms into that mix, with Dylan Cease (White Sox No. 3 prospect per MLB Pipeline) not appearing far off. He also mentioned Carson Fulmer in that fifth starter's mix.

Cooper's view of the team goes beyond the lens of pitching. He spoke of the plethora of top prospects on their way, ranging from Nick Madrigal to Eloy Jimenez to Cease to Michael Kopech. Cooper is waiting like everyone else to hear the news concerning Machado and Harper, but he already believes that the White Sox are on their way up.

Madrigal set to get back to full baseball mode

"So we have slowly gotten stronger, slowly getting back to where we want to be," Cooper said. "And heck, man, baseball is a funny game. It can take funny bounces. We get a few more people and it could bounce our way this year.

"Last year, we all as coaches came to the ballpark preparing and thinking we were going to win the game and trying like hell, even though obviously we knew we were up against it. That [preparation] is not going to change, but hopefully now [we have] a little more ammunition."

Scott Merkin has covered the White Sox for MLB.com since 2003. Follow him on Twitter @scottmerkin and Facebook and listen to his podcast.

Chicago White Sox

Vizquel moves up to manage Double-A team

Jirschele heads to Winston-Salem as player development staff is named
MLB.com @scottmerkin

CHICAGO -- The 2018 Class A Advanced Winston-Salem roster featured a who's who of top White Sox prospects throughout the course of the season, including right-hander Dylan Cease, outfielder/designated hitter Micker Adolfo, outfielder Blake Rutherford, infielder Nick Madrigal and right-hander Jimmy Lambert to name a few.

With these players moving up through the system toward the Majors following a year of strong development, it made sense to move up Dash manager Omar Vizquel to Double-A Birmingham along with this talented core. Vizquel's change in locale, joined by 2018 Winston-Salem hitting coach Charles Poe, was part of Tuesday's announcement of the '19 player development staff under Chris Getz, who is in his third year as the organization's director.

CHICAGO -- The 2018 Class A Advanced Winston-Salem roster featured a who's who of top White Sox prospects throughout the course of the season, including right-hander Dylan Cease, outfielder/designated hitter Micker Adolfo, outfielder Blake Rutherford, infielder Nick Madrigal and right-hander Jimmy Lambert to name a few.

With these players moving up through the system toward the Majors following a year of strong development, it made sense to move up Dash manager Omar Vizquel to Double-A Birmingham along with this talented core. Vizquel's change in locale, joined by 2018 Winston-Salem hitting coach Charles Poe, was part of Tuesday's announcement of the '19 player development staff under Chris Getz, who is in his third year as the organization's director.

"He created a great culture at Winston-Salem, those guys responded, and we expect something similar to happen in Birmingham at a higher level," Getz said of Vizquel's move to the Barons during a Wednesday conference call. "We felt that those priority players developed well. They took a lot of steps forward.

"I've been around Omar enough, prior to even hiring him; he has such a passion for the game, but he also has a passion for instruction. He's a great communicator. When he walks in the room, he's going to command the room just based on his history. But he's such a genuine person; therefore, he can build relationships very quickly and get buy-in very quickly. It kind of showed last year in the progress that was made with a lot of those players."

Video: Chris Getz discusses the White Sox farm system

Vizquel, 51, managed Winston-Salem to the postseason last year with an 84-54 overall record. Justin Jirschele, the 28-year-old who led Class A Kannapolis to a 74-63 mark and the South Atlantic League playoffs in 2018, moves to Winston-Salem this season in place of Vizquel. Jirschele played for the Dash during parts of the '14 and '15 seasons.

"Numerous players have come up to myself and our staff making it clear they love being around Jirsch because of his communication skills, the humbleness he has," Getz said. "He just relates so well to those guys."

Mark Grudzielanek returns as manager for Triple-A Charlotte, Ryan Newman takes over at Kannapolis and Tim Esmay returns at Advanced Rookie Great Falls. Ever Magallanes will serve as the Arizona Rookie League White Sox manager after overseeing the club's Dominican Academy in 2017-18.

Former Major Leaguers Frank Menechino (hitting coach at Charlotte) and Wes Helms (coach at Birmingham) enter their first season in the White Sox system. Menechino served as the hitting coach for the Marlins from 2014-18 following a seven-year Major League career. He was selected by the White Sox in the 1993 Draft and played from '93-97 in their Minor League system. Helms served as the bench coach for the Lehigh Valley IronPigs in the Philadelphia organization last season. He spent 13 years in the Majors.

Other returning coordinators include Doug Sisson (field), Mike Gellinger (hitting), John Orton (catching) and Aaron Rowand (outfield/baserunning). Rowand played center field for the 2005 World Series champion White Sox, while Gellinger worked with hitting coach Greg Walker as part of that same championship team among their career accomplishments.

Pitching coaches for the 2018 season include returning staffers Steve McCatty (Charlotte), Richard Dotson (Birmingham), Matt Zaleski (Winston-Salem), Jose Bautista (Kannapolis), John Ely (Great Falls) and Felipe Lira (AZL). Everett Teaford and J.R. Perdew will serve as assistant pitching coordinators, while Kirk Champion returns as director of Minor League pitching instruction. Champion begins his 31st season in the White Sox organization.

Matt Lisle represents another new addition to the staff as hitting analytics instructor. The White Sox also have four assistants in player development in Rafael Santana, Tommy Thompson, Rod Larson and Graham Harboe.

Scott Merkin has covered the White Sox for MLB.com since 2003. Follow him on Twitter @scottmerkin and Facebook and listen to his podcast.

Chicago White Sox

First Spring Training workout dates for all clubs

MLB.com @mattkellyMLB

Major League Baseball has revealed the first Spring Training workout dates for pitchers and catchers and those for the full squads for all 30 clubs. MLB also announced game times for all Cactus and Grapefruit League action in February and March.

Major League Baseball has revealed the first Spring Training workout dates for pitchers and catchers and those for the full squads for all 30 clubs. MLB also announced game times for all Cactus and Grapefruit League action in February and March.

:: Spring Training coverage presented by Camping World ::

The A's, fresh off their surprise run to the 2018 American League Wild Card Game, will be the first club to have its pitchers and catchers report. They'll do so on Monday, Feb. 11, followed by the Indians and Mariners on Feb. 12 and the remainder of MLB clubs in the days following. Oakland and Seattle will travel to Tokyo to stage two exhibition games each against Japanese teams on March 17-18, followed by the first two games of the 2019 regular season on March 20-21 at Tokyo Dome.

Complete Spring Training schedule

Oakland and Seattle will hold their first full-squad workouts on Saturday, Feb. 16, in Arizona, with the rest of MLB following suit in the days after. The Braves will be the last club to hold its first full-squad workout, doing so on Thursday, Feb. 21. The A's and Mariners open Cactus League action with a matchup on Feb. 21, and the Rays and Phillies open up Grapefruit League action the following day. The Red Sox and Tigers will play exhibition games against college teams on Feb. 22.

Here are first-workout dates for pitchers and catchers and full squads for each team:

AMERICAN LEAGUE
Angels: Feb. 13/Feb. 18
Astros: Feb. 14/Feb. 18
Athletics: Feb. 11/Feb. 16
Blue Jays: Feb. 14/Feb. 18
Indians: Feb. 12/Feb. 18
Mariners: Feb. 12/Feb. 16
Orioles: Feb. 13/Feb. 18
Rangers: Feb. 13/Feb. 18
Rays: Feb. 13/Feb. 18
Red Sox: Feb. 13/Feb. 18
Royals: Feb. 13/Feb. 18
Tigers: Feb. 13/Feb. 18
Twins: Feb. 14/Feb. 18
White Sox: Feb. 13/Feb. 18
Yankees: Feb. 14/Feb. 19

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Braves: Feb. 16/Feb. 21
Brewers: Feb. 14/Feb. 19
Cardinals: Feb. 13/Feb. 18
Cubs: Feb. 13/Feb. 18
Diamondbacks: Feb. 13/Feb. 18
Dodgers: Feb. 13/Feb. 19
Giants: Feb. 14/Feb. 19
Marlins: Feb. 13/Feb. 18
Mets: Feb. 14/Feb. 18
Nationals: Feb. 14/Feb. 19
Padres: Feb. 13/Feb. 18
Phillies: Feb. 13/Feb. 18
Pirates: Feb. 13/Feb. 18
Reds: Feb. 13/Feb. 18
Rockies: Feb. 13/Feb. 18

Matt Kelly is a reporter for MLB.com based in New York. Follow him on Twitter at @mattkellyMLB.

The MLB.com Hall of Fame ballot results are ...

MLB.com

Six MLB.com writers were among those eligible to cast ballots in the 2019 Hall of Fame vote conducted by the Baseball Writers' Association of America.

• Complete Hall of Fame coverage

Six MLB.com writers were among those eligible to cast ballots in the 2019 Hall of Fame vote conducted by the Baseball Writers' Association of America.

• Complete Hall of Fame coverage

Here's a look at how the six voted, and at the bottom you can see what the totals look like among this group:

T.R. Sullivan
1. Barry Bonds
2. Roger Clemens
3. Roy Halladay
4. Edgar Martinez
5. Fred McGriff
6. Mike Mussina
7. Mariano Rivera
8. Billy Wagner
9. Larry Walker
10. Michael Young

There are many offensive players who could/should be elected based on their career numbers. I strongly believe McGriff is unfairly overlooked because he was one of the last great hitters before the offensive explosion of the late 1990s and early 2000s. Mussina also thrived as a starting pitcher in the American League right in the thick of that era. It should not have taken him this long to be elected. I'm not big on comparables, but Wagner was every bit as good of a reliever as Rivera or Trevor Hoffman.

Video: MLB Tonight on Mike Mussina's Hall of Fame case

Mark Feinsand
1. Barry Bonds
2. Roger Clemens
3. Roy Halladay
4. Edgar Martinez
5. Mike Mussina
6. Manny Ramirez
7. Mariano Rivera
8. Curt Schilling
9. Gary Sheffield
10. Omar Vizquel

Three of the players I voted for a year ago -- Vladimir Guerrero, Chipper Jones and Jim Thome -- were inducted into the Hall, so the holdovers (Bonds, Clemens, Edgar, Mussina, Manny, Schilling and Sheffield) took up the first seven spots on my ballot.

That left me with up to three open spots to fill. Rivera was an obvious choice for one of them in his first time on the ballot, as was Halladay, who, despite a modest win total (203), was one of the most dominant pitchers of his generation. Although I delved into their statistics to confirm what I already knew, these two were no-brainers.

Video: Roy Halladay's case for the Hall of Fame

The final spot was a little more difficult. After a first examination of the 26 players, I narrowed down my choice to Todd Helton, Andruw Jones, Jeff Kent, Fred McGriff, Andy Pettitte, Scott Rolen, Vizquel, Larry Walker and Vernon Wells. (OK, Wells wasn't really on my list, but he was one of my favorite players I ever covered, so I considered using my last spot for him for about 30 seconds.)

Although I probably would have voted for five or six of these players had the ballot been open-ended and without the 10-man limit, my choice ultimately came down to two: Pettitte and Vizquel.

Pettitte is viewed by many as a borderline candidate, a take I can't argue with. While his candidacy might be seen differently by voters, I think he belongs in the conversation. (Based on my voting history, I'm obviously not holding his HGH admission against him.) Having seen similar players such as Jorge Posada, Kenny Lofton and Johan Santana fall off the ballot in their first years, I considered voting for Pettitte in an effort to help him get the requisite 5 percent for him to be on the ballot again next year.

Ultimately, Vizquel's excellence in the field (he took home 11 Gold Gloves and is in the conversation as the best defensive shortstop ever) won out. He might not have been an offensive force, but Vizquel was far from an automatic out, finishing his career with 2,877 hits. Pettitte had a great career and will likely be in the mix for my vote again next year, but my belief that Vizquel should be in the Hall outweighed my hopes of seeing Pettitte remain on the ballot.

Jeffrey Flanagan
1. Barry Bonds
2. Roger Clemens
3. Roy Halladay
4. Andruw Jones
5. Edgar Martinez
6. Mike Mussina
7. Manny Ramirez
8. Mariano Rivera
9. Curt Schilling
10. Larry Walker

It was difficult leaving off McGriff and Rolen, but we only get 10 spots, which is why I've always favored a binary system -- simply yes or no to each candidate. As for the PED issue, my stance hasn't really changed: If what they did (or didn't) do is so egregious, the Hall of Fame should take those players off the ballot. Don't make us be the morality judges.

Video: MLB Network debates Bonds, Clemens' merits for HOF

Richard Justice
1. Barry Bonds
2. Roger Clemens
3. Roy Halladay
4. Edgar Martinez
5. Mike Mussina
6. Mariano Rivera
7. Scott Rolen
8. Curt Schilling
9. Billy Wagner
10. Larry Walker

Easy calls on nine of the 10. All belong in the Hall. As for Wagner, he's one of greatest closers ever, and if they're part of the game (same for DHs), the best of them should be in the Hall. I didn't like leaving off Andruw Jones, Todd Helton, Jeff Kent, Omar Vizquel, Andy Pettitte, Manny Ramirez and Gary Sheffield, who at least deserve to be in the conversation longer.

Jon Paul Morosi
1. Barry Bonds
2. Roger Clemens
3. Roy Halladay
4. Edgar Martinez
5. Fred McGriff
6. Mike Mussina
7. Mariano Rivera
8. Scott Rolen
9. Curt Schilling
10. Larry Walker

I voted for Bonds and Clemens, as I have every year. For now, at least, my policy regarding players tied to PED use remains unchanged: I do not vote for players suspended under MLB's drug policy from 2005 to present, but I support the best all-around players from the complicated era that preceded it.

Rivera is one of the clearest first-ballot Hall of Famers in history, and Halladay's dominant peak (in a hitter-friendly ballpark, against AL East competition) makes him worthy of the Hall. McGriff, overlooked for far too long, hit more home runs -- with a better adjusted OPS -- than first-ballot Hall of Famers Dave Winfield and Carl Yastrzemski; McGriff is eminently qualified for Cooperstown.

My toughest decision came among Rolen, Vizquel and Sheffield for the last of my 10 spots. I opted for Rolen, given the overall quality of his career, at a position underrepresented in the Hall. Rolen is one of only three third basemen in history with at least seven Gold Gloves and seven All-Star appearances. The others are Brooks Robinson and Mike Schmidt.

Video: MLB Network on Edgar Martinez's case for the HOF

Chris Haft
1. Barry Bonds
2. Roger Clemens
3. Roy Halladay
4. Jeff Kent
5. Edgar Martinez
6. Mike Mussina
7. Mariano Rivera
8. Curt Schilling
9. Omar Vizquel
10. Larry Walker

Rivera's career forestalls debate. And if you feel free to vote for closers, you should feel free to vote for other specialists, such as Martinez the designated hitter. I dismounted my moral high horse regarding Bonds and Clemens two or three years ago. I needed some persuasion to vote for Walker; by contrast, I remained stubbornly loyal to Kent. Mussina embodied consistency; Schilling dominated the postseason and Halladay finished 98 games above .500 in just 390 starts. As for Vizquel, I pity those who can't or won't comprehend his excellence.

Vote totals of the 6 MLB.com writers

With 75 percent of the vote needed for entry to the Hall, Bonds, Martinez, Rivera, Mussina, Clemens, Halladay, Schilling and Walker received enough support -- the first six appearing on all six ballots, and the other two appearing on five of six ballots (83 percent) -- from MLB.com writers.

Barry Bonds -- 6 votes
Roger Clemens -- 6
Roy Halladay -- 6
Edgar Martinez -- 6
Mike Mussina -- 6
Mariano Rivera -- 6
Curt Schilling -- 5
Larry Walker -- 5
Fred McGriff -- 2
Manny Ramirez -- 2
Scott Rolen -- 2
Omar Vizquel -- 2
Billy Wagner -- 2
Andruw Jones -- 1
Jeff Kent -- 1
Gary Sheffield -- 1
Michael Young -- 1